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Franchisee Advice

Types Of Funding Available For Franchisees

If you’re interested in investing in a franchise, there are a number of funding routes available to you.

Darlene Menzies

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In South Africa, a franchise is considered a separate, specialised field of business and from a financing perspective is viewed differently to an existing business. It’s typically easier to get funding for a franchise as franchises have a proven product and they vet potential franchisees and offer support to new business owners. This support can include extensive training on running the franchise, branding and marketing, operational policies and procedures and a highly-tuned supplier network.

The reputation of the franchise will, to a large extent, dictate which finance options you choose and how easy it will be to raise the required funds.

It’s important to understand the cost of purchasing the business and the expected operating costs to work out how much finance you’ll need until the business starts to generate profits. Be clear about the upfront costs, including access to the brand, the market structure, start-up support and the set-up fee, which usually includes construction, equipment, stock and other necessary resources.

Related: 6 Great Tips For A Successful Shark Tank Pitch

Consider the operating costs, which must include management service fees and franchise marketing and advertising levies. The franchisor will advise you on the time it should take for the franchise to start generating profits. Upfront costs plus operating costs are the total amount of finance required to purchase, set up and run the franchise.

What’s available for prospective franchisees?

Franchisor Funding

Many of the large franchisors have their own funding mechanisms. These can range from their own established finance arm to funding assistance through partnerships with external lenders. Franchisors seldom fund 100% of the purchase costs; the amount of funding varies according to the size and reputation of the franchise and usually ranges from 25% to 75% of the costs.

Once a franchisor approves you as a franchisee, your chances of being approved for funding are significantly stronger. Some franchisors go a step further and suggest a business partnership with another potential franchisee who has good financial resources but less experience. Pairing experience with finance can be a useful option, but needs to be explored properly as it is a long-term partnership that must work for both parties.

Tandem Funding and Specialised Franchise Funders

South Africa’s B-BBEE legislation has led to a new option for franchise funding. It’s a particularly innovative way of quickly upskilling inexperienced potential franchisees. The franchisor funds the new franchise and retains ownership of the majority of shares in the business.

The franchisee initially purchases a small number of shares and is then mentored by the franchisor to set up and run the franchise. Profits are used to buy more shares until the franchisee has purchased all the franchise’s shares.

Specialist franchise funders are also a useful option. They typically consider a wider variety of franchises than banks and have in-depth knowledge of the industry. However, like other funders, their primary concern is to be sure that the loan will be repaid within the required period.

Related: Expansion Funding Options For Your Growing Business

Franchise Funding from Banks

franchise-funding-from-banksAll of the large banks have specialised franchise funding departments. Their approval rate for funding franchises is generally higher than for independent businesses.

Banks will expect you to provide a sizable contribution toward the purchase of the franchise and funding is dependent on proof that the business will be able to repay the loan.

Other factors they consider are the location of the business and its proximity to competitors and catchment markets, your level of business experience, your credit record and the amount and type of support offered by the franchisor. The higher the level of support, the less the risk to the funder of the business under-performing.

If the franchisor is willing to enter into a joint venture with you to partially fund the purchase, the bank will consider this positively as it means the franchisor has a vested interest in helping you to succeed.

Government Franchise Funding

All of the government funding agencies offer franchise funding primarily to encourage black entrepreneurs to enter into the franchise business. For example, the National Empowerment Fund considers funding based on a minimum of 50,1% black shareholding, provided that the black shareholders are actively involved in managing the business.

They prefer to fund well-established franchises, fund up to R10 million and expect to exit within seven years, so you’ll need detailed projections to show that the loan can be repaid within that period. Ithala Bank considers funding for KZN-based approved franchisees who do not have collateral.

Related: Should You Purchase An Existing Franchise?

What funders expect from you

Lenders expect you to provide detailed information that will enable them to assess the risks of lending to the franchise. This means they require a detailed business plan, comprehensive and well- substantiated financial projections and full details of the franchise, its agreement terms and the levels of support they will provide. They will also need details of start-up costs; for example, construction, set-up costs, equipment and other resources required to establish the franchise.

Franchise lenders expect you to have concluded discussions with the franchisor and want to know that you have been approved. This pre-approval means that there is less risk to them. You’ll also be expected to provide feasibility studies from the franchisor.

The purchase of a franchise requires an injection of your own cash and if you are borrowing money, you’ll probably need to provide collateral. You’ll need a statement of personal assets and liabilities for each of the directors, a good credit record and detailed CVs of the owners to show the required business experience.

Choose wisely

The more well-known the franchise, the higher the price, so do your homework before applying for finance. Understand the full cost of starting and running the business to make sure you aren’t in for future surprises. In particular, work out your current liquidity status.

Keep a small contingency fund available for unexpected expenses, so don’t invest all available capital in the venture.

Shop around. Compare finance institutions’ offerings to make sure you get the best deal. In the case of less expensive franchises, consider working with a couple of lenders; for example, an asset funder to fund equipment needs and a franchise funder for the start-up and working capital costs.

