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Government Funding

Government Funding and Grants for Small Businesses

Your much needed capital investment could come from government funding and grants. Here is a comprehensive guide to government funding available in South Africa.

Nicole Crampton

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Many new small businesses go through the struggle of finding capital to start-up of expand their businesses. Government funding and grants can be a worthwhile way to get the funds that you need.

There are a lot of important things you need to be aware of such as: Strict criteria, a lot of paperwork and maybe even a very long wait. It is worth it in the end so have a look and see which government funding and grants you qualify for.

What are government grants?

This is when a project or initiative is awarded government funding for some or all of its financial support. The business grants do not need to be repaid or accrue interest and have strict guidelines for application. Government funding is linked with efforts such as black economic empowerment, job creation and developing the economy.

Here is a list of some of the government grants available for business funding in South Africa:

Contents:

  1. Automotive Investment Scheme (AIS)
  2. Black Business Supplier Development Programme (BBSDP)
  3. Clothing and Textile Competitiveness Improvement Programme (CTCIP)
  4. Critical Infrastructure Programme (CIP)
  5. Film Incentive Programme
  6. Business Process Services (BPS)
  7. Capital Projects Feasibility Programme (CPFP)
  8. Support Programme for Industrial Innovation (SPII)
  9. National Youth Development Agency (NYDA)
  10. National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI)

DTI-Logo

DTI business grants are responsible for actively encouraging small businesses. The DTI is actively searching for new business owners, specifically those who will positively affect South Africa’s economy with an emphasis on valuable job creation.

The DTI business grants provide financial support to various economic activities, including manufacturing, business competitiveness, export development, market access and provide a channel for foreign direct investment. The following are some of this department’s latest programmes:


1. Automotive Investment Scheme (AIS)

automotive-vehicle

This business grant is designed to grow the automotive sector. By investing in new and replacement models, and components, which will increase production volumes, sustain and increase employment, as well as strengthen the automotive value chain.

Qualifying for the grant

These types of grants are aimed at:

  • Light motor vehicle manufacturers: That either have accomplished or will accomplish, a minimum of 50 000 annual units of production per plant, within a period of three years
  • Component or deemed component manufacturers: Which fall under the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) supply chain
  • Light motor vehicle manufacturer supply chains: Who will reach at least 25% of total entity turnover or R10 million by the end of the first full year of commercial production whether they are situated locally or internationally.

Contact information:

  • Working Hours: Monday – Friday 08h00 until 17h00
  • National callers: 0861 843 384
  • Enquiries can be sent to the following e-mail address: contactus@thedti.gov.za
  • Find more information here.

2. Black Business Supplier Development Programme (BBSDP)

african-business-manThe DTI offers non-repayable grants of up to R1 million to ensure your business can boost its competitive edge and its sustainability. The aims of these business grants are to expand existing businesses as well as employ additional people.

Be aware: These business grants do not assist start-ups

The R1 million grants are divided into R800 000 specifically for tools, machinery and equipment. The outstanding R200 000 is then used specifically for business development and training. In order to improve:

  • Business corporate governance
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Productivity
  • Use of modern technology

6 Points you need to qualify for these grants:

  1. CIPC registered company or cc
  2. 50.1% or more black owned (Black, Indian or Coloured)
  3. Management team is 50% Black
  4. Must have been trading for at least one year and have financial statements to prove turnover
  5. Turnover must be between R250 000 and R35 million per annum
  6. Must have valid SARS tax clearance and IRT14 SARS document.

Document checklist for these grants:

  • CIPC Company registration documents (proof of ownership and shareholding)
  • Certified ID of all Directors/ members
  • Certified ID of all managers/ staff to be trained (if applicable)
  • Certified financial statements for latest financial year (three years if available)
  • Management accounts for current year
  • Valid SARS tax clearance (with 3 months to expiry or get a new one)
  • VAT registration document (where applicable)
  • IRT 14 document from SARS. (matching turnover as per latest financials)
  • 3 Months bank statements
  • 3 Quotations (comparable) for every intervention
  • Declaration appointing Graphit as the consultant.
  • Company diagnostic questionnaire and application typed on template supplied by Graphit. Please send back as a Word Document
  • Domicilium form
  • Bank confirmation of your 50% contribution (Will you be able to get finance for your 50% or 20% contribution.) (Clear credit record)

Contact information 

Funding-for-Black-Entrepreneurs-Free-EBook


3. Clothing and Textile Competitiveness Improvement Programme (CTCIP)

textile-manufacturingThis type of government funding is targeted at the clothing and textile industry. They offer a R200 million grant fund launched this year.

