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3 Easy Strategies to Nail Your Business Referrals

Nail referrals with these easy strategies.

Harry Welby-Cooke

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Referrals

If you’ve identified referrals as a potential marketing strategy for your business, you need to begin finding specific referral strategies that will work for you and your customers.

Once you decide on these, you need to systemise them so that they become a core part of your business activities, not something you do when you remember, or something you ask your staff to do when they have some free time.

Here are three easy to implement referral strategies you should consider.

1. Stay in touch with your customers

I’d recommend making contact with your customers at least every three months. Astoundingly, most businesses spend five times more money on trying to attract new clients than they do on keeping their existing clients coming back.

Related: The 4 Things Every Customer Wants

Focusing on your existing clients first makes better business sense – after all, they’ve already experienced your product or service (which should be excellent, it goes without saying), so it should be easier and less time-consuming to persuade them to keep doing business with you than to bring in a first time customer.

If you can convert them into raving fans, they are also likely to refer you. Keeping in touch doesn’t have to be expensive or time-consuming either.

It can be as simple as sending out a newsletter once a month, showcasing your special offers available only to newsletter subscribers.

2. Teach customers why it’s good for them to refer you

To encourage your customers to refer you, remember the WIIFM principle (What’s In It For Me).

Customers will want to know what the benefit is to them for referring others to do business with you. You need to explain to customers how referrals will help you, and how you will help them in return for giving referrals.

There are many rewards you can offer for referrals, but what’s important is to explain to customers the mutually beneficial nature. For example, “By referring new clients, you’ll help my business to save on marketing, which allows me to pass on greater savings to customers like you. In return for a successful referral, I will offer you…”

3. Thank every customer

The easiest way to make your customers feel special and ask them to come back and refer friends to you is to thank them. Few businesses do this, which makes it a golden opportunity for your company. A hand-written thank you note goes a long way.

If you have the budget for it, send each customer a small gift with your company logo on it (make sure it’s not corporate junk, but something you would like to receive yourself).

You could send a gift related to the business they’ve done with you. For example, if you’ve sold them a car, send them a car wash voucher (this is also an opportunity to build a partnership with the local car wash to send each other referrals).

Send your thank you a few days after the customer has made the purchase. Although it’s easier for you to give them a thank you when they complete a sale, it doesn’t have the same impact.

Customers are excited to take their purchase home after buying it, but that feeling wears off after a few days. Receiving a thank you from you a week or so after the purchase can reignite that excitement and keep your business top of mind.

Related: How To Make A Personal Connection With Customers 

Harry Welby-Cooke is the Master Licensee for ActionCOACH South Africa. He is also the President of COMENSA (Coaches and Mentors Association of South Africa). ActionCOACH is the world’s largest executive and business coaching company with operations in 39 countries. It is also on the list of the top 100 franchises globally. As a highly successful Business and Executive coach, Harry is a master of teaching business owners how to turn their businesses around and accelerate their growth. Email him at harrywelbycooke@actioncoach.com or call 0861 226 224

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Sales Prospecting

3 Strategies For Closing Sales Without Picking Up The Phone

Cold calls generate follow-up conversations only 10 percent of the time, and lead to in-person meetings less than 2 percent of the time. Use these three strategies to skip the cold calling and get straight to decision-makers today.

Ryan Robinson

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Anyone who’s been on the receiving end of a sales cold call, which is virtually everyone with a phone number, can attest to how annoying these unsolicited sales attempts often are. Even if you stay on the line long enough to hear what the caller is selling, your first question probably isn’t, “Can you please tell me more?”

It’s more like, “How did you get my number?” Or maybe, “Can you please remove me from your calling list?”

Yet cold calling has been a widely used sales tactic for decades, and is often considered a rite of passage for veteran salespeople. But it’s high time for that to change. There are simply more efficient and effective ways to sell products in the digital age.

Time not well spent

Cold calls generate follow-up conversations only 10 percent of the time, according to a Harvard Business Review study. The other 90 percent of the time, they’re most likely alienating potential leads, even the ones who may actually benefit from the product or service being sold.

Related: Have We Lost Our Face-To-Face Sales Ability?

Moreover, not even 2 percent of sales calls lead to an in-person meeting, according to HubSpot research. That means you have to spend a lot of time on the phone before you get the chance to make an in-person pitch.

