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Kingsley Heath’s Simple Recipe For Success

Kingsley Heath is an African-inspired high-end brand that emulates the luxury lodge experience. Its expansion plans include in-store profit partners. Do you have what they’re looking for?

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Kingsley Heath’s recipe for success is simple: Excellent product; good location with access to the right target market; and a store manager who can create the right combination of a winning customer experience and detailed back-end support.

When Bruce Joubert took over the helm of the high-end retail clothing and footwear brand in 2012, he recognised the value of the product and how it was presented.

“At the time there was one niche store in De Waterkant, a trendy retail part of Cape Town’s foeshore area. We quickly worked out that the success of the brand is in its exceptional product, store locations and people.” Joubert has ambitious expansion plans, and he’s actively looking for individuals who will play a critical role in that growth.

“We’ve grown to seven stores nationally and five stores in the UAE, but this is just the beginning.” Our goal is to have 300 stores globally in the next five years.”

Related: How To Design Your Retail Space For Maximum Reward

A winning model

“We don’t want to franchise the concept, but we do want to incentivise entrepreneurially-minded individuals to join the business on a profit share basis.

“The right business partner is essential to the overall success of a store. We’ve got a unique range of clothing, footwear and accessories. The Kingsley Heath brand is synonymous with African lifestyle, quality and luxury, and our customer experience permeates the store, emulating African 5-star lodges. But this will only take us so far. People are the differentiating factor between successful and exceptionally successful, and that’s what we’re aiming for.”

Focused on growth

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Joubert is specific about what he’s looking for: Ambitious individuals between the ages of 20 and 30 who want to take control of their earning potential, but don’t have the start-up capital to purchase a franchise.

“We are an established brand, so this is a great way to earn upwards of R60 000 a month, learn management and business skills from a successful operating team but also use your own initiative to drive sales,” he says.

Joubert’s team is highly ambitious, and they’re looking for like-minded individuals who want to grow with them. These international expansion plans include South African business partners. “This is an African brand, and we want to maintain our unique touch,” says Joubert.

“As we expand we will be offering first options to our local business partners who have proven themselves. The success of our growth plans will be influenced by the people in the business.”

Related: Improve Management Of Retail Returns For A Better Customer Experience

 

Do you have what it takes?

  • Are you a motivated self-starter eager to learn the ins and outs of retail, business, customer service and business management?
  • Do you have the commitment necessary to work the long hours that retail demands?
  • Are you willing to rely on your abilities to generate income through a profit share model?
  • Are you driven to succeed within an established brand?

Email: BusinessPartners@kingsleyheath.co.za to request an application form.

Partnering with Kingsley Heath

kingsley-heath-perfume

William Klokie joined Kingsley Heath when he was 24 years old. For the past two years he has run the Gateway store in Durban, and has experienced enormous business and personal growth .

“It’s difficult to launch your own business in your early 20s,” says Klokie. “You don’t have the cash flow or the track record to secure a bank loan. Joining Kingsley Heath has been a tremendous opportunity.

“If you’re willing to work hard you have a very high earning potential, but more than that, you’re running a business within a business. The mentorship, coaching and support we receive is invaluable. I’m building an amazing skill set and CV for the future — with a track record that I can easily demonstrate.”

For Klokie, it’s been an empowering experience. Expectation is high, and he’s had to deliver, resulting in a personal growth journey that has leapfrogged
his career.

Kingsley Heath is a modern day clothing & footwear supply store that captures the spirit of adventure and the luxury of growing up in Africa.

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Executive Education Geared For Industry 4.0

The Johannesburg Business School (JBS) was established in 2017 as part of the College of Business and Economics at the University of Johannesburg.

University of Johannesburg

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JBS offers a range of innovative executive programmes, expertly designed to develop effective, ethical and enterprising African leaders. With an emphasis on contextual intelligence, leaders are equipped to successfully navigate and overcome the complexities of today’s world, while advancing the evolution of the business environment for the benefit of their organisations and society.

All programmes designed and delivered by the JBS are grounded in the African context, with a strong global connection, for disruptors, entrepreneurs and managers alike. Business with purpose and an impact on the community, increasingly part of day-to-day business in Africa, underpins what JBS represents and does.

JBS is built around three pillars:

  1. Delivering world-class business education with a focus on the African context.
  2. Designing programmes geared for Industry 4.0 and the future world of work.
  3. Providing a platform to stimulate and inform purpose-driven business practices towards a collective impact across the continent.

We are authentically African with disruption and innovation at heart

At JBS we believe higher education is vital to the Fourth Industrial Revolution and ensuring that Africa becomes ‘future fit’. As such, the JBS partners with entities outside of the conventional business education space, with the idea to innovate and reinvent leadership development and education in an ever-changing business environment.