Darlene Menziesis Chief Executive Officer – Finfind. The World Economic Forum named Darlene Menzies one of six Top Female Tech Breakthrough Entrepreneurs in Africa for 2017. She is a technology innovator and serial entrepreneur with 15 years’ corporate IT experience with ABSA Bank and ICT outsource giant BCX. Since leaving corporate employment in 2001, she has established several successful technology businesses and has firsthand experience in what it takes to start and grow a successful enterprise. She is a public speaker, a media spokesperson and recognised expert on the SME sector.

Franchisee Advice

6 Things You Need To Know About Profit And Cashflow

Why your business needs both and how to check.

Richard Mukheibir

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In the heat of the action as you build your business or launch a new line, it’s easy to hope some aspects will take care of themselves. It’s especially tempting to fall into that trap with your accounts if you don’t like dealing with figures.

Despite having a B. Comm degree, I’m happy to admit that I don’t really like accounts. I much prefer strategies, management and business development. Fortunately, my co-founder and our Chief Financial Officer Peter Forshaw tirelessly keeps us on track financially – and his message to our franchisees is always that in your own business, you must understand enough of the financial basics to know whether your business is swimming or sinking…

It’s so important that we include this as part of our franchisee training. To get you started, here’s what Engela van Loggerenberg, our Group Financial Manager, tells new franchisees:

  1. Cashflow and profit aren’t the same: You can’t track one and assume the other shows the same pattern. There is no natural correlation between the two – your cashflow can be positive and you can be making a loss or your cashflow can be negative but you’re making a profit.
  2. Cash keeps you going: It’s vital to have money available in your business so you need to be generating enough cash to pay operating expenses. Otherwise you could be making a profit but not be able to pay staff wages. If so, you will either have to put in some of your own money or take a loan to keep your cash flowing and your business afloat.
  3. Time for a checkup: Both cashflow and profit are important to a business – but you can’t do anything without cash which is why you have to manage your cashflow carefully. Check your profit monthly but your cashflow daily. This will alert you to problems in the making so you can head them off. You will see if your clients are overdue in paying their accounts with you, for example. If they fall behind, this could in turn squeeze your ability to pay your operating expenses, which is why cashflow monitoring is such an important tool to keep your business afloat.
  4. Different perspectives: Remember when you look at your figures that profit figures are a result of what has already happened and are usually reported with a time lag of a month. Cashflow is a snapshot of what is happening in your business now and will have an impact on profit figures in the months to come.
  5. Know what you’re looking for: What you need to know are your net, not gross, figures. For net cashflow that is your incoming cash less your outgoing cash for the period. So if you are receiving more than you are spending, you will be left with money in the bank to meet future expenses. Similarly, your total sales less direct costs make up your gross profit. Deduct all your operating expenses from the gross profit to calculate whether your business is making a net profit.
  6. Make the most of your cash: Take pressure off yourself by keeping spare cash for future expenses such as VAT and taxes in a good interest-bearing account such as a money market, call or investment account. Then set up reminders ahead of time to arrange to withdraw the sum required.

Remember that any system is only as good as the person operating it. So if like me, figures aren’t your thing, make sure that you have someone at your side who can manage them for you.

Read next: 4 Factors To Consider Before Converting Your Independent Business Into A Franchise

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Franchisee Advice

3 Ways To Ensure Your Loyalty Programme is Working Hard For You

Plastic cards are making way for app-based loyalty programmes. Is your franchise keeping up with the digitally savvy consumer?

Diana Albertyn

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The average consumer today is a member of at least five of the 100-plus loyalty programmes in South Africa, according to a 2017 study by Nielsen. As the loyalty playing field becomes more cluttered and competitive, what are you doing to ensure each one of your franchisees are catering to customer needs when it comes to loyalty?

Mobility. It’s not the newest buzzword, but it is useful for attracting customers who don’t want to lose loyalty points because their card is lost or not with them. Ailsa Wingfield, Nielsen’s Head of Emerging Markets: Thought Leadership, says that as adoption of non-traditional payment methods increases, loyalty programmes also need to introduce payment type flexibility.

“Mobile payment platforms will increasingly deliver an opportunity for loyalty-programme engagement with consumers, providing a convenient and personalised way for programme members and retailers to engage with one another all along the path to purchase.” – Ailsa Wingfield Nielsen Head of Emerging Markets Thought Leadership.

Related: 11 Ways To Double Your Customers In 4 Weeks

Have you considered what role tech could play in your current loyalty programme? Here are three ways to apply digital enhancements that appeal to present and potential customers: 

1. Offer differentiation through more options

Research has concluded that the loyalty programmes devised by retailers and franchises are not innovative enough to capture the attention of the youth – Millennials and Gen Z. it’s time to diversify your rewards offering. But how?

