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South African Podcasting On The Rise

In South Africa, podcast consumption has grown by 50% in the past 12 months alone, and represents the fastest growing sector of media consumption in South Africa.

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Local and international research reveals that once users switch to podcasts, they tend to stick to the medium for a long period of time, which makes it the ideal platform to build on a narrative, whether you’re a brand wanting to reach larger business audiences or a podcast host who wants to launch their own platform.

When Matt Brown first launched his podcast, The Matt Brown Show, it was to give entrepreneurs and business owners access to in-depth insights from local and international tech and business giants.

His own entrepreneurial experiences revealed the risk and instability associated with start-ups, and he was fascinated with disruptive technologies coming to the fore. If he needed a way to stay on top of things, he knew his fellow entrepreneurs did too, or they would run the risk of becoming irrelevant. The solution? A podcast that interviews tech and business giants, delving into their insights and experiences, and shared with listeners in over 100 countries.

“Through the Matt Brown Show, our goal was to build a channel that helped fellow entrepreneurs access those learnings through a story-telling medium, because let’s face it, we’re hard-wired for stories,” says Brown. “Long-format shows like podcasts are great for storytelling and enable listeners to get a deeper and richer understanding of something that relates to entrepreneurship and the world of business.”

Since its launch in 2016, The Matt Brown Show is consistently in the top 20 podcasts in South Africa, has reached the #1 spot in ‘Management & Marketing’ on 13 separate occasions and is currently ranked in the top 100 shows in the category around the world. It’s a formula that works, but Brown believes his fellow entrepreneurs and brands should be using it to reach their audiences as well.

A growing media platform

“The problem was that as a South African-based podcast host, I only had access to research on my medium that was conducted in the US. As a whole, the stats already confirmed my own experience of podcasting, namely, that podcasts are the single fastest growing medium in the world,” says Brown.

According to The Infinite Dial report, conducted by Edison Research, the 2018 US stats are up from 2017, continuing the growth trend of podcasting. According to the report, 64% of Americans have heard of podcasts (that’s more people than know who the Vice President is), 44% of Americans have listened to a podcast, and one third of Americans between the ages of 25 and 54 listen to podcasts monthly.

Related: Everything You Need To Know About Podcasting But Were Afraid To Ask

“The stat that really struck home with me though was that in 2018, 6 million more Americans listen to podcasts weekly versus 2017, taking the total up to 48 million people. Podcast fans listen to 40% more shows than last year. All the trends point up – particularly for people who have already been converted by the medium,” says Matt.

“But that still didn’t tell us what was happening in the South African landscape. We wanted to understand how South Africans consume podcasts and to do that, we needed to conduct our own research.”

Through the South African Podcast Media Consumption Research Data, Trends & Analysis Report 2018, Matt Brown Media wanted to answer a number of key questions, including:

  • The breadth and depth of podcast media consumption currently taking place in South Africa
  • The true size of the addressable market of podcasts in South Africa
  • The most popular categories and types of podcasts preferred by South Africans
  • Why South African’s are switching from the radio to on-demand podcast consumption
  • The demographic profile of the typical South African podcast listener (income, education, age and employment)

“Our goal was three-fold. First, by gaining a better understanding of our audience and addressable market, we can create content that is relevant and insightful. Second, we want to help brands explore the role of content in their own storytelling, and finally we want to educate listeners on the benefits of podcasts, since this is a medium that anyone can access for free to improve their own knowledge and industry insights.”

The research was conducted through digital and traditional media partners, and validated in the Eastern Cape, South Africa’s poorest region. With 15 682 respondents, the research was balanced to be a representative sample of age, gender, location and ethnicity.

Podcasts bridge demographic divides

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Based on the research, the current addressable market for podcasting in South Africa is approximately 16 million people. “We believe there’s a very specific reason why there’s such a comparatively large addressable market in South Africa, and it comes down to our demographics: With such a rich, diverse culture, consumers are looking for media that speaks directly to them.”

In fact, according to the report, most South Africans don’t listen to podcasts simply because they don’t know how to access them on their phones, which means education is a key factor in growing local audiences.

Google search and social media are the primary sources of information related to podcasts.

Word-of-mouth is also a key channel of influence when it comes to SA podcast listeners finding new shows. This underscores the importance of producing quality content over quantity.

Podcasts are ‘sticky’

The research revealed that 80% of South Africans listen to the majority of a podcast. Once consumers are engaged, there is a stickiness factor to the medium that represents big opportunities for narrative-based, branded content for brands and sponsored content for podcast producers.

Most South African podcast listeners also listen to a podcast within 24 hours of download.

Related: Show Me The Mic, Matt Brown

This indicates that consumers perceive podcasts to be of high-value to them, as they want to consume the content almost immediately. 