The aims of these types of grants are:

  • Stabilise employment
  • Improve overall competitiveness within the clothing, textile, footwear, leather and leather goods manufacturing industries.

To qualify for these types of grants your operational business just need to join a regional cluster recognised by the programme.

Find more information here.


4. Critical Infrastructure Programme (CIP)

infrastructure-buildingThese grants are cost sharing grants for projects designed specifically to improve critical infrastructure. These types of grants offer a cash to a maximum of 30% capped at R30 million of the development cost of qualifying infrastructure. The aims of these government funding and grants are to:

  • Lowering business costs and risks which will support competitiveness
  • Provide targeted financial support for physical infrastructure
  • Stimulate upstream and downstream linkages.

Qualifying for the grant

Public sector entities qualify for this particular grant. These include:

  • Municipalities
  • Private investors
  • Companies

Contact Information


5. Film Incentive Programme

filming-industry

Government funding and grants offer various incentives to promote the film production and post-production industry.

The incentives consist of the:

Foreign Film and Television Production and Post-Production

  • To attract foreign-based film productions to shoot on location in South Africa
  • Conduct post-production activities in South Africa

South African Film and Television Production and Co-Production

  • The assistance of local film producers in the production of local content.

The South African Emerging Black Filmmakers

  • To assist local emerging black filmmakers in order for them to grow enough to take on big productions then they can contribute towards employment creation.

Contact Information:

Find more information here.


6. Business Process Services (BPS)

young-entrepreneurGovernment funding and grants such as this one was created to attract investments and create employment opportunities through offshore activities. Its secondary objective is to create youth employment opportunities and contributing to the export revenue of the country through offshoring services.

Qualify for these business grants by having:

  • Must be performing BPS activities
  • May be involved in starting a new operation or expanding an existing operation in order to perform BPS activities.
  • By the end of three years from the start of the new project or expansion, must have created at least 50 new offshore jobs
  • Must commence its commercial operations no later than six months from the date on which the BPS incentive grants were approved
  • If in a joint venture arrangement, must have at least one of the parties registered in South Africa as a legal entity
  • The project must employ at least 80% youth
  • Have secured a contract for offshore BPS activities
  • Comply with the B-BBEE requirements
  • Submit an application for the BPS incentive prior to the engagement of qualifying jobs
  • The project must be financially viable
  • Comply with all statutory regulations
  • Be a going concern.

Contact Information:


7. Capital Projects Feasibility Programme (CPFP)

exportation-cratesGovernment funding and grants like this one was created as cost-sharing business grants. The objective is that it will contribute to the cost of feasibility studies which will become projects that will boost local exports and stimulate the market for South African capital goods and services.

Business grants that are R8 million cover a maximum of:

  • 50% of the cost of the feasibility study for projects outside Africa
  • 55% of the cost of the feasibility study for projects within Africa.

Requirements:

Must be a South African registered legal entity or partners with a South African registered entity.

Studies which have non-financial criteria:

  • New projects, expansion of existing projects and the rehabilitation of existing projects.
  • The programme that is anticipated to emerge from the feasibility study must fulfil the objectives of the programme.
  • The minimum local content should be 50% for goods and 70% for professional services
  • Projects can be situated anywhere in the world ( excluding South Africa)
  • The project must have a satisfactory chance of being declared a success.

Evaluation criteria which are motivational factors, the project must have:

  • A positive impact on developmental aspects like job creation, skills development, linkages with small, medium and micro enterprises etc.
  • A minimum of 10% of the total professional services involved during the feasibility study should be sub-contracted to South African black-owned professionals/entities
  • A clear detailed time period from which the project stemming from the feasibility study will be realised
  • Funding from private and public sector organisations to realise the project.

Contact Information:


8. Support Programme for Industrial Innovation (SPII)

manufacturing-sector

These are business grants which supports the development of new technology in the South African industry. The government funding and grants focuses on the development of new technology in order to reinforce South Africa’s international competitive edge.

