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Make your Franchise Stand Out

Figure out what makes your franchise different and sell that to franchise buyers.

Entrepreneur

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If you’re interested in starting a franchise, you have a lot of company. With many franchisors for franchisees to choose from, how do you stand out from the crowd? How do you create a unique selling proposition (USP) that will allow you to compete?

Finding Your Small Pond

When facing the task of creating this USP, you should start by understanding that every buyer’s universe is different. No franchise buyer would ever attempt to analyse the thousands of franchisors in the marketplace.

Some will start by choosing a specific industry segment in which they are interested or that capitalises on their skills or experience. They may narrow the list based on how they examine the marketplace – using brokers, trade shows, franchise directories or the Internet.

Some will be interested only in established franchisors, while others will be looking to get in on the ‘ground floor’ of a franchise poised for explosive growth. Many will eliminate franchisors quickly, based on size of investment and their available capital. In short, every buyer’s process will be both different and smaller than the universe of all available franchise concepts.

For you, as a new franchisor, this is good news. Although most franchise buyers are not fishing in your pond, the buyers that are, will be fishing in a much smaller body of water. That means an understanding of your specific pond, and what fish are in it, should be the first order of business.

Armed with this knowledge, you must then narrow your buyer profile as much as possible.

Part of this process can be intuitive, but more often the only way to obtain this understanding is research – talking to either your own franchisees or those of your closest competitors for insight into buyer motivation, media and the specific message that will sell to your audience.

The Many Sales of Franchising

The savvy franchisor also instinctively understands that there is not simply one sale to make, but rather four separate sales that each franchise sales person must undertake. Prospects are likely to ask themselves four basic questions:

  • Should I go into business for myself?
  • Should I go into the widget business?
  • Should I go it alone or buy a franchise?
  • Should I buy your widget franchise?

The answer to the first question, of course, is a mainstay of any franchise sales presentation. But this answer will be similar for most franchisors.

The answer to the second question will need to be woven into your sales and marketing strategies. To answer it, you need to understand and develop the selling proposition for the widget industry, but chances are it is not ‘unique’ but a shared message promulgated by all your closest direct competitors. Only when you’re in the enviable position of being the only player in a market segment can this question yield a true USP.

The third question offers little room for uniqueness. Do you offer any support services not offered by other franchises? Do you provide guarantees? For most franchise concepts, while the question is integral to franchise sales, the answer will be similar across many franchises.

So the core of the USP lies not in differentiating a concept from the vast herd of franchisors, but in differentiating it from your closest direct competitors.

Putting the ‘U’ in USP

A behemoth now, the McDonald’s juggernaut started with a single location. Before they captured the American consumer’s ‘mind share’ for fast-food burgers, they had dozens of competitors.

So why was Burger King successful while so many others failed? The main factor can be boiled down to a single sentence: “Have it your way.” Burger King positioned itself to be different from McDonald’s, not just a ‘me-too’ operation. It was positioned in such a way that McDonald’s could not respond competitively – because in order to do so, McDonald’s would have had to revisit its entire kitchen operations.

Finding Your Differentiator

There are a number of ways in which a company can differentiate itself. For those who are first to enter a new industry or niche, the most dominant position to seek is that of market leader. To achieve that status, a company must grow rapidly enough to achieve brand recognition.

For the rest of us, we need to become the best at something – either the biggest, cheapest, fastest, easiest or hottest. A company can try to be two of these things at once, but those that try to be ‘all things to all people’ quickly find they  only succeed at being mediocre at everything – a guarantee of long-term failure.

Aside from the concept itself, you can also differentiate yourself by size of the initial investment, target market, geography, quality of services provided to franchisees and franchise structure. A cautionary note: those taking the cheapest route should focus on minimising the franchisee’s investment, not the royalty structure.

Regardless of where this differentiation occurs, “stake out” the areas where you want to excel, develop a USP around those areas and acknowledge the areas in which you’ll allow competition.

Entrepreneur Magazine is South Africa's top read business publication with the highest readership per month according to AMPS. The title has won seven major publishing excellence awards since it's launch in 2006. Entrepreneur Magazine is the "how-to" handbook for growing companies. Find us on Google+ here.

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Franchisors

3 Core Strategies For Building Successful Franchise Organisations

How to attract potential franchisees to invest in your business.

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The most common questions I hear from franchisors are usually related to growth strategy. In other words, what are the core strategies that differentiate the successful from the mediocre?

