Connect with us

Business Landscape

Africa Open for Business – a View from Davos

With Africa being proclaimed as the future for business investment, the 42nd World Economic Forum (WEF) held in Davos in January presented a great opportunity for me to verify this view.

Allon Raiz



Blue Globe

There were any number of issues clamouring for attention at Davos this year – the Arab Spring, the Eurozone crisis, burgeoning youth unemployment, the shifting of power from West to East, to name but a few. Nevertheless, the clarion call from Africa was quite distinct: “Africa is Rising”; this was the message from the African heads of state who attended the Forum.

They put on a great show. The stigma of Africa as the “hopeless continent,” as it was labelled by the Economist in 2000, must be removed they said. There is new hope, democracy is growing, dictatorship is dying out, pragmatic leadership is on the increase, political instability is on the decline. The tables are turning; Angola is funding Portugal and the genocide in Rwanda happened 18 years ago – it is over and Rwanda is making great strides in opening its economy to investment and new enterprise.

Indeed, the African delegation effectively countered India’s case, presented at Davos a year ago, as an alternative to investment in Africa. India argued that it is English speaking, it is a democracy, people are literate, it has mineral resources and it is an attractive alternative for foreign direct investment. Africa’s rebuttal this year was just as strong.

Growing at a rapid rate

The delegation presented a compelling scenario of a continent that is experiencing the highest rate of urbanisation in the history of mankind, that is the second fastest growing region in the world after Asia, that experienced the least volatility during the financial crisis and where the average economic growth for 2011 was 6%, with 45 out of 46 countries growing their GDP last year. In the West the general perception is that Africa is a continent of poverty but, in truth, 34% of households are middle-income. The size of the untapped market is formidable – Nigeria alone will have a population of 390 million people by 2050, making it the 5th most populous country in the world.

A notable presentation came from President Alpha Condé of Guinea Conakry who reported on his country’s drive for transparent governance within in government. For instance, Guinea’s mining tenders are now placed online and the winning bids are also published online in the interests of transparency and reducing fraud and corruption. President Condé also spoke, to great acclaim, of the need for Africans to develop self-respect by setting higher standards of professionalism for themselves, including moving away from the ubiquitous ‘Africa time’. “I see our country as a sleeping beauty that needs to wake up soon,” he said.

At the same time there was a pragmatic consensus that Africa still has many obstacles to overcome, foremost amongst these being infrastructure, education, transparency and governance, trade barriers and access to energy and technology. Investment is seen as the necessary catalyst for change, bringing new capacity and empowerment to the continent and, in turn, producing economic dividends for all. In this context, the Governor of the Bank of Botswana, Linah Mohohlo, called for a sovereign credit rating for Africa, as a route to providing clarity and confidence to the investor market and increasing investment into Africa.

Infrastructure investment

There is, as we know, huge scope for infrastructure investment. Africa needs roads, pipelines, intra-country airline services, power generation, supply chain capacity and connectivity (digital connectivity in particular). With infrastructure investment coming into the country, industry and manufacturing opportunities would be there for the taking – at present, only 1% of the world’s manufactured products come out of Africa.

Governments are welcoming private-public partnership initiatives that involve capacity building and skills transfer to local communities. Indeed, the most successful investment projects are those that are delivering holistic solutions, with companies in diverse sectors collaborating with each other and with in-country and regional stakeholders, to supply infrastructure, logistics, services, connectivity, training, routes to market and so on.

The potential for agricultural development in Africa is very encouraging. At present, only a small percentage of arable land on the continent is used for cultivation; yet there is huge opportunity for food security. China is already buying up large tracks of arable land for growing its own food. But investment in logistics infrastructure is critically needed, so that local producers can reach wider markets. Without this kind of investment, farmers will remain trapped in subsistence agriculture and we will continue to see famine-stricken areas dependent on food flown in by donor agencies, rather than receiving supplies from their neighbouring countries.

Kenya reported on its forward thinking strategy to supply cheaper bandwidth. The Kenyan government took the decision to slash the cost of bandwidth to promote the uptake of internet connectivity and drive business growth. The result is that Kenya has leapfrogged South Africa as the country with the highest internet penetration in Africa (South Africa has dropped to fourth place) and is making rapid progress in building an IT culture and economy.

