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Welcome to the Nimble Workplace of the Future, One Fostering Constant Change

People hate it. They resist it. They fear it. And yet, change is an inevitable part of life. There’s even a word for the fear of change: metathesiophobia.

Avinoam Nowogrodski

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“The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.” – H.P. Lovecraft

Nowhere is change more prevalent than in the workplace. Businesses are constantly generating, processing, analysing and making decisions based on evolving data. In the almost Darwinian business world, it’s essential to adapt to change – specifically ones that can improve the bottom line.

Related: The Science of Change

If change is a necessary ingredient for success, why do so many in the workplace fear it? Change can be associated with uncertainty, new routines, office politics, loss of control or autonomy. Often, people prefer the ‘devil they know’ to facing the unknown.

Traditionally, change management has been viewed as a one-time (or infrequent) event, governed by a specific set of methods and metrics. It could be related to a new product rollout, for which a company establishes internal management teams, training sessions, fresh corporate documents and flow charts.

Related: Leading Your Team Down the Path of Change in 4 Steps

Introduce transitioning on a rolling basis. But change should be recognised as an ongoing process – a philosophy, not a one-off event. Historically, people have thought about change in the workplace as the transition from one way of working to another. The current (and future) workplace demands accepting change and embracing it. Indeed at any given time, employees in many workplaces are adapting to changes in new technology, projects and leadership.

Change management should not be viewed as a set of processes for moving from Point A to Point B, but instead a workplace philosophy that encompasses real-time collaboration, participation, alignment and awareness.

Related: Are you a Mover or a Head-Shaker?

Recognize the next change leaders: millennials. So, if change is a prerequisite for the modern workplace, who will be leading the charge? Most likely millennials will be leading – or heavily influencing – change in the workplace of the future. Encompassing those born from the early 1980s to the early 2000s, millennials will represent 3 out of every 4 workers globally by 2025.

 Change, it appears, is part of the millennial DNA. These workers thrive on constant engagement, collaboration, social relationships, transparency and social media.

Millennials prefer to work at any time from anywhere, multitasking with ‘real-time’ interaction. They also feel the need to contribute, share and be heard – all characteristic of the democratic workplace.

The democratic workplace celebrates participation, making obsolete traditional hierarchies – bosses in boardrooms and workers in cubes. Companies should articulate a democracy vision or mission statement that not only addresses change and participation but also mistakes. Active employee participation drives company innovation. An integral part of active participation is trial and error.

Understand that making mistakes is part of the process. There’s that saying, ‘If you are not making mistakes, you are not moving fast enough.’ Nowhere is that mantra more relevant than in the modern democratic workplace, where workers should ask for forgiveness, not permission. When people fear making mistakes, they are not participating, since participating includes exploring new product strategies and driving creative business models and the like.

The corporate landscape is littered with companies who resisted change – and paid the price. Consider Polaroid. In the 1960s, the company could have been the Google of its time. Polaroid, however, failed to adapt to video and digital cameras and declared bankruptcy in 2001.

Blockbuster has a similar story. While the video rental chain made the transition from offering VHS tapes to DVDs, it has not adapted to the next big change: video-on-demand. Blockbuster’s retail stores are closing by the hundreds.

Adaptation is integral to corporate success. Think of it as ‘survival of the business fittest.’ Before planning major initiatives like a new enterprise-resource-planning system rollout and plotting the number of transitions that must occur, outline a company culture that embraces constant change.

A democratic-focused company mission statement is the first step in managing ongoing change within an organization. Democracy and a ‘move fast, break things’ approach are necessary for a company to become agile, highly adaptive and, most important, an innovative leader.

Related: Learn to Adapt In The Face of Adversity

Avinoam Nowogrodski is the founder and CEO of Clarizen. Previously he was a co-founder of SmarTeam Corporation and served as its CEO.

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Business Landscape

The New Rules Of Customer Experience

Intelligent Experience Economy will change the rules of customer experience.

PwC

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Our report identifies five rules organisations can follow to reimagine the customer experience in the ‘Intelligent Experience Economy’. These rules are the action that organisations need to take if they want to be successful in this new era:

1. Make the customer journey your new chain

Most executives understand the importance of CX and have some form of customer strategy to address it. However, the ‘Intelligent Experience Economy’ calls for significant action. Organisations will need to develop an enterprise-wide customer journey. Creating a common language and taxonomy around the customer that is universally adopted will spur CX transformation at scale and embed the customer in the core of the organisational culture.

