Why Quitting The 9-5 Could Be The Best Thing You Ever Do

Why Quitting The 9-5 Could Be The Best Thing You Ever Do

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Many self made entrepreneurs got their start while still working full time in an employee capacity. After spending many long hours working on innovative ideas, personal projects or in conjunction with business owners, these entrepreneurs were finally able to support themselves and quit their regular jobs.

On the way up, there is undoubtedly a lot of fear, anxiety and the ever present unknown element. Just ask Sam Ovens how he gave his boss his letter of resignation to finally pursue his personal dreams. It isn’t easy going in the beginning, and there are a lot of times when it may feel like a mistake. But, if you use the stories of other entrepreneurs to inspire you to quit your 9-5, it really could be the best thing you ever do for your future.

Diving Into Your Business

Contrary to what a lot of people believe, the majority of businesses aren’t started by those who are able to get sizable business loans and put 100% of their efforts into growing their companies. Instead, many businesses are headed by full-time employees, those who wake up early and go to bed extra late because they are determined to get their businesses off of the ground.

Related: 20 Signs That You Should Quit Your Job (Infographic)

These small business owners and entrepreneurs typically invest their own money, and get their friends, and families, and local communities involved in their endeavours until they are able to build up to being widely recognised. Quitting your 9-5 will allow you to invest all of your energy into yourself, and you will no longer feel too distracted or too tired to make progress.

Being More Productive

Even if you have some time set aside before and after work, being productive can be difficult if you know that your efforts are going directly toward yourself instead of an outside entity.

 

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Many people have a mental block that appears when they face themselves, and that includes personal projects and goals. Resigning from your 9-5 job will definitely enable you to be more productive, when it concerns the things that matter most of all.

In reality, working full-time while moonlighting as an entrepreneur or business owner is asking a lot, and bound to lead you to feeling drained of creative juices. When you run full speed ahead without taking time out for yourself, and fill up your calendar so that it is always full, exhaustion always follows.

Fighting Fear of Failure Head-on

Quitting your job so that you can do what you need to do for your business is a frightening prospect. You won’t have the certainty of knowing when and where your next payday is going to come from, and it won’t be as easy for you to land another job in the same field if you have taken substantial time off.

Friends and family aren’t always supportive when budding business owners leave employment behind to pursue their lofty goals, but only because they don’t understand the real source of inspiration.

Tackling the fear that you have of both becoming a success and a failure in business will free you of your subconscious that nags you and makes you feel doubtful of your strengths.

Related: 9 Reasons to Quit Your Job As Soon As You Can

With a traditional 9-5 job comes benefits, stability, prestige and lots of free coffee. The tradeoff is that you won’t be able to call the shots, even when you know that you have the perfect solution in tow.

Regular pay cheques are traded for freedom, which can be entirely depressing for those with an entrepreneurial spirit. Quit your job so that you can see yourself for all that you are worth, accept personal challenges head-on, and give yourself a chance to soar to new and unknown heights.

Luis Aureliano
Luis Aureliano, a business writer and financial analyst. With over 15 years of experience in global finance and an MBA in economics and management, Luis’s areas of expertise include business, marketing, communications, personal finance, macro economics, stocks and emerging markets.