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Researching a Franchise

Do your Homework Before Buying a Franchise

Franchised businesses have a higher success rate, however more homework is necessary to ensure that the business being bought is a profitable, going concern with a great future.

Entrepreneur

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Taking over an existing franchised business as a going concern requires research, homework and decisions based on sound advice. Many people entering franchised businesses are doing so for the first time, and are often using hard-won savings or accrued pension funds to realise their dreams of independence.

Getting the Right Advice and Support

Banks are well placed to offer advice on finance and also offer potential purchasers peace of mind by having extensive knowledge of which franchisors give franchisees the highest levels of support.

The extensive knowledge of franchising is backed by the ability to help a prospective business purchaser take a 360-degree view of their financial status and offer them specialist support from other financial areas. This gives clients the advantages of a streamlined, integrated financial base and easy control over all their needs.

What is not generally known is that many franchisors require operators to refurbish their outlets every five years. When making an offer on a business, it is vitally important to ascertain when a revamp is next due. Failure to do so could find you paying for a business without knowing that major costs are waiting around the corner.

Things to Consider When Buying

Purchase and sale agreements are vital. They must comply with specific legislative criteria such as the Insolvency Act. It is also required, for instance, that advertisements are carried in newspapers of all languages for 30 days prior to a sale to ensure that creditors who may have done work for the original owner do not end up knocking on your door later to demand payment.

The major research begins with the banking aspects and the actual value of the business assets. A business may have many fittings such as shelves, freezers and catering equipment. The stated value may be several million rand. What may not be realised by the purchaser, however, is the fact that over time these assets depreciate.

Their value drops and, because of wear and tear, and if the purchase of the business is made late in the lifecycle of the assets, they may be worth very little.

Getting an approved valuation from an expert should therefore be the very first step in the purchase process. It is essential that a valuation is made on site. Desktop valuations where only information on hand is used without leaving the office should be avoided. Attention should be paid to all equipment ensuring that it is all in good working order and there are no faults that could be expensive to rectify later.

Ownership of assets should also be clearly ascertained. In some cases specific equipment may be owned by the franchisor, rather than the franchisee. They should not therefore be included in the overall value of the business. It should always be borne in mind that a correct list of assets is invaluable when applying for bank finance, as it provides the bank with security against a loan.

A goodwill payment should also not be included as a business asset. A medium-term loan or a business-term loan should rather be considered.

Stock in hand is also not considered as an asset. This is because some franchisors hold non-negotiable general bonds over the stock. The stock is owned by the franchisor until payment has been made by the franchisee.

A Great Future

Buying a going concern is also not simply a case of signing an instalment agreement sale.

Essentially, when financing an existing going concern, Standard Bank uses a ‘sale and lease-back’ mechanism to complete the transaction. The timing of this transaction has got to be just right as ownership has to pass from the old franchisee to the new franchisee and documentation must be signed as ownership passes across.

When making a move into a franchised business the question of buying a new or existing outlet is obviously top-of-mind. Buying an established business that has a solid customer base and a financial history may be regarded as first prize. It is more likely to be so if the deal is approached with caution.

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Researching a Franchise

Maximise Your Social Media Reach This Holiday Season

Quick and cost-effective, social media is your best tool to reach target markets when it matters most – during the holidays.

Diana Albertyn

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It’s not just the end of the year that can be lucrative for businesses. School holidays and other major breaks during the year present consumers with more time to spend shopping. Why not ensure money is spent at your franchise by capitalising on the minimal cost and maximum exposure of social media?

You don’t have to create entirely new deals or promotions from what you may already have running on your store, but find a way to make it special for your social media followers, suggests Kelly Mason, marketer at Customer Paradigm.

Holiday campaigns on Twitter, benefitting from popular hashtags, streaming live content, and receiving information instead of just distributing it via social media are just some of the ways to stay ahead of the competition.

Related: Why Your Business’ Social Media Marketing Strategy Is Probably Wrong

Know your customers well

The first step to attracting customers and getting them to complete a sale is understanding their customer journey.

“Being able to document where they spend their time online, which social channels they use most, and what they’re reading or watching on those channels is a huge plus. Finding that crucial information is fairly easy to do, thanks to modern-day marketing tools and resources,” advises Paul Herman, ‎VP: Product and Solutions Enablement Group, at Sprinklr, a unified customer experience management platform for enterprises.

The better you understand your customers, the easier it is to reach them through a campaign optimised for their interests.

Master social listening

You could be using social media all wrong in the run up to all your holiday campaigns. Perhaps it’s time you used this platform to listen to your customers?

“Through social listening, marketers can identify major trends and product keywords in their industries,” says Herman. “For instance, knowing those keywords can help marketers identify which social platforms are more popular for a target audience. With that information, they can make smarter decisions about where to spend their money and which products or services to promote on each platform.”

Related: 10 Laws Of Social Media Marketing

Use the information gathered to determine what customers like about your product, what they dislike about it, and how you can improve upon it so they can buy more of it. The more of this data you collect, the better and more effective your interactions with customers will be.

Try something new

50% of consumers look for a video of the product they want to buy before going to an ecommerce store to buy it, according to a 2016 Google survey. “Video can be an extremely effective way to get your customers to take action – in this case, to make a purchase with your store,” adds Mason.

