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Change Management

Successful Business – A Question of Relationships

Ensure that you establish internal relationships that are conducive to the development of a healthy, vibrant business.

Harry Welby-Cooke

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Many business people have the misguided perception that just because what goes on inside their business isn’t visible to the public and therefore has no impact or relevance on its customers or clients.  This is where many business owners go wrong.  The way you get along with your staff is vitally important to the well-being of your business.  It’s just like the importance of having a healthy heart.  Just because it’s inside you and can’t be seen doesn’t mean it can be ignored.

Let’s look now at some of the important things you need to consider to ensure that you establish internal relationships that are conducive to the development of a healthy, vibrant business.

Culture

To begin with, one of the most important strategic moves you can make when buying or establishing a new business is to think about the culture you’d like your business to adopt.  Ask all your team members to contribute as this allows them to buy in and identify with the business on a day-to-day basis.  They need to feel comfortable working there and they need to be happy with their working environment.

Once you have reached a consensus on this, write it down and display it prominently at key locations in your workplace.

Every business will have a culture.  It’s just that some cultures develop all on their own because nobody takes charge and directs the way it comes about.  And chances are, these haphazard cultures don’t do anything positive for a business.  They usually just evolve as time goes by incorporating many counter-productive elements like the propensity for gossip, for office politics or for bully to rule the roost. The scary thing about company culture is that once established, it’s extremely difficult to change.  Usually the only way to effect a change is by getting rid of your team or most of them and starting again.  This is a very expensive option.

Stakeholders

Your internal stakeholders are people or organizations that have a direct interest in your business.  They are “insiders” by virtue of their relationship with you.  They are not clients or customers.

So who then can you classify as internal stakeholders? They include:

  • Staff members
  • Shareholders
  • Directors
  • Contractors and sub contractors
  • Suppliers
  • Your franchisor and franchisees
  • Affiliates

There could be more depending on your situation.  Make a note of those who apply to your business by putting names next to the categories.  Then jot down next to each the weighting you’d give as an internal stakeholder.  Some, like team members and franchisees, will rate 100 percent.  Contractors too may also rate 100 percent.  Others may only be rated at 10 or 20 percent.

Going through this exercise will reveal an interesting relationship graph that you can use to tailor your communication effort.  It will also help you to ensure that you aren’t leaving anyone out of the communication loop.

Internal Communication

Communication is the lifeblood of any company.  And just as healthy blood needs to flow through clear open veins, so to must a company have a policy of open communication channels for healthy communication to exist.

Furthermore, in order to facilitate effective communications, a good, trusting, and non-threatening relationship must exist between all parties.

Internal communication occurs within a system, whereas external communication occurs between external systems.  Internal communication also exists on various levels, the interpersonal level, the intra-group level and the intra-organizational level.

What is the purpose of internal communications?  Why is it so important?  Why can’t we just communicate as and when we need to? Internal communication basically has four main functions which are:

  • To manage information
  • To manage the identification of problems and solutions
  • To manage conflict
  • To manage and regulate behaviour

It covers a wide range of important areas.  Get your internal communication wrong and you can expect problems on a wide front.  Get it right and you’ll join an exclusive group of companies that enjoys fantastic working relationships with all their stakeholders. Internal harmony leads to greatly increased productivity and efficiency, which in turn will manifest itself on your bottom line.

www.actioncoachsa.co.za

Harry Welby-Cooke is the Master Licensee for ActionCOACH South Africa. He is also the President of COMENSA (Coaches and Mentors Association of South Africa). ActionCOACH is the world’s largest executive and business coaching company with operations in 39 countries. It is also on the list of the top 100 franchises globally. As a highly successful Business and Executive coach, Harry is a master of teaching business owners how to turn their businesses around and accelerate their growth. Email him at harrywelbycooke@actioncoach.com or call 0861 226 224

Change Management

6 Timeless Strategies That Drive Successful Entrepreneurship

Adhere to these key principles to build a high-growth company amid changing circumstances.

