The 18-Minute Ritual To Boost Your Productivity

The 18-Minute Ritual To Boost Your Productivity

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“With all our technology, it’s never been easier to get distracted,” he says. “In fact, we often welcome distractions because they give us a break from work that takes effort and energy.”

The secret to effectively managing distractions as well as your time is sticking to a ritual, says Bregman: “It needs to be an ongoing process we follow – no matter what – that keeps us focused on our priorities throughout the day.”

1. Plan

5 minutes

Before you begin your day or check your email, sit down with a blank piece of paper and write down tasks that will make the day successful, says Bregman. Then take your calendar and schedule those things into open time slots.

Related: Answer Three-Times More Emails in Half the Time

“There is tremendous power in deciding when you are going to do something,” he says. Place the hardest and most important items at the beginning of the day when distractions are fewer. If your entire list does not fit into your calendar, reprioritise your list.

2. Refocus

1 minute each hour

 

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Set an alarm on your watch, phone, or computer to go off every hour during your workday. When it rings, ask yourself if you spent your last hour productively. This ritual will help catch you when you get off track. How you spend your time can be compared to what you eat at a buffet, Bregman says.

“People often eat poorly at a buffet because what they want to eat in the moment is different from what they wished they’d eaten at the end of the day.”

The same thing can be said for time – what you want to do in the moment is often different from what you wished you had accomplished at the end of the day. Checking in every hour will help keep you on track.

3. Review

5 minutes

At the end of your day, review what worked, where you had the most focus and where you got distracted. “Did you accomplish what you wanted to accomplish?” says Bregman. “If not, what can you do better tomorrow?”

For example, if you got a lot done during the morning but had a hard time concentrating in the afternoon, consider scheduling work that requires focus, such as writing a proposal or designing a marketing campaign, for early in the day. Save less taxing tasks, such as reading email or reviewing website statistics, for the afternoon.

 

Stephanie Vozza
Stephanie Vozza is a freelance writer who has written about business, real estate and lifestyles for more than 20 years. A former small business owner, she recently discovered she's better at writing about them. She lives in the Detroit area with her husband, two sons and their crazy Jack Russell terriers.