Our Executive Education portfolio provides managers and leaders with offerings that are relevant to the complex and disruptive nature of work, arming them with the skills to successfully navigate the rapidly changing business environment.

Our programmes are delivered with best in class faculty who encourage critical analysis and thinking, while emphasising contextual intelligence and conscious learning. The aim of our offerings is to advance the evolution of the business environment for the benefit of organisations and society at large.

JBS offers bespoke training programmes aligned to organisational strategic imperatives and people development frameworks. Our short courses are designed to equip entrepreneurs and leaders with functional excellence across the practice of management.

The JBS Masterclass offerings is growing in popularity and is available in cross-disciplinary fields, like Strategy, Marketing, Human Resources, Innovation, Coaching and Mentoring, to name a few. These 3-hour interactive sessions provide delegates with the latest insights and a practical view of shifting trends and their impact on business.

Visit www.jbs.ac.za for more information on upcoming programmes

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Changing The Shape Of What’s Possible

Here’s how TomTom Telematics is changing the present (and the future), and the lessons in innovation that you can learn from a game-changer.

TomTom Telematics

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To be a successful company in today’s fast-paced and ever-changing market, you need three key ingredients: Access to markets (which starts with products that clients need), short-term agility and long-term goals.

Consider the epic success of Apple. Steve Jobs was hungry and fast — he drove his teams to achieve more in less time. But he also had a long-term vision that directed the business’s trajectory. True innovation is the result of looking five to ten years into the future, and laying the groundwork now for where the company needs to be then.

TomTom started out in 1991 as a software provider for Palm Pilots, long before the Internet was a thing, or GPS had been opened for civil usage. Today, the listed company’s latest acquisition is Autonomous, a business that focuses on navigation systems for driverless cars. Over the course of almost three decades, TomTom has consistently focused on what comes next: What do consumer and business clients need, where will technology take us, and what will be possible in the near future, enabling greater efficiencies?

Thomas Schmidt, MD of TomTom Telematics, unpacks the five lessons TomTom has learnt while developing world-class solutions for the consumer and B2B markets worldwide.

1. Focus on the problem you’re solving, not on the product you produce

Companies that are too fixated on what they do, instead of where technology and markets are heading, will often find themselves left behind. The most common example is Kodak, who refused to see the dangers digital photography posed. Instead of seeing themselves as a company that helped people capture moments, they saw themselves as manufacturers of films and cameras. The rest of course, is history.

Related: How TomTom Telematics Is Blurring The Lines Between Your Fleet And The Office

Robust businesses reinvent themselves, adjusting solutions to fit the market and making use of technological breakthroughs. “In 1991, the founders of TomTom launched a company called Palmtop,” says Thomas.

“They designed and created the software for digital organisers. In principle, it was like a smartphone with no connectivity, and included a digital bible, a digital cookbook, a personal organiser, a calendar and a whole host of other features. By the late 90s it even included a digital map, which they had licensed through Tele Atlas, a Belgian company that developed very basic digital maps.”

Here’s how it worked: You bought a PalmPilot, purchased the map software, uploaded it to your device, and then purchased the cables and mountings that you’d need to instal the whole system in your car. It was complicated and something that only techies were really trying out, but it triggered something in the TomTom (at that stage Palmtop) team, who recognised that if they could remove the tech hurdles to get there, they’d democratise navigation.

The company had been a forerunner in the personal organiser software business. Based on where they believed the market was heading however, they began to shift their focus to hardware, and began manufacturing personal navigation devices (PNDs), complete with digital maps licensed through Tele Atlas.

By 2003 the business had been rebranded to TomTom and their first device, the TomTom Go, was launched. From there the business consistently grew 400% year-on-year, and an IPO was concluded in May 2005.

In hindsight, the shift looks simple, but in reality, it’s never easy to reinvent yourself as a business, unless you’re agile, adaptable, and willing to focus on the best solution, rather than what your current product stack looks like.

2. Always look ahead

foresight

Great visions always precede technological solutions. If they didn’t, nothing would ever progress or change. The companies capable of those visions become the trailblazers and game-changers that shape industries, solve problems and drive greater efficiencies.

The evolution of TomTom’s dynamic map data is a perfect example of this mindset in action, because the team kept asking what would make their product more useful to consumers. They had the device, and a digital map. What they didn’t have was mobile data.

Instead, Tele Atlas had vans driving around, capturing everything. It was time consuming, expensive, and meant maps were always out of date. They also weren’t dynamic.

“When you consider the fact that 15% of a map’s data changes yearly, we knew there was so much more we could do with this product if we just had the right tools, and developed appropriate solutions,” explains Thomas.