Strong leadership determines the overall success of the organisation, but how can this be defined or broken down to actionable strategies? People often ask me how we created a franchise growth strategy that enabled us to grow to 150 units in less than three years. This is the secret sauce! When I coach my franchise executive clients, we begin with three core strategies.

As I described in my book, Franchise Bible 8th Edition, The Upside Down Pyramid strategy sets the pace for everything since it is a core belief. This will get the company moving in the right direction and keep the focus strong as franchise owners are added to the community. The Three Decision Lens Philosophy then kicks in to make sure the company stays on track and makes good solid decisions that will benefit the franchisees and the overall growth of the organisation. Lastly, the Franchise Glue creates a strategy for long-term maintenance that inspires aggressive growth and peak performance.

Related: Selling Your First Franchise? Consider These Key Pointers

The following are the core leadership strategies that I identified in Entrepreneur Magazine’s Franchise Bible 8th Edition.

The Upside Down Pyramid

This strategy is a paradigm shift from the common corporate organizational structure. Typically, you see the leader at the top of the pyramid governing over the team members, which trickles down to the employees and eventually the customers.

Franchising is a very unique business model and is very different from a traditional corporation. The primary difference is that the franchise owners are independent business operators, not employees. The Upside Down Pyramid strategy flips that model on its head by placing the leader(s) at the bottom, bearing the weight of the company infrastructure on their shoulders. Franchise owners then are viewed more like the customer and supported accordingly.

The Three Decision Lens

Every decision a franchisor makes has Legal, Practical and Political implications, so these three factors have to be considered whenever a decision is made. Making good decisions is mission critical to the successful growth of a franchise organisation. Many franchisors have stumbled or even failed because of poor decisions that negatively impacted their franchisees.

The Three Decision Lens Philosophy is tool that enables a franchisor to consider the total impact of their choices before the decision is made.

The Franchise Glue

Franchise Glue is everything a franchisor does that sticks the franchisees to them. Ongoing support and training, buying power, technology tools, innovation, events and other programmes and systems that endear the franchise owners to the brand. These are the reasons that franchise owners stay with the brand and have no problem paying ongoing royalties.

Once these three strategies are implemented and the leadership spoke is in place, we can build the remaining spokes which are marketing, operations, finance and technology to head for the “hockey stick” growth of 100 units and beyond.

Related: 3 Ways You Can Innovate And Improve As A Franchisee

Like any other business strategy, the most important factor is your willingness to buy in and execute. The best game plan in the world is useless if it is not put in to action. Building a healthy and thriving franchise organisation is much like exercise. Long term and consistent exercise programmes generally lead to a healthy person.

I will be posting a series of articles that will break these three strategies down in more detail including real world examples and tips for implementation. This will allow you and your team to focus on one strategy at a time and work on implementation steps. Stay tuned over the next several weeks and try working these strategies in to your franchise business model and see how it impacts your franchise community.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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Franchisors

The Secret Sauce To Great Franchise Leadership

The upside down pyramid puts the franchisee at the center of everyone’s effort. Success follows.

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I am often asked to share the secrets of franchise success with my clients and audiences of franchise executives as I travel the country spreading the Franchise Bible strategies.

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The most critical of the three core strategies is what I call the upside down pyramid strategy. This is more than a catch phrase or slogan. It must become a true belief in order for this strategy to affect a franchise organization for the better. Lets start with some basic facts to clarify.

What it is                              

The upside down pyramid is a servant leadership model that makes sure that franchise owners always come first. This must be genuine for all members of your team.

Related: 3 Challenges To Establishing A Franchise System And How To Overcome Them

Franchising is different than any other business model in this way. A franchise organisation simply cannot thrive unless the entire corporate team is on board with this commitment. If it’s not, it would be like a medical team where some members simply did not care about healing the patient. It is a non-negotiable.

What it is not

This strategy is not a hand-holding philosophy that rewards lazy or non-compliant franchisees. One of the exciting outcomes from this system is seeing the franchise owners step up and go above and beyond the call of duty when they feel truly appreciated, valued and respected by the franchisor. I have seen amazing things happen from franchise communities that felt connected and part of the bigger picture.

The challenge

Many franchise organisation executives have a lot of experience as traditional employers so they tend to try to “manage” their franchise owners as though they are employees. In most cases this is the beginning of the most common problem that I call the traditional pyramid model with the boss on top.