Related: Why Customers Don’t Respond To Disruption

2. Embed AI in the Customer Experience

Our research confirms that businesses understand the critical and still growing importance of ‘big data’ and analytics. However, having an analytics function. AI will be the dominant capability enabling companies to reimagine the CX in the ‘Intelligent Experience Economy’. Embedding AI in the CX is a great opportunity for organisations. It can enable easier communication with customers, speed up transaction times, personalise customer experiences and significantly reduce customer service costs. Furthermore, organisations that have embedded AI will have unique access to customer data.

3. Connect Customer Experience to real value

Customer metrics are now commonplace in businesses. Although the metric is important, too many businesses see it as the end point instead of the starting point. CCOs assessing their CX transformation efforts must take into account how mature their organisation’s CX measurement maturity is.

For many, CX measurement is still immature – actively listening to customers and collecting feedback, but not taking action with CX initiatives. Organisations should develop real-time customer metrics.

4. Let the COO drive Customer Experience Change

The role of the COO needs to evolve if organisations are to execute on their ambitious goals for their CX visions in the next few years. The role of the COO will need to shift from ‘measuring the CX’ to being directive on the priorities to drive CX change. In order to be more directive, end-to-end capabilities will be needed within the organisations, framed around journey stages.

Related: Why Your Latest Tech Investment Might Not Be Wowing Your Customers

5. Ignite the core

To create real CX transformation – the COO cannot be successful alone. The challenge is about ‘igniting the core’ around CX. To ‘ignite the core’ organisations need to spread the CX vision with all leaders, managers, frontline employees and back office employees alike. Furthermore, organisations will have to establish partnerships across the value chain – including UX/CX experts, data analysis, AI architects, app developers, as well as project delivery partners.

How can organisations execute the customer experience?

In order to be a leading customer experience organisation, companies will need to execute the customer experience at scale across the organisation. Customer strategy execution is transformational in nature and requires new capabilities, new ways of working and an entire organisation to be fully behind the new vision.

 

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Business Landscape

Never Mind The New Dawn – The Sun’s Shining For Brave SA Entrepreneurs

How do you manage risks and where do you find opportunities where the ‘sensible’ money fears to tread?

Marc Wachsberger

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We’re planning to open two new apartment hotels each year, which is a pretty aggressive growth strategy in an environment where land expropriation without compensation is the hot topic of the moment, and investors are looking beyond our borders for growth opportunities.

However, I believe that smart entrepreneurs find opportunity in every financial climate, no matter how dire it may seem on the surface. For example, current investor caution means that those who are willing to take calculated risks face less competition – now and in the long term.

In our sector, international hotel groups are slowing or even halting any investment in improving existing properties or developing new ones. For us, that means our competition is thinning, and that there are more opportunities for us to build on prime sites for which we would have had stiff, if not insurmountable, competition in the past.

Related: 10 SA Entrepreneurs Who Built Their Businesses From Nothing

How do you manage risks and where do you find opportunities where the ‘sensible’ money fears to tread?

  • If an issue seems to be an obstacle, do your research to understand all the implications. In the property business, we’re finding out how to structure our new builds and acquisitions so that they’re unlikely targets for any potential expropriation, including focusing on transformation, job creation, and promoting tourism – all elements of the National Development Plan.
  • Find ways to make your investment opportunities appealing. For example, Section 12J of the Income Tax Act offers scope to create investment options that reduce tax liability and offer alternative sources of return.
  • One of South Africa’s biggest challenges is a shortage of skills. We’re changing that by investing in our people, giving them access to training and career growth opportunities, and teaching them how to be entrepreneurs. We believe that these skills will either help our business grow, or they’ll give the individuals the courage they need to launch their own businesses – yet another great outcome for the country.
  • While South Africa is developed in many ways, it still has many characteristics of an emerging market. This means that there are still many opportunities for brave entrepreneurs here, equipped with the ‘can-do’ attitude for which we are famous, that wouldn’t likely be available in more developed markets.
  • Even though countries like Nigeria and Kenya are gateways to their regions, South Africa remains a gateway to SADEC countries and markets beyond. Adapting your products or services to appeal to those travelling through South Africa is a way of growing your client base too. For example, we have found that our apartment hotels in the Sandton district are particularly popular with visitors from the continent who come to the city to shop – but who don’t like local food. They choose our hotels because they can prepare their own favourites in our apartments’ fully equipped kitchens – clear example of how adapting to meet the needs of a potentially ‘lost’ opportunity can carve a niche for your business.
  • Work harder than your competitors to convince bankers and shareholders that you’ve done everything possible – and then some – to manage risk. If you can tell a compelling story supported by solid facts, investors are likely to make decisions more quickly, giving you the edge over your competitors.