Going wireless

The quality of life of even the poorest and the most marginalised is affected by wireless connectivity – look at the impact of M-PESA, the mobile phone payment service for the unbanked.  And we are only now starting to appreciate the impact that digital connectivity has on intellectual capital and to see how we can harness collective intellectual power to develop solutions. The opportunities in a wired Africa are breathtaking.

The message from Davos is that it is time for a new story about Africa – this will, in fact, be the theme of the Africa WEF meeting in Addis Abbaba in May this year. Although impediments remain, African leaders are showing greater unity on strategy. The world economy is a complex system in which all the pieces of the puzzle are shifting and one of the new favourites is Africa. For South Africa the opportunities are very exciting. We have the access, so we need to wake up and seize the day.

Allon Raiz is the CEO of Raizcorp, the only privately-owned small business ‘prosperator’ in Allon Raiz is the CEO of Raizcorp. In 2008, Raiz was selected as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum, and in 2011 he was appointed for the first time as a member of the Global Agenda Council on Fostering Entrepreneurship. Following a series of entrepreneurship master classes delivered at Oxford University in April 2014, Raiz has been recognised as the Entrepreneur-in-Residence at the University of Oxford’s Saïd Business School. Follow Allon on Twitter.


Business Landscape

How Economic Crime Is Impacting Business In South Africa

77% of SA organisations have experienced economic crime and CEO’s and boards are increasingly being held accountable for economic crime.






South African organisations continue to report the highest instances of economic crime in the world with economic crime reaching its highest level over the past decade, according to PwC’s biennial Global Economic Crime Survey.

South African organisations that have experienced economic crime is now at a staggering 77%, followed in second place by Kenya (75%), and thirdly France (71%). With half of the top ten countries who reported economic crime coming from Africa, the situation at home is more than dire.

The Global Economic Crime and Fraud Survey examines over 7200 respondents from 123 countries, of which 282 were from South Africa.

The rise of economic crime

Trevor White PwC Partner, Forensic Services and South Africa Survey Leader, says: “ Economic crime continues to disrupt business, with this year’s results showing a steep incline in reported instances of economic crime. At 77% South Africa’s rate of reported economic crime remains significantly higher than the global average rate of 49%. However, this year saw an unprecedented growth in the global trend, with a 36% period-on-period increase since 2016.”

Related: PwC Focus On Sugar Tax

Economic crime in South Africa is now at the highest level over the past decade. It is also alarming to note that 6% of executives in South Africa (Africa 5% and Global 7%) simply did not know whether their respective organisations were being affected by economic crime or not.

While the overall rate of economic crime reported was indeed the highest for South Africa, the period-on-period rate of increase for South Africa and Africa as a whole was below that of our American, Asian and European counterparts.

Global indicators of a rise in economic crime

From a regional perspective, the biggest increase in experiences of economic crime occurred in Latin America, where there was a 25% increase since 2016 to 53% in respondents who indicated they had experienced economic crime. The US was a close second with a 17% increase over 2016 to 54% of respondents, while Asia Pacific and Eastern Europe experienced increases of 16% and 14%, respectively.

Asset misappropriation continues to remain the most prevalent form of economic crime reported by 45% of respondents globally and 49% of South African respondents. While the instances of reported cybercrime showed a small decrease in the South African context (29% in 2018 versus 32% in 2016), it retained its second place in the global rankings (31%) albeit at a lower rate of occurrence than 2016.

One of the new categories of economic crimes was that of “fraud committed by the consumer”.

It is the second most reported crime in South Africa at 42% and takes third place globally at 29%. This was followed closely by procurement fraud (39% in South Africa versus 22% globally). This indicates that the entire supply chain in SouthAfrica is fraught with criminality.

Related: PwC: Pria Chetty

When combined with the high instances of bribery and corruption reported (affecting more than a third of organisations at 34%), the resultant erosion in value from the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) is startling. Accounting fraud, which is usually perpetrated by senior management and results in the largest losses, increased from 20% to 22%.