The most popular type of podcasts are entertainment-based (at 56%), with ‘real-time information’ orientated podcasts coming in at 47% and learning and information at 40% respectively. “In my own experience, the sweet spot for most podcasts is ‘edutainment’ – entertaining content that also service to increase knowledge and skills,” says Brown. “The top-ranking podcasts in the US support this as well.”

Podcasts reach high LSM listeners

Respondents are split equally over whether they prefer listening to the radio or podcasts. This supports the consumer perception that podcasts are an extension of traditional radio, although podcasts represent new opportunities for narrative-based storytelling. 

Most podcast listeners are employed full-time. This indicates that the profile of the typical South African podcast listener is LSM 7-10.

From an education perspective, podcasts represent a significant opportunity to drive the informal learning agenda across South Africa. 43% of podcast listeners are highly educated, which implies information access is key driver of consumption for this segment.

In South Africa, the primary podcast listener is aged between 35 and 54 (in line with US stats), with the secondary listener aged between 25 and 34. The majority of podcast listeners have a household income of between R100 000 and R1 million.

Entrepreneur Magazine is South Africa's top read business publication with the highest readership per month according to AMPS. The title has won seven major publishing excellence awards since it's launch in 2006. Entrepreneur Magazine is the "how-to" handbook for growing companies. Find us on Google+ here.

Technology

What’s Smart About Cities? Inviting Exponential Possibilities

It is also what produces both their problems and their innovativity that needs to be considered.

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Cities are intense. They are diverse, competitive and malleable – highly responsive to human and non-human action, sometimes in weird and unpredictable ways. Therefore, cities tend to be characterised by an elevated urgency, messiness and even volatility. And this intensity is what attracts many of us to them. It is also what produces both their problems and their innovativity.

What cities are not is a place to park off and wait for anything. These are energetic places where you have to be busy and engaged – light on the feet, fingers to the pulse, living in the dynamic realities and fantasies, and there are always old and new problems with which to contend. And this is exactly why innovation is often acknowledged as a largely urban phenomenon – the consequence of this intensity combined with other conditions, such as the concentration of knowledge organisations and infrastructures in urban centres worldwide.

So, whenever people ask me about smart cities, I have a standard response: “What’s smart to you?” And often what follows is a litany of tech solutions we could be deploying in cities to make them more efficient, more futuristic.

Now, I love tech as much as the next person and I am not ignorant of the exponential growth and fundamental impacts of tech in our times. However, I am also aware of another concurrent reality: that human population, and particularly in the youth category, has also been growing exponentially in Africa. And people (for now) develop tech. So, where do we locate smart or not smart?

Let’s start with some facts that we are all increasingly aware of. Today, over half of the world’s population is under 30, and two billion are classified as youth. In South Africa, already over 20 million people (35% of national population) are between the ages of 15 and 34. According to the United Nations, one out of three young people in the world will be African by 2050.

Related: Watch List: 20 SA Tech Entrepreneurs Making It Big In The Industry

How exciting! Notwithstanding the serious issue of planetary limits, we are looking at billions of young people who are designed to be creative and adaptive in a range of contexts and with the ability to exchange and learn. There are so many possibilities and directions imaginable! Yet when we start talking about how we innovate our way into and through the future, the focus is squarely elsewhere. Suddenly there are very few and very similar voices around the table that focus on the agency of a few and centre tech as the key driver. The agency of billions is occluded and they become the so-called entitled beneficiaries, use cases, and/or the grateful consumers.

Coming back to smart (and my assertion that I am not anti-tech) – why does this matter? Well, it matters because tech is developed and governed by people. People determine the assumptions and rules that we embed into what we encode. We en-culture tech so to speak – contrary to the simplistic claim that tech is objective or neutral.

In my view, it is not likely that technology on its own has the potential to be usefully transformative. Consider, the hyper-connected world that IoT enables or blockchain’s democratisation of not only administration, but also of traditional entrepreneurship and innovation systems. These could be transformative – but not if our processes of technological development and diffusion are the domain of the fortunate few, circumventing – or even subverting – the recognition and involvement of the billions. Barring blind faith in the benevolence of the privileged or in happenstance – the technologies are far more likely to reproduce our current structure and gaps of privilege and exclusion. This is a good example of how not to be smart: following the same old processes with new tools and expecting different results. And then not recognising it as such.

We need to get smarter. We need to activate the over 50% unemployed youth in South Africa as well as the billion who are living in slums all around the world. We need to cease thinking of inclusion only as an outcome, and instead tap into the dynamism of place and the spirit of youth to engage, play, imagine, try to mix. We need to open up to an abundance of visceral ideas and queer possibilities which speak to a multiverse of unique contexts, circumstances and considerations; which are witty, novel and generative.