All of that time spent researching prospects, refining sales scripts and training your sales team to pitch your product on the phone, drives up your cost of customer acquisition immensely. Not surprisingly, HubSpot also reports that cold calls cost roughly 60 percent more per lead than acquisition methods like email marketing and social selling.

Cold calling is an aggressive approach, and today’s consumers don’t want to be pressured into making a purchase, they want to buy into your product and your company on their own terms. The internet has changed how consumers make buying decisions, and buyers now want to be in charge of the purchasing process.

Instead of interrupting customers with annoying sales calls, rely on the following three guidelines to build a better sales strategy:

1Start With Inbound Marketing

The guiding principle behind any successful inbound marketing program is to provide value first and sell second.

If customers understand the value that your company is offering, they’ll be far more likely to do business with you.

HubSpot helped pioneer this approach, and now companies like Sapper Consulting are taking it to the next level where they combine precise targeting and unique, creative email content with the insights — generated by big data to help companies get B2B leads and secure high-quality meetings with decision makers.

A successful inbound marketing campaign is based on a specifically defined audience or a set of customer personas. Companies like HubSpot and Sapper help people target content directly to your personas and establish a voice that resonates with them. According to a study by marketing company Captora, 61 percent of consumers are more likely to make a purchase from companies that use custom content to reach them. Clearly, knowing your audience is key.

Related: Click-2-Call: Securing Sales By Retaining The Customer’s Attention

2Don’t be afraid of public speaking

TED Talks

The popularity of TED Talks and similar forums is evidence of the fact that people want to hear what experts have to say, either in person or over video. But even if you don’t consider yourself an expert yet, public speaking can help you achieve that status.

By speaking at industry-relevant meetings and events, you can start developing brand recognition and a unique perspective on topics related to your business. Plus, you can repurpose speeches as content to use in your future inbound marketing efforts.

A well-delivered speech can be one of the most effective ways to generate sales because you’ll often have prospects in the room when you’re speaking. Grab their attention during your speech, and you’ll likely be handing out business cards afterward.

3Keep an eye on ROI

Content marketing is only effective if you actually use your content. In 2013, SiriusDecisions reported that somewhere between 60 and 70 percent of B2B content goes completely unused. That’s a problem. It shows that many companies are essentially throwing away time and money and calling it content marketing.

Instead of wasting precious resources on your content marketing efforts, clearly define the business objective you hope to achieve with each piece of content you create — beyond page views and click-through rates.

Work to understand the ROI you’re getting out of each piece of content. Quantify your customers’ pain points and create a sales strategy around the solution to those pain points.

Related: 5 Tips To Generate Sales Leads Through Social Media

Thought leadership and content campaigns will also help you engage with consumers and get a better sense of how your content is contributing to sales. Then, repurpose high-performing content and update content that becomes dated to continue attracting new leads.

Likewise, you should keep content that demonstrates your company’s capabilities and other valuable knowledge gated so that you’re not giving away intellectual property — such as industry analysis, buying guides and RFP templates — for free.

Cold calling is a time-honored practice, and it’s likely not going away anytime soon.

But with these tactics, you’ll have much more success acquiring new customers and gain a big advantage over competitors still glued to their phones.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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Sales Prospecting

When Your Market Is Declining Fish Where The Fish Are

Shift your focus from barren and ‘over fished’ markets to customers who are looking for the right solutions.

Ed Hatton

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Just as some anglers forlornly cast their lines into fished-out waters, some companies and sales people continue to focus on markets where nobody is buying any more. Sales and profitability decline and business owners blame downgrades, corruption and labour issues, while their real problem is chasing non-existent sales.

Many sectors in the economy have declined, and suppliers to those sectors will face reduced sales and increased competition. The poultry, steel and mining industries have experienced sharp reductions and face serious challenges. The automotive and manufacturing sectors have experienced reduced volumes, cost cutting and retrenchments. If your primary target market is in any similar sector, and you continue to operate as if nothing has changed, you are taking very high risks.

In some instances, the decline of the target market stems from an event like the horrific massacre at Marikana and the changes that brought to the mining industry. Then you know you need to react, but most change is gradual, and some entrepreneurs may not notice, or shut their eyes to the bad news.

Related: Savvy Sales Skills To Grow Your Franchise Footprint

Others cling to the hope that this decline is temporary, and do nothing. We all love our comfort zones and find many excuses to stay there, and so we sink with the declining market.