Related: 10 Successful SA Women Entrepreneurs’ Top Advice On Balancing Work And Family

Ours is truly a homegrown business, with long term plans to continue our growth throughout South Africa. Current risks have certainly made us sharpen our proverbial pencils but using these risks to identify opportunities and research them into reality has seen us stand out from our competitors.

Any business that takes the time to interrogate challenges properly will find opportunities where others flee in uninformed fear. Do your homework and you’ll agree with me: South Africa really is one of the best places in the world to build a new business.

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Business Landscape

Saving Time When You Need It Most

With the right tools in place, thanks to TomTom Telematics, the company’s Emergency medical technicians can reach the scene faster — and as a result, they can concentrate on what they do best, saving lives.

TomTom Telematics

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Vital Stats

No two industries are alike. Each sector faces its own unique challenges, and businesses within those sectors have specific KPIs they need to deliver on. For businesses in the emergency medical services sector, time is of the essence. Seconds can mean the difference between life and death.

For a company like Redicure EMS, how quickly an ambulance can reach the scene of a medical emergency is at the very heart of its value proposition.

“Every day we have another chance to save a life,” says Rosert Manamela, an emergency care practitioner at Redicure. “But to do that, we need to be able to get to the scene on time.”

Racing the clock

Redicure has a strict policy that all ambulance drivers stick to the rules of the road at all times. “We have lights and sirens, but we still need to be safe. You can’t assume everyone else sharing the road with you has heard or seen you.”

Related: How TomTom Telematics Can Keep Your Business Moving Forward

The company’s entire fleet utilises TomTom Telematics devices for this reason. “We’re able to receive up-to-date information on traffic within the area as well as alternative routes. When you’re racing against the clock you don’t have time to consider your different options — you need an immediate plan of action that will get you where you need to be.”

Thanks to this platform, which links each vehicle on the road with Redicure’s control centre, the EMS provider’s promise to all of its clients is that an ambulance will be on the scene within 15 minutes. Because vehicles are tracked, the trained emergency care practitioners — who are both monitoring the vehicles and in contact with the client who requires emergency services — can keep everyone informed from the control centre.

Pushing the boundaries of innovation

After two years operating in the medical emergencies sector, and based on their relationship with TomTom Telematics, the team at Redicure began to evaluate what else they could do to support the safety and wellbeing of South Africans facing a medical emergency.

“WEBFLEET is open API, which means it can integrate with any other applications you have,” explains Rosert. “We understood the value TomTom Telematics had brought to our business by enabling us to get to emergencies as quickly as possible, and so we started thinking about what else we could do with this technology.”

The answer was instant access to Redicure in the case of an emergency. “Once you solve the problem of how quickly an ambulance can reach you, the next challenge is how quickly you can get hold of an ambulance. We approached this problem with an understanding that in an emergency people don’t always have all the information they need on hand — who should they call, can they get through, and how quickly can the control centre gather all the information they need to be able to dispatch an ambulance? All of this wastes precious time.”

Related: How TomTom Telematics Is Blurring The Lines Between Your Fleet And The Office

In response to this clear need, Redicure has piloted the Redicure app with Tshwane University of Technology across its six campuses. Each student has been encouraged to download the app. In the case of an emergency, one push of a button immediately sends a signal to Redicure’s control centre, complete with who needs medical assistance, all of their contact details, and most importantly, their location.

Through TomTom Telematics’ WEBFLEET solution, an alert is then sent out from the control room to the closest ambulance in the area, and the client is contacted with up-to-date expected arrival times.

“We’re changing the face of medical emergency response times, thanks to technology that enables us to get to the scene of a medical emergency more quickly and efficiently,” says Rosert.

“We’re also fine-tuning what we do on a daily basis, thanks to the information available through WEBFLEET. With TomTom, we’re not only working with collaborators who understand our business, but support the development and growth of our services and products, allowing us to push the limits of what’s possible in our industry.”

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