If your customer base is predominantly younger, being omni-present is key, according to the Truth Loyalty Whitepaper: “An omni-channel approach will not only meet the demands of the younger customer, it will also allow your business to combine intelligence on shopping, search and web behaviour history to assist you in identifying when to offer an in-store promotion, extend a seasonal offer or make a product recommendation through the appropriate channels.”

Implementing a digital loyalty campaign is also a smart way to reduce costs. Coffee shop franchise Mugg & Bean’s Generous Rewards App and partnership with Vitality Active Rewards, means members can earn cash-back rewards to spend on their favourites. Just downloading the app earns you a R25 voucher.

2. Use your tools to engage more

A crucial mistake most franchisors make is not communicating consistently with their loyalty programme members once they’ve signed up and increased numbers. They spend a lot of time recruiting customers to join, but expect them to prompt cashiers for points’ balances and produce their cards independently in their various locations.

“You have gained permission to talk to your customers and created the opportunity to collect enormous amounts of valuable data. Use this to your advantage by creating meaningful and relevant engagement initiatives and communications across your customers’ lifecycle,” advises Truth, a boutique consultancy business specialising in customer centricity and loyalty programme strategy and design.

When enhancing your engagement strategy, Accenture advises that you keep the following in mind:

  • 54% of South African consumers are loyal to brands that actively engage them to help design or co-create products or services.
  • 57% are loyal to organisations that present them with new experiences, products or services.
  • 47% are loyal to brands that engage them in ‘multi-sensory’ experiences, using new technologies such as virtual reality or augmented reality.

Related: 3 Ways To Stop Taking Your Most Loyal Customers For Granted

3. Keep the experience simple

Review your loyalty programme. Honestly. Then ask yourself if you’ve made your programme too complicated for the layman. If your answer is ‘no’ or even ‘maybe’, how can your target consumer ever reap the full rewards of this programme if they don’t understand the rewards on offer and how to redeem them?

Changing rules too often is the first complication to go. No matter which one of your stores they choose to shop at, the redemption and earning process should be simple enough to keep members interested and engaged in the programme. Make sure you keep your programme simple and transparent.

“Clicks made a simple but fundamental change to its redemption process – paper-vouchers were replaced with virtual points that can be redeemed as cash-back when you swipe your card at the till. While Clicks and Dis-Chem are among only a handful of brands that do this, it’s a sure-fire mechanism for increasing redemption,” said Amanda Cromhout, founder and CEO of Truth.

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Franchisee Advice

3 Crucial Considerations For New Multi-unit Franchisees

Your marked success as a single-unit franchisee has led to the choice to multiply your achievement. But do you know what it really takes to move from owner-operator, to multi-outlet operator?

Diana Albertyn

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Multi-unit franchise ownership is a brilliant way to grow your business portfolio, once you’re successfully running your single location. Once you get the hang of being franchise business owner, adding one or a few more units could be the next logical step.

“The risk with having one store is higher than if you have more than one store, as the stores support one another. When the one is down the other one is up,” says multi-unit Montagu franchise owner Pierre Lombard.

You’ve probably already realised this lucrative option and are getting acquainted with multi-unit franchising. As this is new territory, you may want to consider these methods to multiply your success.

1. Make more discerning recruitment choices

When you opened shop at your first location, you were probably warned against hiring a manager, because they may not be as invested in the success of your business as you are. Now that you growing, you have no choice, so you need to be selective in your decision of who’s going to run the show when you’re not around.

Related: 3 Employment Best Practices To Apply In Your Franchise

The best way to ensure consistency in service and quality in each location is to always put culture fit over ability. While a certain level of skill is required to carry out the tasks required of a manager, attitude trumps aptitude when selecting capability running your locations.

“Place one of your outstanding managers or staff from your current store in the new one and have them train up any new staff,” suggests Francesca Nicasio, Retail Expert at Vend.

“That way the practices and attitude that you’ve cultivated in your business will continue into your new store.”

2. You need tech to help you be everywhere

Not only are Cloud technologies enabling franchise owners to scale quickly, easily and more affordably compared to on-site solutions, but these advancements mean you can remotely optimise inventory across all your locations, get a more accurate assessment each store’s performance and better understand your business – all you need is an Internet connection.

With the variety of Cloud-based solutions available today, you’re also able to connect your sales, staff, and customer information to give customers a seamless experience at all locations. You’re also able to receive alerts on low stock levels and automatically have it.

3. Set and stick to a specific standard

As a franchisee, consistency is standard practice. But that’s easy done as a single-unit owner than when running multiple locations. To make your mini network more manageable, ensure all your store understand brand standards beyond the operation manual.

Related: Multi-Unit Franchising Growing In South Africa

“Naturally, you have your franchise systems’ operations manual and procedures but the way you personally want to stamp your mark on customer experience, for instance, needs to be documented too,” experts at Inside Franchise Business advise.

Doing this reduces the stress of continually keeping tabs on staff, and frees you up to collect and collate the data you need to make smarter decisions faster.

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