Timothy Sykes

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In today’s ever changing business climate, an entrepreneur can easily become overwhelmed. It’s vital, though, to stay focused on your goals for the company.

Even with a firm strategy in place, every entrepreneur should do these six things to clear a path to success:

1Study the competition

As an entrepreneur, you need to know who your competitors are. You also should understand the rival product or service that is being offering.

This knowledge will help you better market your product or service to stand out, perhaps even using your competition’s weaknesses to your advantage.

2Conserve cash no matter how good business is

Frankly put, live as cheaply as possible.

Entrepreneurs should be as conservative with their money as possible to be able to deal with any rough patch that arises. Conserving several months’ worth of operating expenses in the bank will help you survive most unforeseen circumstances.

3Research new products and services

Understand emerging products or services on the horizon that could improve your company’s operations.

Do your homework.

  • Are you taking advantage of all technology has to offer?
  • Is there an app that could help you manage your time more efficiently or a service that lets you delegate ordinary tasks to free up more time for priority projects?

4Don’t tackle huge markets at first

huge markets

Avoid expanding into large markets in the initial stages. Thinking “if we can capture just 1 percent of China” could turn into a mistake. Niche marketing can be extremely cost effective if you keep three things in mind: Meet the market’s unique needs by offering something new and compelling. Speak the market’s language and understand its hot buttons.

Your language should be in synch with that niche even for the minor aspects of a marketing campaign like the company’s slogan.

5Listen to customer feedback and adapt

Salespeople know the adage “always be closing,” referred to by the acronym ABC. Entrepreneurs have an acronym, too: Always be adapting, or ABA.

But entrepreneurs can evolve their business only when they’re listening to customer feedback. It may not mean much if one customer doesn’t like your product but if this is true for many of them and they’re requesting another feature, listen and be ready to adapt.

Whether you’re adapting your marketing plan, simplifying a product or responding to new trends, pay attention to customer feedback. Be all ears.

6Respond to change

In business change is inevitable and those capable of responding are flexible and versatile.

An entrepreneur must be prepared to accept change and adapt business operations accordingly. Be flexible. If a shift in your product or service is warranted, don’t be left behind. Realize from the start that where you are is likely not to be where you’ll end up. A lack of adaptability can result in loss in customers, profits and even business failure.

As an entrepreneur, understand that the world is evolving rapidly. Even a company founded a year ago could change the world today.

Yes, the world customarily commends big players like Bill Gates and Oprah Winfrey. Yet there’s room for everyone in the game. Entrepreneurship in emerging markets could very well be a major factor in the return of a hearty global economy. Why couldn’t you be a part of that change?

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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Change Management

Yellowwood Future Architects Are Helping Their Clients Understand The New Future

The world is changing. And young, digitally-savvy consumers are becoming an increasingly large and powerful segment. So how should your business adapt to the changing face of the consumer landscape?

GG van Rooyen

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Vital Stats

  • Player: David Blyth
  • Position: CEO
  • Company: Yellowwood Future Architects
  • Established: 1997
  • What they do: Yellowwood is a South African marketing strategy consultancy. It helps clients find top line growth for their businesses by offering strategic focus and insight into customers.
  • Visit: www.ywood.co.za

Yellowwood Future Architects specialises in helping its clients understand their customers. It is a crucial task, since no organisation can survive long-term if if doesn’t have a deep understanding of the people who buy its products and services.

But even companies that pay great attention to their customers can find themselves struggling to understand the mindset of the modern consumer. Why is that? Well, the consumer landscape is changing drastically, especially in Africa.

“Globally, the youth market is the largest the world has ever seen, and Africa has the majority of these young people. According to the latest census figures, South Africa’s 15 to 34-year-olds total in the region of 19,5 million, or 37,6% of the total population of 51,7 million. By comparison, South Africa’s Generation Xers (the 37 to 56-year-olds) number under 12 million. With direct youth spend in South Africa sitting at a hefty R130 billion per annum, marketers need to sit up and take notice of the youth market. “They are not just ‘the future’ as we are often told — they are ’the now’,” says Yellowwood CEO David Blyth.