Accountability of the board

Accountability for fraud and economic crime has moved into the executive suite, with the C-Suite increasingly taking responsibility, and the fall, when economic crime and fraud occur.”

The survey shows that almost every serious incident of fraud has been brought to the attention of senior management (95%).

85% of South African respondents indicated their organization had a formal business ethics and compliance programme in place.

In addition, 20% of local respondents indicated that the CEO (who is part of the first line of defence) has primary responsibility for the organisation’s ethics and compliance programmes, and is therefore more instrumental to the detection of fraud and the response to it.

Continue Reading

Business Landscape

PwC Focus On Sugar Tax

The proposed sugar levy is unlikely to make sizeable dent in fiscal deficit, but the Sugar Beverage Industry is offering a helping hand to reduce obesity.






In 2016, the National Treasury announced a Sugar Beverage Levy (SBL) on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) scheduled to take effect April 2018. The aim of the levy was to prevent and control obesity in South Africa, but key industry players also viewed it as a potentially significant new source of revenue that could help plug the growing fiscal deficit.

The fiscal deficit has been widening as National Treasury faces slow economic growth and a shrinking tax base. Initially estimated at 3.1% of GDP, fiscal deficit projections increased to 4.3% of GDP in October last year.[i]

However, official data suggests the deficit already reached R195 billion in the first 8 months of the 2018/19 fiscal year, so it could amount to approximately R250 billion, thereby exceeding Finance Minister Gigaba’s October projections by 25%.

The levy has undergone various changes since it was first announced.

When the levy takes effect in April this year, it will amount to 2.1 cents per gram of sugar per 100ml, above 4 grams per 100ml.

This is down from an initial 2.29 cents per gram of sugar with no exempted amount.[ii]

Related: Silver Linings For Smaller Businesses In Budget 2018

Our estimations suggest the tax burden is approximately 10% given current levels of sugar content, down from approximately 20% previously. In addition, industry has recently reacted to the news of the SBL, reducing the sugar content of popular beverages by including non-nutritive sweeteners.

In addition to efforts to reformulate, the industry introduced smaller bottle sizes to curb excessive sugar consumption and limit the excise tax burden.

SBL excise revenue estimations

We estimated that in a scenario in which the beverages industry makes no change to the sugar content of SSBs, the levy would result in an estimated R1.5 billion loss in sales revenue and a R 1.4 billion excise revenue gain for government.

However, a reformulation by industry would result in a lower loss in sales revenues of only R1.07bn and lower than expected excise revenue gain for government of R990mn.

Given the estimated fiscal budget deficit of up to R250bn, additional revenues of between R990mn and R1.4bn are unlikely to make a significant dent in plugging the deficit and could support the assertion that the levy will focus on curbing sugar consumption rather than providing significant additional revenue inflows.

In our quantitative analysis of the proposed tax on SSBs, we use the PwC Economic Impact Assessment Model to derive the potential impacts, based on a 10% sales reduction calculation due to potential excise driven price changes.

Although excise revenues are expected to increase, other tax revenue streams are likely to experience a decline. Not considering excise impacts, the prospective tax revenue loss stemming from reduced sales revenues and showing in lower VAT, corporate income tax (CIT) and personal income tax (PIT) could range between R363 million and R518 million in the reformulation and non-reformulation scenarios, respectively.

Related: 4 Budget Speech 2018 Outcomes To Know For Your Business

Therefore, the net impact on estimated tax revenue combining the implications for excise tax, VAT, CIT and PIT revenue would only range between R631 million and R856 million, subject to which scenario is implemented.

It is unclear whether the SBL levy will assist in reducing consumers’ sugar consumption. However, industry facilitates lower sugar consumption by reducing bottle sizes and through reformulation.

Smaller sizes nudge consumers to lower sugar consumption

In addition to reformulating popular SSBs, the beverages industry has altered the size of the 500ml buddy bottle to 440ml, potentially nudging consumers to reducing their sugar consumption.

The move to the 440ml bottle represents a 12%[iii] reduction in size and means that sugar content fell from 53 grams in the 500ml bottle to 46.6 grams in the 440ml bottle.