This, in my view, is the essence of what we should refer to as “smart”. With this openness, there is the possibility of pursuing the idea that everything from the strategic to the operational processes and assumptions of technological change can be more relevant and transformative as processes of current inclusiveness than as solutions for a magical future destination called inclusion.

Imagine a situation where everyone was acknowledged as having ideas which any of them could pursue on the ideas’ merit and relevance, and with concomitant recognition, rather than advancement relying on arbitrarily (or even unfairly) assigned access and privilege and power? Imagine that…

“Smart” for South Africa – and for African cities – has got to be about enabling the millions and billions of youth to do what they could do best: energise and inspire. And while we may have been focusing on millennials’ poor education or non-sensibilities as the excuses for their perpetual exclusion, it is evident that even these assumptions need to be subjected to interrogation and innovation. The smart process has to be open to finding new ways of being and doing, and figure out how to make them work. The technologies will follow function, rather than vice versa.

The recently launched African Leadership Institute report An Abundance of Young African Leaders but no Seat at the Table (2018), bears a title that tells it all. According to this report, 700 000 young Africans have been exposed to some form of leadership initiative in recent years. Yet they get little opportunity to gain the experience of providing leadership and are, the report says, largely invisible.

Cities and emerging technologies are not abstract trends around us. Nor are they autonomous solutions for the future of humanity or so-called smartness. They are part of an ecosystem of which we are part, and in which we should probably be looking to enact different processes of engagement, given our challenges and desire to be smarter. We could start by inviting the transformative potential of our massive numbers of youth, drawing them out of invisibility. If we don’t recognise our real abundance – the abundance of youthful potential and possibility – then perhaps we are just waiting for a few people somewhere with their gadgets to come colonise our future with their version of what is considered to be smart, and then to specify our role in it. And that is really not very smart.

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How Lexus Is Emphasising Quality And Taking Craftsmanship To New Heights

The seventh generation Lexus ES is crafted to the last millimetre and is the essence of comfort​.

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The seventh generation Lexus ES ushers in an era of performance, mirrored by design that stirs the soul. The exceptional body rigidity allows for incredible design freedom, resulting in design that has the confidence to stand out. The brave new design that is lower, wider and sleeker, giving this sedan a coupé-like silhouette.

The 2018 Lexus ES range has no space for mediocrity – every vehicle excels and provokes. The petrol ES 250 EX and hybrid ES 300H SE set a standard of excellence with unparalleled levels of sophistication, elegance and performance. The Lexus ES range places all available performance in the driver’s hands for an intimate experience. It is performance that can be heard and felt.

The new Lexus ES has a profile that is impossible to ignore. The striking signature spindle grille is a significant feature, a sculpted form that speaks of inherited architecture and meticulous craftsmanship. It is the embodiment of provocative elegance, of finesse and sophistication.

Every curve builds from the grille. Athletic headlights flow from the spindle grille, emphasising the sleek lines of the three-dimensional front-end while tracing the outline of the lowered roofline.

The Lexus Takumi craftsmen embody the quest for perfection by carefully refining design elements. Boldness is balanced with elegance, and innovative design characteristics are made possible by the new chassis platform that allows the New Generation ES to be longer, wider and more spacious than ever before, but with a sleeker and lower silhouette. The fastback roofline captures the glamour of a coupé and emphasises the low stance, while the interior roominess is all premium sedan.

Related: 10 SA Entrepreneurs Who Built Their Businesses From Nothing

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The meticulous attention to detail of the Lexus Takumi craftsmen is evident in every inch of the Lexus ES interior. In a physical manifestation of Omotenashi, the Japanese philosophy of warm hospitality where your every need is anticipated and catered for, the Lexus ES offers a personal comfort zone, an escape from the ordinary.

The ES seduces you with details such as embossed stitching on semi-aniline leather-trimmed* seating and real wood trim*. The door panels flow into the instrument console, creating a sense of spaciousness, and at the same time placing all controls of the navigation*, Multi-information and entertainment systems within your grasp, while all driving related functions, as well as those for communication, are controlled from the leather-trimmed steering wheel.

Define your own personal climate with automatic dual zone climate control. The innovative nanoe air-purifiers cleanse the air and moisturise your skin, which is why stepping out of the new Lexus ES, is just as invigorating as stepping into it.

For further individual comfort, the front seats of all ES models have adjustable lumbar support, with standard heated and ventilated seats.

At Lexus safety is of paramount importance, which is why the new Lexus ES features the most advanced passive and active safety and driver support systems available. This is the most technologically advanced Lexus ES ever, with traditional measures of comfort merged with cutting-edge technology for all-encompassing driving pleasure.

* Available on ES 300H only

Read next: 10 Dynamic Black Entrepreneurs

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3 Things Africa Must Get Right If It Wants To Leapfrog Into The 4th Industrial Revolution

Dr Sharron McPherson, who lectures on the MCom in Development Finance at the UCT Graduate School of Business, is optimistic that the coming technological revolution can benefit Africa – but that education, government buy-in and targeted support of small to medium businesses will play a critical role in determining if the continent sinks or swims.