Requirements for SPII Support:

  • Development should represent significant advance in technology
  • Development and subsequent production must take place within South Africa
  • Intellectual Property to reside in a South African registered company
  • Participating businesses must be a South African registered enterprises
  • No simultaneous applications from the same company.

Various schemes offered by SPII:

  • The product process development scheme:
    • Provides financial assistance with non-repayable grants to small, very small, micro-enterprises and individuals.
  • The matching scheme:
    • Provides financial assistance with non-repayable grants to all enterprises and individuals.
  • The partnership scheme
    • Provides financial assistance with conditionally repayable grants to all enterprises and individuals
    • The repayment is a levy based on the percentage of sales over a fixed number of years.
    • The levy percentage and repayment period are established

Contact Information

The DTI customer contact centre

  • National callers: 0861 843 384
  • International callers: +27 (12) 394 9500
  • Find more information here.

National Youth Development Agency (NYDA)

NYDA-logoThese grants programmes are provided to young entrepreneurs as an opportunity to access financial and non-financial business development support. This programme is directed at youth entrepreneurs who are showing potential but are not fully developed yet.

Related: Does the South African government award grants to franchisees?

Young people who would like to access the grants programmes will have to commit to participating in the NYDA mentorship and voucher programme for a minimum of 2 years. The youth business funding ranges from R1000 to R100 000.

Requirements:

  • The applicant must have attained the age of eighteen (18) years at the time of application
  • Require business, start-up or growth funding
  • Are youth (18-35 years) with necessary skills, experience or; with the potential skill appropriate for the enterprise that they conduct or intend to conduct
  • Are South African citizens and are resident within the borders of South Africa
  • Are involved in the day-to-day operation and management of the business
  • Require grants from NYDA of not less than R1, 000.00 and not more than R100, 000.00
  • Require grants from NYDA of not less than R1,000 and not more than R1, 00, 000 within the following thresholds:
    • Threshold 1 – Survivalist business – R1 000 – R10 000
    • Threshold 2 – Start Up – R10 001 – R50 000
    • Threshold 3 – Growth – R50 001 – R100 000.
  • Operate either informally or formally; generally recognised as micro enterprises (e.g. street traders, vendors, emerging enterprises)
  • Have a profit motive and are commercially viable and sustainable
  • Members of entities should comprise 100% South African youth citizen
  • Business are operating within the borders of South Africa
  • Individual entity must have bank account and or a young person must be assisted to open an account
  • For cooperatives they must have or be willing to form a group of minimum 5 persons.

Be aware: If you receive approval of your grants and you are a full time employee, you might be required to resign and provide your grant officer with your proof of resignation

Find more information here.


National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

National-Empowerment-FundGovernment funding and grants like the National Empowerment Fund are targeted at black economic empowerment transactions. Through the provision of financial and non-financial support as well as creating a culture of saving and investing. The NEF is divided into four different types of government funding:

1. iMbewu fund

  • Designed to as start-up business funding for black entrepreneurs as well as supporting existing black-owned enterprises with expansion capital.
  • The fund offers:
    1. Debt finance
    2. Quasi-equity finance
    3. Equity finance.
  • These have a range of funding between R250 000 and R10 million.

2. Rural and community development fund

  • Designed to promote sustainable changes in the rural economy. Specifically in social and economic relations as well as supporting the goals of growth and development through financing of sustainable enterprises. This fund has three products:
    1. Acquisition finance
    2. New venture capital
    3. Expansion capital
  • These have a range of funding between R1 million and R50 million

3. uMnotho fund

  • Designed to improve access to BEE capital and offers five products:
    1. Acquisition finance
    2. Project finance
    3. Expansion finance
    4. Capital markets fund
    5. Liquidity and warehousing
  • These products give capital to black-owned and managed enterprises and black entrepreneurs who:
    1. Buy equity shares in established black and white owned enterprises
    2. Starting new ventures
    3. Expanding existing businesses
    4. BEE businesses that are or want to be listed on the JSE.

4. Strategic Projects fund

This is the centre of the NEF’s investment strategy when it comes to acquiring the involvement of black people in early stage projects. Its main function is to provide venture capital finance aimed at developing new and deliberate industrial capacity within planned sectors acknowledged as key drivers of economic growth.

