(Infographic) How to Dress for a Business Meeting. Yes, Seriously.

(Infographic) How to Dress for a Business Meeting. Yes, Seriously.

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Note to business people everywhere, even you casual Californians: Don’t show up for a business meeting in flip-flops, shorts and a hoodie. Like, ever, man.

Bringing your A-game – and prepping your notes and/or pitch or presentation – are only half of the business meeting readiness equation. The other half is simply looking the part. And this advice couldn’t ring truer than when you meet with a prospective client, connection or employer for the very first time.

Related: Here’s How Clothes Can Make You A More Effective Leader

For men:

Putting your best look forward often comes down a clean, crisp look from head to toe. Svelte suit. Slick tie. Shined shoes. Spruced hair. Channel Don Draper, minus the hangover tang. Remember, we’re talking about looking – not acting – like the dapper Don.

For women:

The same rules apply. An equally unfettered, conservative – basically safe – professional look is often the best choice for meetings, regardless of your gender. If you wear a skirt with your blazer and blouse instead of dress pants, double check that it’s not too short

Finally, before you decide on an outfit for any professional appointment, carefully consider your audience. If you’re meeting someone abroad, research what the locals wear for business tête-à-têtes and dress accordingly. Or, when meeting with a high-level executive, do your best to mirror what he or she will wear, which will likely be a tailored suit.

 

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Business dress code

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

Kim Lachance Shandrow
Kim Lachance Shandrow is a Los Angeles-based tech journalist who specializes in writing about iPhone, BlackBerry, and Android phones, as well as social media marketing, startups, streaming TV, apps and green technology. Her work has appeared on NBC’s The Today Show, MSNBC.com, NBC.com, and in The Los Angeles Times and The International Business Times. She also consults for Ameba, a Canadian multiplatform children’s streaming TV startup.