TomTom’s team started by looking to the future: What did they want this product to look like? The answer was simple: They wanted a navigation system that was dynamic and up-to-date. If anything happened, a user would know within minutes. This would include traffic, accidents, traffic lights that weren’t working, delays — anything and everything that would add value to a motorist or business with vehicles on the road. Today, this includes data drawn from how a vehicle is operating and how the driver is performing, right through to its location with regard to a dynamic map, and the capability to send companies and clients up-to-date information.

The technology that has made all this possible came after the idea of what the team wanted to achieve. With the right starting point, they were able to develop solutions that were possible. “We had millions of units on the road. We created a functionality that allowed users to update information on the map when they plugged it into their computers to update the software.”

Related: Why Your Fleet Management Plays a Pivotal Role In Your Business

The problem was that it was a slow process. By the time TomTom gathered the data, sent it to Tele Atlas, and the changes were implemented and released in an update, months had passed. Consumers lost interest because it took so long to see a change.

So, the team went back to the problem to engineer a different solution. “We went back to the data we were collecting, and started comparing that data with the map. What were speed averages on different roads? Based on this, we could predict times of the day when you could expect traffic congestion and delays. We also paid attention to roads on the map that no one used, or areas with no roads that nevertheless had traffic. These were flagged as out-dated areas on the map, and we could send vans to check those areas only. It was all based on historical data, but we were adding more information to the map on a continuous basis.”

The next component to be added to the mix was telematics. Thomas’ company, Data Factory, was purchased by TomTom in 2005. “Telematics brought more data early on to TomTom. This was real-time data that could be deployed elsewhere. In the early days we were using trunket radios to capture data, but it was all fed into the system. An average car spends less than an hour on the road each day. Compare this to six hours for a business car, and up to 12 hours for a truck, and you’ll get a view of how much data we were actually collecting. The trick was to continuously ask how we could use the data, and what we could do with it. It was not yet a dynamic system, but we were constantly moving forward and improving. We kept asking, ‘If we had this, what could we do with it?’”

TomTom also made another decision, and offered to purchase Tele Atlas in 2008. “We recognised that the future was fresh, up-to-date data. If we owned the maps, we can streamline the process. Two different companies, even working in partnership, create a lot of delays.

“Increasing efficiencies wherever you can is in our DNA. That’s what we do for customers. And it’s why we’ve been able to offer our customers up-to-date dynamic maps that are data-rich and create a seamless customer experience.”

3. Adapt to the future

This takes the ideal of looking ahead a step further. On the one hand, looking ahead is focused on the lane you’re currently in, and envisioning how you can change customer lives. But it’s also about paying attention to how the world is changing, and what the future will bring.

TomTom is currently a software and hardware developer. The business has four divisions: TomTom Consumer, TomTom Automotive, TomTom Licensing and TomTom Telematics. In each case, hardware and software solutions are deployed to drive efficiencies and cost savings, from consumers with a TomTom device in their vehicles, cars with onboard systems designed by TomTom, telematics systems that track a business’s entire transport and logistics solution, to the map data as one of the sources for Apple’s map solution.

But TomTom is looking much further than the solutions it currently offers. “TomTom democratised navigation, and today it’s available in multiple different ways; your phone, a device, your car. We understand this and move with the times. We expect technology disruption to go on and things to change even faster in the future. Today we manufacture devices. We don’t believe we will still be doing this in the long-term future. How our solutions will be accessed will change. We are also now investing heavily in the navigation systems and maps autonomous cars will use. This isn’t a big revenue stream for us now, but it will be incredibly important in the future, and we will have solutions ready.

“To stay alive, you need to be smarter, faster and the master in your specific area of competence. At our core we bring customers, data and development together. It’s always about the best experience and solutions.”

Related: Fleet Tools Will Help You Get More Done In Less Time

4. Be fast, agile and adaptable

Even though TomTom is a listed company, its controlling shareholding rests in the hands of four people — all of whom are entrepreneurs. “TomTom’s original founders still head up the business and drive its vision, and the four different business units are run by MDs who are entrepreneurial as well,” explains Thomas, who is one of those MDs, and who by his own admission could never be a standard employee.

“Data Factory was the third business I built, and I sold it to TomTom in 2005 because I knew this was the best way to achieve international growth. 12 years later I’m still here as MD of the Telematics business because our CEO and founder, Harold Goddijn, convinced me to stay and grow the exciting business unit. The fact that we’re given so much autonomy to grow each business unit as a company makes us fast, agile and adaptable. It’s the essence of this business. We all have a fiduciary duty to our shareholders, but we also have long-term visions that allow us to be trailblazers in our industry.