Contact Information

  • Call: 0861 843 633
  • Find more information here.

The application process for government funding and grants takes time and the paper work can be tiresome. But here has never been more substantial government funding available than right now. The government funding has more than doubled from R242.6 million in government grants in 2011/2012 to R646.5 million in 2012/2013.

An additional R437 million was given out in grants to over 31 000 small and micro enterprises by the National Empowerment Fund, the National Youth Development Agency and others. A lot of success can be accomplished with the help of government funding and grants.

Related: Attention Black Entrepreneurs: Start-Up Funding From Government Grants & Funds

Nicole Crampton is an online writer for Entrepreneur Magazine. She has studied a BA Journalism at Monash South Africa. Nicole has also completed several courses in writing and online marketing.

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Kamogelo Ivan Modise

    Jan 5, 2016 at 16:57

    I have a registered company, working towards property development. I need government grants as this is a start-up and it needs adequate capital to get it into operation. I need assistance with this.

  2. dionmtheza

    Jul 20, 2016 at 19:33

    Plz hlp..in a plan to sell petrol and diesel around praktiseer

  3. dionmtheza

    Jul 20, 2016 at 19:33

    Plz hlp..in a plan to sell petrol and diesel around praktiseer

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Government Funding

What You Need To Know About DTI Funding

This article will differentiate between DTI funding for start-ups and for existing and established businesses.

Nadia Rawjee

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There are certain misconceptions around funding available from the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), as well as the other non-traditional or developmental finance institutions (DFIs).

Related: DTI Funding

Firstly, it’s important to know that funding is available but may take upward of 12 months to obtain.

Success in accessing these funds revolves around which institution and specific fund you approach, how and when you apply and whether your business, and the activities you wish to fund, fits within the funders’ mandates.

Furthermore 99% of grant funds require that:

  • Applicants apply before investing and/or
  • Applicants are rebated their investment and funds are not disbursed before the investment or expenditure and/or
  • Applicants prove they have access to matched funding.

Start-Up Funds (less than 1 year of track record)

Funding for start-ups usually requires the business owner or team to have experience in the field, have a secured market and may require corporate or institutional partners.

Related: Small Business Funding In South Africa

The below funds are applicable to start-up businesses:

Existing & Established Businesses

Typically, existing and established businesses have at least 1 to 2 years of track record (including up to date financials and tax clearance certificates) and the eligibility varies between the funds.

The below funds are applicable to existing and established businesses:

Related: 4 Funding Sources

* Funded by the DTI, but managed by other institutions.

** The BBBEE Codes of Good Practice definition of “black”: A South African citizen that is African, Coloured, Indian or Chinese prior to 1994.

Related: Government Funding and Grants for Small Businesses

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Government Funding

How To Get A South African Government Loan

If you need help funding your small business, try government loans programmes as an alternative to bank funding.

Entrepreneur

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Many small businesses face the challenge of gathering capital to start and/or expand their businesses.

Loans from the government can be a cost-effective means to get the funds you need, but there are important things to consider on the way – such as being prepared for a lot of paperwork, strict selection criteria, and a very long wait.

What is a business government loan?

Most loans for business come through the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and its associated organisations like the Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA).

Related: Government Funding and Grants for Small Businesses

These are loans tend to offer comparably lower interest rates to financial institutions, and have longer or more flexible repayment terms.

Do you have to repay a government loan?

Yes. Businesses that receive a loan from the government are still required to repay the loan in the same way they would if receiving finance from a bank. The difference is that interest rates are much lower and repayment terms longer or more flexible.

list-of-south-african-government-loans

List of government loans for business

  • Isivande Women’s Fund is an exclusive women’s fund established by the DTI to accelerate women’s economic empowerment through affordable, usable and responsible finance. For more information visit their site.
  • Khula is the government’s agency for small business finance. It operates across both public and private sectors and is dedicated to providing much-needed funding to businesses. It serves as indemnity to financial institutes providing loans to businesses without assets to put up as collateral. Visit their site for more information.
  • National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) offers mentorship, development programmes, grants and facilitates funding for youth businesses in South Africa. Visit their site for more information.