Video adverts are often used as an experimental tool in social marketing and switching it up on platforms such as Facebook Live, Instagram Live, Instagram Stories, or Snapchat – depending on your brand’s activity and your audiences’ interests – can help attract customers during seasonal periods.

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Researching a Franchise

Selling Your First Franchise? Consider These Key Pointers

You’re ready to franchise your business, but who do you sell to and how? Your first few franchisees may be the hardest to acquire, but the process will be smoother if you get some basics right.

Diana Albertyn

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Business experience gained running your independent brand will come in handy, but looking for franchisees is a different ballgame. “We have to attract the right people in enough numbers to make the difference; and, the key to more leads is to have a multi-prong strategy to marketing,” says franchise strategist and expansion expert Lizette Pirtle.

Using media (social, or otherwise), trained experts in franchise sales, and keeping in mind that whoever you sell to will become an extension of your brand, are important considerations before selling your to first franchisee:

1. Use (all) media wisely

Website marketing, print advertising and social media are just some of the many different ways to attract potential owners to your franchise. But the most cost-effect of the three may be a ‘tweet’ or ‘post’ away, says former Director of Marketing at the International Franchise Association and owner of Burris Branding and Marketing, Jack Burris.

Related: To Buy Into A Franchise Or Purchase A Licence? 3 Factors To Consider

“Three out of four people using the Internet are either on Facebook or LinkedIn or Twitter or all of them. Take advantage of social media,” he says.

“There’s typically no cost to play in the space except for the time that you need to invest to build your brand with a social media presence.”

2. Seek out franchise coaches or brokers

While this is a more traditional method of making reliable franchise sales, it’s a great way to form lasting associations that will take you beyond your first few sales. “Using broker networks is a great way to supplement your own efforts. However, you must spend time developing relationships with these people if you want to get results,” advises Pirtle. “Don’t think that just listing your opportunity with them is sufficient.”

Franchise coaches and brokers have multiple options for potential franchisees, so to put yourself high on their list of consideration when prospects enquire, you have to form memorable relationships.

Related: 3 Factors To Focus On When Opening Your First Franchise

3. Always consider the bigger picture

Out of all the people your marketing efforts attract, always keep in mind that few will check all the boxes and compromising could cost you in the long run.

“The franchise relationship is a long-term one. If you’re going to be successful as a franchisor, you should start with the attitude that every franchisee will be someone who you’ll have to live with for years to come. And nowhere is this philosophy more important than when awarding your first franchise,” says Mark Siebert, CEO of the iFranchise Group, a franchise consulting organisation.

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Researching a Franchise

3 Factors To Focus On When Opening Your First Franchise

To become a successful franchisee, there’s lots more to learn. Take notes and this will be an adventure still with its challenges, but less stress.

Diana Albertyn

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Experts and those who’ve gone through the launching, managing and successful running of a franchise will tell you that owning a franchise can be just as risky as owning an independent small business – and it doesn’t get easier after signing on the dotted line. But that doesn’t mean it isn’t worth giving franchising a shot.

“The hardest part of being a franchisee is learning and adopting all the processes that exist in the brand you’re buying into. But it’s important that a customer can walk into any franchisee’s property across the country and have the exact same experience,” says Jeff Chew, Pizza Factory franchisee.

With that in mind, remember the financial, emotional and physical investment you’ve made in this new venture and let it fuel your success, from before you even serve your first customer

1. Financial and intellectual wealth

Don’t buy into a franchise where you might be undercapitalised, advises Paul Durant, a Junk King franchisee.

Related: Expansion Funding Options For Your Growing Business

Keep in mind that running a new business isn’t challenging only mentally strenuous, but financially too, because you’re not always immediately profitable. Ensure you have enough runway for a few years at a loss or minimal profit.

“I did not do a thorough job in my initial research and discovery calls. I used a lot of my own assumptions and luckily they were fairly close,” recalls Durant.

“I would, however, suggest that you ask very detailed questions during the discovery process and listen carefully to the responses. Often what is not said is equally as important as what is said.”

2. Remember the purpose of the manual

The point of buying into the concept you’ve chosen is to ensure success based on a roadmap that’s already been drawn out for you. Straying from this plan unnecessarily is a shortcut to failure. This doesn’t mean you cannot make changes, but always ensure your growth is where it needs to be by following the system completely.

Franchisee Mark Arduino thought he was taking the advice he’d been given countless times: Just follow the system. But he quickly realised he wasn’t when all the franchise-specific training he’d been through was forgotten in favour of easier shortcuts.

“Then I realised my mistake. I came to see that it’s very user friendly. I’m sorry I didn’t use it from the start!” he says.

Related: How To Choose The Right Finance For Your Business Or Property Portfolio Expansion

If you think you have a better way of doing something detailed in the franchisee manual, do your research. Your decision should follow a discussion with your franchisor, then align to the business plan.

3. Learn at every opportunity

It’s great that you have previous experience in business. It’s a huge bonus that could put you ahead of other franchisees in your network. But, always be willing to learn and put your hand up or open a book if you’re not sure. A vast business background doesn’t guarantee automatic success as a franchisee, so be open to learning from others.

“I have learned more from two of the franchisees in my area than I could ever have imagined and I owe my early success in large part to their willingness to help,” says Jeff Steele, a CMIT Solutions franchisee.

It may sometimes seem like you can do it all on your own, but even when you feel you can do anything, you cannot do everything. That’s why you joined a franchise that (hopefully) offers good support structure.

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