Making the right change

Once you have appreciated the problems with your current markets, look for similar markets that are stable or growing. For example, if you sell mining supplies, the construction industry may offer good prospects. Be creative; think how you can use your expertise to supplement declining markets by entering more successful ones.

Focus on high growth business sectors. Perhaps health and fitness, education, green energy or IT services could provide opportunities. Where could you leverage your technology, source of supply and sales processes to enter growing markets?

Look for success stories, there are many, including those profiled in this publication. It is clearly preferable to sell to a company growing rapidly than to one clinging to the edge of the cliff by its fingernails. If you sell business to business, examine the state of your customer’s customer.

If your customer is operating in a declining market, you will follow them downhill unless you take action. Find ways to use your products and services to make them more competitive, to halt their slide and grow at the expense of their competitors.

This is a good time to look deeper into the real needs of your existing customers. While we are selling well, we assume that we are satisfying customer needs appropriately. Are we really doing that? Are there other products or services that would be valuable to our customers? Find out, and then provide solutions.

Get out of your comfort zone

fishi-in-a-basket

It’s easy to say that you should move out of your comfort zone and switch your efforts to more lucrative sectors, but less easy to do. Institutional knowledge, systems, databases, credit records, sales processes and products are all geared to the once-successful industries.

Related: Have We Lost Our Face-To-Face Sales Ability?

Instead of throwing away all of this know-how, it makes sense to adapt the systems and information to new markets in a gradual transition. Start new initiatives by withdrawing resources from the old and using working processes and skills to open new markets.

You are likely to need a core of your operations for your existing markets and customers, but your focus should be on the new initiatives.

Your sales teams may need additional training to work in new areas. They must learn to understand the customers and their needs and adapt to their terminology and business practices.

Continual retention of sales people is a good idea even without change; it is highly desirable if you want to enter new markets successfully. Train all staff who will be a part of that drive, so your whole company becomes capable of delivering great products and even better service to new customers.


Successfully enter new markets

  • Which sectors are similar to yours?
  • How can your current solutions be repackaged for different uses?
  • How can your solutions help customers to be more competitive?

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Sales Prospecting

Attention: The New Consumer Currency

Spendthrift customers are unwilling to part with their attention absent the CX factor.

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customer-service

Spendthrift customers are unwilling to part with their attention absent the CX factor.

In the Customer Experience War, brands need to either minimise customers’ attention spend or make the spend worthwhile, or both. Expectations are high.

Less is more

Customers can get what they want through voice recognition now. Busyness equals status.

Brands need to eliminate the journey between here and there. Think groceries direct to your fridge.

Painful attention suckers must go. Old problem like a laptop ban on flights? Qatar airways will loan you a free laptop during your flight.

Related: Vital Insights You Must Consider To Keep Up With Your Consumers’ Needs

Eliminating certain customer experiences is the way forward for brands. Assure the customer that any negative socio-economic impacts of your product are minimal so they don’t need to do the research.

On the flipside, help customers multitask to maximize their attention spend at one point in time. Audiobooks are winning out on ebooks.

More is more

Customers are seasoned experience collectors. In a social media frenzied macro-culture oversaturated with the flashy, only the most authentic transient tales count.

The masses don’t just want the quick, easy and dead. Detail, delivery, delighting in delicacy is the new deal.

Customers demand the unexpected. Playfulness in an over-adult world is a very real phenomenon. Think rainbow-coloured foods and Mexican tequila rain.

Amidst the hype, people want to feel better about themselves. Purposeful progress on a path toward self-actualisation and a story worth sharing is worth its weight in attention spend. Make it look like an adventure, and your brand is on its way.

Museum workouts and trancing out to Chromatherapy yoga show that you are an edgy go-getter expanding your transcendental horizons. Event spaces more permanent than pop-ups heighten the experiential community. Creative hubs for coworkers fuse funkiness while easing the isolation funk.

Related: 3 Innovative Tactics To Thrive Through The Consumer Evolution

Experiences need to be tailor made to unique specs. Minimalistic approaches can also still grab attention far more powerfully than grandiose firework displays that fizzle out quickly.

Seamless processes, enthralling product

Netflix aims to make watching great content as easy as possible, but wants you to watch the content.

Optimise your CX strategy through a pragmatic approach. At times you will want to spare the customer’s attention spend, and at times you will want to encourage it.

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