Government Funding & Grants

Government grants and loan programmes have been set up by the government to extend funding to previously disadvantaged South African to foster black economic development.


Who can apply for government loans for business?

Each of the loans listed above have their own qualifying criteria.

For Isivande Women’s Fund, applicants need to be:

  • At least six months in operation
  • Have a >50% women’s share and management
  • In need of start-up, expansion or growth capital
  • Have growth potential on a commercial scale
  • Able to improve social impact in the form of job creation and economic empowerment.

For Khula Fund, applicants need to be:

  • Able to provide as much as 10% of the amount they wish to borrow in the form of cash or equipment that can be used in the intended business.

For NYDA, applicants need to be:

  • Between the ages of 18 to 35
  • Have the necessary skills and experience or potential skills and experience to run a business
  • South African citizens
  • Involved in the day to day operations of the business
  • Growing a business that is commercially sustainable, viable
  • Profit motivated.

Related: 4 Funding Sources

application-form-for-government-funds

Tips on applying for government loans for business

Ask yourself the following questions before approaching organisations for funding. Having these answers ready may help you gain a loan:

  1. Why do I need funding for my business? Is your business a ‘leaky bucket’ in the form of too-low pricing, expenses too high, inaccurate book-keeping?
  2. Am I growing too fast? You need to show that you’ve invested in staff and infrastructure to support your further growth.
  3. Is it the right time for me to borrow? Is the industry in a growth phase or in turmoil? Are the interest rates at banks favourable? Is your business stable?
  4. How much money do I need? You need to know exactly how much money is needed and what for. Make sure your business plan reflects these needs.
  5. Can I wait for finance? Whether it’s through a bank or the government, the process is often very slow and frustrating. Be prepared to wait a long time.
  6. Is my credit record clear? This is essential for any kind of loan, no matter where it comes from.
  7. Is my business registered and conforms to all regulations? For an existing business, the entity needs to be registered, have a valid tax clearance certificate and a Vat number.
  8. Can I make repayments? Carefully consider the terms and conditions of the loan to determine whether your business can afford repayments in the specified time-frame, and what the consequences of non-payment will be.

Related: Attention Black Entrepreneurs: Start-Up Funding From Government Grants & Funds

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Government Funding

IDC Funding

Whether you have an existing business or wish to start a new one, if your mandate is job creation and serving previously disadvantaged communities, funding from the IDC could be waiting for you. Read on to see if your business qualifies for IDC funding.

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The Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) has been around since 1940 and is a national development finance institution belonging to the government and is designed to promote economic and industrial development.

The IDC achieves its goals by providing finance for industrial projects and promoting partnerships between and across industries within South Africa as well as across its borders.

Projects financed and facilitated include those that are high-impact and labour intensive, leading the creation and innovation of new industries, using diverse expertise to drive growth in priority sectors, and to take on higher-risk funding projects.

Related: (Directory) Take Your Pick of Funding

The IDC supports B-BBEEE and is actively involved in boosting and promoting black-owned and managed business and those with employment equity, by developing skills of black employees and business owners, by supporting government projects on local, regional, provincial and national levels, encouraging its stakeholders to comply with B-BBEEE policies, and encouraging the private sector to co-finance B-BBEEE transactions.

IDC Funding: Types of IDC funding available

business-funding

Development Funds

These funds are aimed at supporting projects that will have high long-term impact on the economy through growth. Its aimed at bringing projects out of the informal sector and into the economic mainstream.

How to apply

Please find more information on these funds and links to the online application process here.

Agro-Processing Competitiveness Fund

This fund provides support and facilitates increased competitiveness, business growth, job creation and development in the agro-processing and beverages industries.

How to apply

For further information and a link for the online application process please visit here.

Gro-E Scheme

Through this scheme, over the next five years the IDC is investing R10 billion that will offer financial support to start-up businesses that includes funding for buildings, equipment, and working capital.

Related: Government Funding and Grants for Small Businesses

At the heart of this scheme is job creation through business that are: Green industries, agricultural value chain, manufacturing, clothing and textiles, footwear and leather, forestry, paper, pulp, furniture, chemical, pharmaceutical, plastics, mining value china, tourism and services, media and entertainment, and knowledge economy.