This means that no company can afford to ignore the youth market. As Blyth says, they are having a profound effect on the economy already, and this influence will only grow as they age.

Related: Turnover Doubling Every 10 Months – Honeybee Has Set Its Sights To Scale Speedily

So what does this new generation look like? What are their wants and needs? And what do they expect of the brands and companies they interact with?

They want relevant marketing

The days when consumers could be seen as passive receivers of marketing materials are over. Young consumers expect the right information at the right time. They don’t want to be spammed with information that’s not relevant to them, but they do want information to be instantly available when necessary.

They have a lot of disposable income

Young consumers have a surprising amount of disposable income. How so? They live with their parents longer than previous generations did, and they often rent instead of buy.

“We are seeing a shift in how young people spend their money. Many of them aren’t paying a bond or monthly car instalments, which gives them more disposable income,” says Blyth. “Depending on your industry, this can have a profound effect on your business.”

They demand authenticity

“Don’t try to be cool,” says Blyth. “Young consumers want brands to be real — they don’t want to be fed an inauthentic marketing line.” According to Blyth, they want to be approached on equal terms.

They want value

“Brands are important,” says Blyth. “But we are also seeing that young consumers want value. Brand alone isn’t enough. There is simply too much choice out there these days. Combine this with an uncertain economy, and a unique value offering becomes critical.”

Related: How Flick Visual Foundry Found High Rewards By Taking A Narrow View

They want dialogue

As mentioned earlier, young consumers aren’t willing to be the passive recipients of marketing material. These days, engagement is key.

“Thanks to platforms like Twitter and Instagram, consumers have a loud voice,” says Blyth. “And they aren’t afraid to use it. They will let you know if they’re unhappy, and they will expect you to respond. They want two-way conversation.”

They are socially conscious

“Young consumers are very socially conscious. They care about social issues and the environment. So it goes without saying that they expect companies and brands to care about these things as well,” says Blyth.
They are complicated

Perhaps the defining characteristic of the youth market is its inability (and unwillingness) to be pigeonholed and broadly defined. Young consumers are incredibly complex in their wants, needs and demands.

They can appear self-centred and very focused on instant gratification, but research has also shown that they are incredibly concerned about the future, and very conscious of social and environmental issues.

What this means is that the days of approaching marketing in a linear way are over. The world is becoming more complex, consumers are becoming more demanding, and companies have no choice but to keep up.

Related: Business Partners Limited Explain What It Takes To Have The X (Fundable) Factor

Take Note

Never assume that you know your customer. Customer research should be an ongoing activity. The world is changing quickly, and companies need to keep up. They need to evolve at the same speed as their consumers.

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Change Management

Developing Your Business’s Ethics Policy

It’s not enough to have a vision statement and values; you have to integrate them into your company’s culture.

Entrepreneur

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Definition: Business ethics is the study of proper business policies and practices regarding potentially controversial issues, such as corporate governance, insider trading, bribery, discrimination, corporate social responsibility and fiduciary responsibilities. Investopedia

In training values and ethics, many “what if” scenarios should be developed so that employees can learn to react to possibilities.

Once you have defined what’s acceptable and what is not, plan how the organisation will respond to employees who do the right thing. For example, if someone makes a business decision that is consistent with organisational ethics, but causes the company to lose business, show that person as a positive example.

Related: The Ethics Coach on How to Maintain the Integrity of Your Brand

Next, examine negative situations. Most lying in organisations isn’t for personal gain but to avoid embarrassing consequences.

If you frequently take success for granted and consistently punish failure, you can count on people changing the numbers to look better than they should, blaming others for their mistakes or hiding errors.

In summary, you should:

  1. Specifically define values and ethics as they relate to suppliers, customers and employees.
  2. Train employees using realistic examples relating to your own business.
  3. Examine how you respond to success and failure. within your organisation.
  4. Reinforce all who make an improvement, not just a select few.

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