How do I best present an offer of employment?

How do I best present an offer of employment?


Many business owners think that presenting an offer of employment is quite a simple, cut and dried task. You present the offer and the candidate can “take it or leave it!”. Until you actually really want that exceptional talent in your business and they’ve declined your offer for something as simple as; not enough leave days or a proposed start date that they may not be able to adhere to.

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These are all minor problems that if given the opportunity to be voiced could be ironed out quite easily without either party feeling like they’ve sold their soul. Unfortunately however in many instances this opportunity is not given and businesses end up losing talent to their competitors. So how do you best present a letter of offer?

1. Know the persons expectations before presenting

It cannot be stressed enough how important it is that both parties know expectations and priorities.

  • What is more attractive to the candidate?
  • Is it a higher salary or more days leave?
  • Is it a company car or rather flexible working hours?

In an interview situation a candidate may not be too forthcoming with information on what salary they are looking for as they may feel intimidated or embarrassed.

In this case it’s a good idea to find out this information from their recruitment agent or ask them to email you after the interview with a range of salaries they would be happy to move for. You can then assess how this would fit into your budget.

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2. Present the offer letter in person

Says Lisa Knowles; Head of Global Recruitment at Recruitgroup: “If you are using the services of a recruitment agent they will do this for you, they have built that relationship and trust with the candidate and will be able to offer an objective opinion. If not however it is best to meet in person and iron out any questions they or you may have.”

3. Implement an expiry date

A deadline of about 24 hours to a maximum of 2 days should be in writing on the letter of offer.

If the person is serious about the role they will not need more than this to think about and discuss their decision with their significant other.

Of course this is within reason and if longer is needed with justifiable cause then this can be negotiated.

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4. Be flexible

Before presenting a letter of offer decide on how much room you have to manoeuvre. Presenting an offer is much like doing a dance, in the beginning you’re not quite sure of your partner’s style, you try to work together moving a few steps forward and a few steps backwards and standing on toes every now and then.

Eventually though you find out what works for both of you and you fall into step. If you need to change certain points of the offer then do so if you feel the candidate is worth it.

Communication and flexibility are key. Your business needs to move forward with top talent that are engaged, focused and happy. This can only be achieved they feel valued and satisfied right from the start. An offer letter is by no means purely about salary.

There are so many other factors that come into consideration when candidates choose to accept or decline an offer. It’s whether you’re willing to find out and listen to these that will help you either snap up or lose top talent.

Juliette Attwell
Juliette Attwell is Head of Marketing and Operations at Recruitgroup Recruitgroup, a leading recruitment agency that has won Recruiter of the Year in SA for 4 years running. Having grown and developed the Recruitgroup brand over the last 7 years, Juliette is passionate about career engagement and development as well as writing, communication and PR. Juliette was a finalist in the Top Young Executive of the Year- National Business Awards 2014 and holds a Bcom Industrial Psychology with Honours in Marketing. Contact

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