The Gro-E Scheme is aimed at start-up businesses and works by funding businesses with a minimum of R1 million to a maximum of R1 billion per project with interest of prime less 3% for loans and the Real After Tax Internal Rate of Return (RATIRR) of 5% for equity financing.

Funding is available over five years or until the scheme is exhausted.

How to apply

For more information on the Gro-E Scheme and to apply for funding continue to the website.

Product Process Development Scheme (PPD)

This is aimed at providing financial assistance to micro and small enterprises where total assets are below R5 million, annual turnover is less than R13 million, and the entity employs less than 50 people.

Related: Funding And Financial Assistance For SA Women Entrepreneurs

The fund is intended to promote innovation and technology development through financial assistance enabling the development of new products and/or processes.

How to apply

For more information on the PPD Scheme continue to the website here, to apply for funding please visit their website http://www.idc.co.za/, click on “Online Funding” and follow the prompts.

Risk Capital Facility Programme

Here, this fund provides risk finance to companies owned by previously disadvantaged individuals that show substantial job creation potential.

Funding can be provided through three channels: Direct channel operating alongside IDC’s mainstream business; through a niche fund channel; and third party channel.

How to apply

For more information on the Risk Capital Facility Programme continue to the website here, to apply for funding please visit their website http://www.idc.co.za/, click on “Online Funding” and follow the prompts.

Funding-for-Black-Entrepreneurs-Free-EBook

Transformation and Entrepreneurship Scheme

This has been set up by the IDC to finance marginalised groups of South Africans such as women and the disabled.

This fund helps individuals gain access to finance that will develop and grow their businesses either as a start-up, or through expansion and/or acquisition.

This fund also provides mentorship and non-financial support such as business planning, training and mentorship.

How to apply

For more information on the Transformation and Entrepreneurship Scheme continue to the website here, to apply for funding please visit their website http://www.idc.co.za/, click on “Online Funding” and follow the prompts.

Related: NEF Funding

Green Energy Efficiency Fund

This fund is aimed at improving energy efficiency and helping South Africa transition to a low-carbon economy. It is intended to drive down energy related costs, improve production capacity, operational effectiveness and competitiveness – thus aiding in job creation.

How to apply

For more information on the Green Energy Efficiency Fund continue to the website here, to apply for funding please visit their website http://www.idc.co.za/, click on “Online Funding” and follow the prompts.

Women Entrepreneurial Fund

As the name suggests, this fund is aimed at improving entrepreneurial participation by women.

Funds will only be given to businesses with a minimum 50% shareholding by women and where women are involved in operations and management, and where funds are needed for start-up or expansion.

Funds are provided for businesses with a total asset base of less than R80 million and a maximum provision of finance is R30 million per transaction.

How to apply

To apply for funding please visit their website http://www.idc.co.za/, click on “Online Funding” and follow the prompts.

Distressed Fund

This fund is designed to assist small and medium businesses negatively affected by the global recession.

The main objective of this fund is to keep businesses open, stem job losses and maintain a productive economy.

The fund helps by building capacity in existing business – thereby creating jobs – as well as providing for working capital, operational and capital expenses, and assisting in competitiveness.

How to apply

For more information on the Distressed Fund continue to the website here, to apply for funding please visit their website http://www.idc.co.za/, click on “Online Funding” and follow the prompts.

The Manufacturing Competitiveness Enhancement Programme (MCEP)

This is a new suite of incentives aimed at existing manufacturers that is designed to promote competitiveness in the industry as well as ensure job retention. It consists of industrial financing loan facilities and production incentive grants.

How to apply

For more information on the The Manufacturing Competitiveness Enhancement Programme (MCEP) and to apply for funding continue to the website.

How to access IDC Funding

The IDC assesses applications for funding based on (but not exclusively) job creation potential, rural development, urban renewal and poverty alleviation, the employment of women and youth, as well as skills development.

Related: New Ways SMEs Can Find Funding

All projects funded must show economic viability and sustainability and should target  previously disadvantaged groups, women, people with disabilities, low income working groups, and marginalised communities.

Contact details for IDC funding

For more information on any of the funds visit www.idc.co.za. You can also phone the IDC call centre on 0860 69 38 88 or email callcentre@idc.co.za.

Related: Attention Black Entrepreneurs: Start-Up Funding From Government Grants & Funds

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