The implementation of the new levy could still result in an approximately 61 cent increase in the price of the 440ml bottle.

It remains to be seen how South Africans will react to the current and impending price change of SSBs and if the SBL can indeed assist in reducing obesity. It is clear that monitoring and evaluation are key tools to help government and industry understand the effectiveness of this initiative to prevent and control obesity in South Africa.

Continue Reading

Business Landscape

What It Will Really Take For South Africa’s Businesses To Scale And Create Jobs

It is the “low-hanging fruit” of scaling up South Africa’s established SME businesses that we believe is at the core of how we can grow this economy further.

Graham Mitchell




Much has been said about the potential of SMEs to drive job creation and economic growth for South Africa. Our unemployment rate is at 26.7% – an astonishing figure that speaks volumes about the dire need for job creation. On the back of this, we are seeing increasing amounts of money being channeled into incubators and the funding of startup companies.

Although important, the starting of new businesses, unless they are completely innovative, well-timed and highly scalable, will not provide us with much-needed quick wins on our path to job creation and economic growth. It is the “low-hanging fruit” of scaling up South Africa’s established SME businesses that we believe is at the core of how we can grow this economy further.

The state of established businesses in South Africa

Established businesses that already employ 10-20 people have a working product, willing buyers and a proven business model and with some modifications, increased guidance and adequate management, they have the potential to increase their number of employees significantly as they scale up. However, a 2016/2017 report by the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) in partnership with the University of Cape Town found that the rate of established businesses in South Africa has declined by an incredible 26% since 2015.

Related: How South Africa’s Small Businesses Plan To Invest Their Money In 2018

In fact, South Africa had one of the lowest established business rates of all the economies that participated in the GEM 2016 study (ranked 61st out of 65 economies). This, the report says, “paints a bleak picture of the SMME sector’s potential to contribute meaningfully to job creation, economic growth and more equal income distribution.” While we should not neglect the starting of new businesses, scaling up established businesses will provide young people with much needed experience to ensure that when they eventually start their own businesses, they may have greater chances of success.

How to increase the proportion of established businesses that scale up    

Have a clear vision for your business

When we as business coaches work with established businesses that are scaling up, we make sure to start with the founder as their attitudes and desires determine how far the business will go. Scaling up an established business begins with a clear vision. Often, we find that the businesses owners don’t have a clear vision of where they want to take their business, and without a vision, it’s very difficult to scale.

Determine why your business exists

Linked to a clear vision, business owners need to have a strong purpose that answers the question of why they want to scale. Some business owners often see their business as a vehicle that provides them with an income, rather than the business serving a bigger purpose to impact an industry or the broader society. As a result, they often stop short of developing the full potential of their businesses.

Be willing to learn and seek help where needed

Business owners also need to have a willingness to learn. Being entrepreneurs, they often have a definitive view of the world and how it should work, which drives them to create something that they believe needs to exist (a new business venture). A risk to these strongly held views and high levels of confidence is that entrepreneurs potentially won’t open themselves up to new ideas, or to being challenged that some of their beliefs and views may, in fact, be holding their businesses back.

Business owners need to realise that they may not have all the skills to scale their business. I’ve found that entrepreneurs tend to be strong in customer service, innovation and sales, and are often weaker in people management and attention to detail – skills that become a lot more critical at the point of scaling the business.

Related: Levergy Founders Tell You How To Scale Quickly – And Intelligently

business-day-tv-sme-summitOther areas of importance in scaling up

There are other critical areas that businesses need to address in scaling up but dealing with the founder is most critical. Strategy is one, cash flow is another, as is the question of hiring/finding and developing key talent. I will be unpacking these and more at the upcoming Business Day TV SME Summit on 8 March; and with increasing efforts by government to address the unemployment crises through platforms like the Jobs Summit announced in the State of the Nation Address, we hope that more conversations are had around harnessing the job creation power of established businesses that manage to scale up quickly and sustainably.

Continue Reading



Recent Posts

Follow Us

We respect your privacy. 
* indicates required.


FREE E-BOOK: How to Build an Entrepreneurial Mindset

Sign up now for Entrepreneur's Daily Newsletters to Download​​