“We’re not executives who begin to implement projects and then leave. We’re focused on long-term, industry changing visions that will change the way our customers operate and do business. That’s what gets me up in the morning and keeps me constantly engaged and excited.”

The business is also run on a system of flat hierarchies, which Thomas believes is a key ingredient to TomTom’s success. “No single giant can know or understand everything. To remain relevant, businesses need fresh ideas, and these come from open and collaborative teams. As the leader, you don’t need to come up with all of the ideas — but you do need to be open to fresh thinking, even from your juniors. Have an open door policy, and listen to ideas when they are shared with you. That’s how you push the envelope.”

5. Give customers what they need, not what they want

customer-service

Listening to customers is important, but you also need to look beyond their current needs if you’re going to be a game- changer — both in your own industry, and in terms of what you can do for your customers.

“Take note of your customers’ pain points and deliver solutions that create value, but you can’t innovate if you only listen to what your customers want. You need to be delivering to their needs, otherwise you’re just an executor and not an innovator.

“It’s up to you to jump to the next step that they can’t see yet, and often don’t even realise is possible. Customers are focused on the now — we need to be looking five years ahead.”

How do you stay ahead of the curve though? Thomas believes it’s all about asking the right questions.

“Consider the question, ‘What if we had unlimited energy for free in the world?’ So many people stop there and don’t ask further, because it’s seen as an impossibility. And that’s what kills innovation. If you remove that obstacle, and instead look at what this would mean for the world, you can start shaping a different future.

Related: Time Is Money And It’s Time You Saved Both When Running Your Fleet

“So, what would it mean? It would mean an unlimited water supply, because we could easily make drinking water from salt water, at little to no cost. What does unlimited drinking water mean? An unlimited food supply, because water is the biggest restrictor. Once you start asking the right questions, you reach a future that you want to be a part of and make happen — and that’s when you start finding solutions.

“Solar is already doing this, at 50% of the cost of other alternatives. The latest technology delivers at 50% of the price, and it was developed because the right questions are being asked.

“This is how we operate. We are always dreaming about what we could do. This allows us to create solutions. They don’t always work, but we’re hungry, and when we fail we fail fast, learn the lessons we need and push on. We’re always heading in the right direction, and changing the shape of what’s possible.”

Visit telematics.tomtom.com/tellmemore and follow us on Twitter @TomTomWEBFLEET 

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Set Up Your SME For Success With Fibre

Boost your business potential when you plug into fibre. It offers unprecedented benefits, taking your business to the next level of connectivity.

Ignite

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More South Africans are turning to fibre for fast Internet access. We’re witnessing a boom in fibre expansion and as a result, it’s becoming a more affordable option for SMEs. Once businesses connect to fibre, they can access a reliable, ultra high-speed connection that unlocks the full advantage of cloud-based processing.

Cater to usage demands

A slow Internet connection can derail your business. It’s imperative for business owners to prepare their networks to handle additional usage requirements. Failing to do this might lead to interruptions, slowdowns and a potential impact on your bottom line. An Internet connection should be a tool that supports innovation and uninterrupted productivity.

Shift to the cloud

More businesses are accessing cloud-hosted information via Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) tools and other platforms. In 2018, nine out of 10 companies in South Africa said they had increased spending on cloud computing, according to a report by World Wide Worx and F5 Networks. Running your day-to-day business on the cloud requires you to have a more powerful Internet connection.

Support video and VoIP

Some businesses make use of video capabilities for training and meetings, and VoIP for sales and marketing. On a fibre line, businesses can ensure they meet these demands without putting a strain on the network. With fibre, business owners can run voice and Internet data on the same line but may look at installing a second data connection for redundancy.

Get what you pay for

There’s no denying it, fibre provides exceptional speeds and offers a brilliant price-to-performance ratio. You won’t receive the same contention ratio as other connection mediums – you will get what you pay for. Bandwidth caps are less of an issue with fibre because there’s a choice of affordable uncapped deals on offer.

Make the right choice

  • Before you decide on your fibre deal, ask the right questions, understand exactly what you’re paying for and match your business requirements with the right amount of bandwidth.
  • Choose a provider that allows you to manage growth for the long term – one that allows you to choose your deal, scale when necessary and not throttle your fibre line.
  • You’ll also want an ISP to have your back further down the line. Insist on obtaining a comprehensive list of services along with the monthly fee. Ensure you are provided with a full service including all necessary support and equipment to deliver optimal fibre performance.

Ignite’s drive and purpose is to be the spark that inspires SMEs, which is why the Ignite Fibre service is structured to put you in control. Ignite offers you tailored packages that take into account your daily Internet and business startup needs.

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