The key to remember at this point is the reality that the franchise owners are not employees of the company. In fact, the exact opposite is actually the case. The franchisees invested their hard earned money into the franchise company and pay an ongoing royalty as well. This means that they are the customers of the franchisor and the franchisor should value them as such.

How do you implement this strategy?

I have seen the good, the bad and the ugly in the franchise world. I can usually sense the company culture pretty quickly when I am among the franchise executive and support team. It is no surprise that the most successful franchise brands have a pretty solid grasp on this strategy. Here are some tips to get you started:

  • Train: Introduce this strategy to your executive and support team and give them the opportunity to ask questions and learn. Remember that this may be a bit of a paradigm shift for some, so they may need time to get it down.
  • Reinforce: Use ongoing reminders during your meetings, training sessions and conferences to keep the ball rolling. Your system must be based on things that you and your team will do consistently for a long period of time. A short burst of change followed by a return to the former status quo doesn’t work, so make sure you can commit and stick with it.
  • Insist on buy-in: Everyone on your executive, training and support teams must buy in to this commitment for it to work. You have heard that one bad apple spoils the whole bunch. This is very true within a franchise organisation. You may have to replace team members if they refuse to genuinely commit.

Related: Col’ Cacchio: A Passion For Pizza

Leadership tip

You have also heard the saying that the fish starts to rot at the head. The common denominator that I see in failing franchise organisations is almost always due to poor leadership. I often say that a decent business model with great leadership will usually thrive and a great business model with lousy leadership will usually fail.

Don’t feel bad if you are not the best leader for your business. I have seen business founders step aside and hire in leadership experts to run with their creation. Knowing that someone else is a better leader than you for your franchise organisation is a sign of great discernment and wisdom. If you are not sure just ask your franchise owners to give you a grade as the leader. I asked a franchise CEO recently if he would get an A from his franchisees and he said, “Probably not.” I advised him to get back to work and make sure that he can earn that A.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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Franchisors

Get Your Franchise Running Smoothly – Even When You’re Not There

Does the thought of taking time off from your franchise outlet make you nervous? Then you have to learn to run your business instead of letting it run you.

Diana Albertyn

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“A sign of a successful business is one that can operate without your physical presence 24/7,” says Brad Sugars, start-up expert, author and founder of ActionCOACH. While your franchise systems and operations are designed to run smoothly and consistently, is your staff trained to be productive in your absence?

“Franchises are already by nature systematised operations, so it boils down to how you as a business owner hire and train people to get the necessary jobs done,” says Sugars.

If you know a sick day will cause havoc in your store, an assessment of how you’re running your business is needed. Are you really running a successful franchise if things fall about without your supervision? Take a step back and consider the following steps to manage your franchise without it controlling your life. Pretty soon you could book that vacation.

Determine your role in the franchise

Are you managing the franchise, taking orders, doing admin and handling every other aspect of the business? Then you’re not hiring the right people, because those roles should be filled by people who can be left to carry them out unsupervised.

Related: How To Write An Operations Manual For Your Franchise

“And if you don’t have the right people for the job then it might be time to start hiring, so you can free up your franchise’s most valuable resource – you,” says Pieter Scholtz, co-Master Licensee for ActionCOACH in Southern Africa.

“You need to get an idea of how you can hire people to take repetitive or administrative tasks away from you. Ask yourself: ‘Do I really need to be doing this?’” says Sugars. Your business cannot run optimally if you’re the single most-knowledgeable and capable person there.

Lead with clarity

You have long-term goals for your business, perhaps even acquiring more locations and running multiple units. While growth is good, you need to share the load and ensure everyone employed in your business is working towards the same goals, otherwise, it’ll be difficult to get there. Sugars suggests asking yourself the following:

  • How will you make your vision a reality?
  • What makes you different from other franchisees and business owners?
  • What kind of team do you want to recruit and create?
  • How does all of this deliver value to your customer?

Conveying your vision can help ensure employees know how to get to the end-goal faster and more efficiently.

Related: 3 Steps To Ensure Your Franchisees Flourish Your Support System

Plan for long-term cash flow

Loyal customers ensure a constant flow of cash through the franchise and this requires exceptional service and the building of strong relationships. “Target your top-spending customers and establish a good relationship with them for long-term cash flow,” Sugars suggests.

Although the broader campaigns are covered by the marketing fee you’re paying to your franchisor, it’s wise to focus on your local’s tastes and suggestions when looking to deliver an experience worth returning for.

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