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“The 4th Industrial Revolution (4IR) and Future Proofing are current buzz-phrases in business, but what we are really looking at is the emergence of an entirely new economy,” says Dr Sharron McPherson, who, as co-founder and executive director of the Centre for Disruptive Technologies, “has over 1 000 disruptive techies around the globe on speed dial.”

Disruptive technology, that which is significantly changing the way business operates – a literal game changer – is seen as the spearhead of 4IR and it has people scrabbling for skills that will future-proof their careers and keep them ahead of the game. It’s a topic McPherson tackled, along with the impact of technology on finance, at Finance Indaba Africa, which took place on 3 and 4 October at the Sandton Convention Centre.

“We have to look at technological acceleration and the need to upskill youth as part of a whole,” says McPherson, who has studied the market in depth on behalf of governments and corporations using a substantial team. “Change is happening so fast it is hard for any one person to be an expert.”

McPherson comes as close as anyone to the role of expert in this fast-changing field. A lecturer on the MCom in Development Finance at the UCT Graduate School of Business, she argues that a new economic paradigm is emerging, and it is not driven solely by technology, but by global pressures such as climate change – with its very real implications for food, water and energy security – booming populations and the knock-on demands on land and resources, and rising terrorism, populism and nationalism as systems get stressed and people start saying “us first”.

“What differentiates 4IR from former revolutions is the quantum of change and the convergence of global factors of a magnitude quite unprecedented in human history. It is sobering, and yet I am encouraged by the time I spend with young people and those who are investing in future generations and the future of work,” says McPherson.

Related: A Perfect Storm: Business, Creativity And The 4th Industrial Revolution

Born in the US, McPherson came to South Africa in the mid-90s armed with a doctorate degree in law from Columbia University, New York, to serve as a volunteer in the offices of legendary Constitutional Court Justice Albie Sachs in Johannesburg. She also has an honours degree in finance from the University of Toulon, France, and a BA Economics from the College of William & Mary.

“I was divorced, a single mom to a six year old, and I volunteered for two years,” she says. “I’d been working on Wall Street on mortgage-backed securitisations and I saw the light! In the mid-90s South Africa was the most exciting place on earth – the youngest constitutional democracy. I got bit by the African bug. It gets into your blood and makes it difficult to leave,” she says with a laugh.

Passionate about the continent, McPherson believes in the power of education to shift the future and wants all young people to have access to a high-quality STEM education (science, technology, engineering and maths) to ready them for 4IR.

“This is an opportunity that needs to be recognised,” she says. “Africa is uniquely positioned to leapfrog into 4IR, but we need make changes so that we can realise that promise. We have a choice to invest in the education of 200 million young Africans – it is a position of promise or peril.”

Unfortunately, as things stand, South Africa is “way down” on the list of the countries that are getting STEM education right. In an effort to democratise access to a STEM education, the Centre for Disruptive Technologies has invested a lot into the development of an artificial intelligence teaching platform that will have intuitive sensitivities when it comes to learner abilities.

But as important as investing in education is, it will not be enough to prepare youth for a world where many will not be able to get a job and will need to create their own work opportunities. The second issue that needs attention therefore, believes McPherson, is entrepreneurship and creating the right start-up ecosystem.

“We need to revisit ideas around enterprise development and how to get it right.”

One of the traps South Africa has created for itself is to bundle micro businesses with small and medium enterprises but these businesses often have vastly different needs – and prospects.

“By pooling these businesses with micro businesses you are limiting results. Small and medium businesses are the real drivers of growth and need to be specifically catered for, with defined objectives around their needs, driven strategies and allocated resources to make sure their potential is maximised. Start-ups and SME are also not the same. We need to understand and appreciated these differences if we want to develop the right ecosystems.”

This brings McPherson to her final point, the essential need for government to assume its role as a key stakeholder. “Everything we have done at the Centre for Disruptive Technologies we have done in collaboration with the private sector because we simply haven’t been able to get traction from government. To really prepare for 4IR we need meaningful private / public partnerships and African solutions,” she says.

Working with such macro challenges is all in day’s work for McPherson, who is also a keen runner, getting up between four and five most mornings to run. She also meditates – “taking time to reconnect with my values and helping me to not sweat the small stuff” – hikes, and speaks seven languages.

“I am a chronic over-achiever,” she says with a laugh. But she deems her highest achievement her daughter’s respect for her work in education and empowering women. “It is really lovely if your kid thinks that what you are doing is hot. That for me is good. I am so encouraged by the young folk who are so tech savvy, take a lot more risk than our generation and have a different compass. Their true north has a much stronger social conscience.

“It gives me hope for the future.”

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