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Funding And Resources For Young SA Entrepreneurs

Young entrepreneurs, arguably, find it more difficult when it comes to starting and growing a business when compared to their more seasoned counterparts. However, by partnering with the right development enterprise or seeking advice from a funding specialist, you may be able to achieve your goals sooner than trends dictate.

Nicole Crampton

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Young-entrepreneurship

Calling all young Entrepreneurs

young-sa-entrepreneurs

For young entrepreneurs – this guide is exactly what you need.

According to a recent report by the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM), South Africa scores poorly when benchmarked against youth entrepreneurship in fellow BRICs countries. The report states that only 7% of South Africans between the ages of 18-24 and 10% between the ages of 25-34 start their own businesses.

One of the leading causes of the culling of entrepreneurial spirit amongst the youth remains access to finance; however there are a number of entities that are willing and able to finance youth ventures.

Here are a few establishments, which could assist you in strutting down the path to business success.

Content in this guide

  1. National Youth Development Agency (NYDA)
  2. Gro-E Youth Scheme
  3. The Youth Entrepreneurship Fund (YEF)
  4. Umsobomvu Youth Fund
  5. Free Mentorship Programme: The Mara Foundation
  6. Mentorship Programme by Application: Bizco Business Consulting
  7. Acceleration Programme: New Ventures Studio
  8. Free online courses for young entrepreneurs

Grants and Funding

National Youth Development Agency (NYDA)

National-Youth-Development-Agency-logo

NYDA

This government grant aims to supply funding to the youth of South Africa, and is currently broadening its offering by creating mentorship and development programmes.

Types of NYDA Funding

NYDA awards grants to both formal and informal businesses that are in the start-up or development phases. These government grants are also awarded to co-operatives; an autonomous association of people united to meet common economic and social goals through a jointly owned and democratically controlled enterprise. Additionally, the NYDA awards grants to youth that are actively involved in community development and facilitation projects.

Do You Qualify for NYDA funding?

  • You need to be eighteen years old at the time of application.
  • The grant needs to be for business start-up or growth.
  • You need to be between the ages of 18-35 years with the necessary skills and experience, or display the potential skill appropriate for the enterprise.
  • Only South African citizens residing within the borders of South Africa are eligible.
  • You will need to be part of the day-to-day operation and the management of your business.
  • Require a grant from NYDA of not less than R1 000 and not more than R100 000.

Once you’ve received the grant, if you’re still employed full-time, you might need to resign and present your grant officer with proof of resignation. This is a requirement of the grant because the NYDA requires you to focus completely on your venture and not split your focus with other obligations, such as a full time job.

How to Apply for NYDA Funding

Entrepreneurs or co-operatives that meet the following criteria are eligible for NYDA government grants:

  • Applicants must be between 18 to 35 years old. They must also have the necessary skills and experience or show the potential skills for the business and industry in which they wish to operate.
  • Applicants must be South African citizens with ID documents and operate their business within South Africa.
  • The applicant must need the grant to start or grow their business. The applicant must not need the grant as any other source of capital.
  • Applicants must involve themselves in the operation and management of the business on a day to day basis and must work on their venture full-time.
  • The business may be formal or informal, and categorised as a micro-enterprise.
  • The company must show potential to be commercially viable and sustainable.
  • Applicants should be sole traders or in the case of groups have a minimum of five people.

Contact Details for NYDA Funding

Read more about NYDA funding.

Gro-E Youth Scheme

Gro-E Youth Scheme

Gro-E Youth Scheme is run through the IDC

The Gro-E Youth Scheme offers both financial and non-financial support to youth initiatives. The aim of this scheme is to help young entrepreneurs contribute towards sustainable job creation. R1 billion has been set aside to assist with funding of businesses owned by individuals, under 35 years old.

This scheme provides loans at prime less 3% to enterprises that operate in the industries that fall within its mandate and aims to create new jobs for South Africans. Only South African citizens or permanent residents are eligible for funding.

Do You Qualify for Gro-E Youth Scheme funding?

  • A least 50% of the ownership needs to be by an individual under the age of 35.
  • Your business needs to be a start-up and the funding can go towards purchasing a building, machinery or working capital.
  • Your intention could also be to expand your existing business.
  • A business that demonstrates economic merit and has prospects of suitable profitability to be able to facilitate their funding obligation.
  • While the business is within the funding period, the cost per job cannot exceed R500 000 relative to the total funding required.
  • Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment certification from an accredited verification agency, where applicable.
  • Ventures that are operating or expanding within South Africa.
  • Your funding period will need structure in order to meet the cash flow needs of your business.
  • Appropriate capital and interest payment holidays are a requirement that you must apply depending on the financial needs of your specific business.
  • There is no prescribed minimum for owner contribution.

In order to support the government’s New Growth Path (NGP) and Industrial Policy Action Plan (IPAP), businesses in the following sectors can apply for funding:

1. Green industry

  • Renewable energy
  • Energy efficiency
  • Pollution mitigation
  • Waste management and recycling.

2. Agricultural value chain

  • Agro-processing.

3. Manufacturing activities

  • Advanced manufacturing
  • Automotive, components, medium and heavy commercial vehicles manufacturing
  • Clothing, textiles and footwear, and leather
  • Forestry, paper and pulp, and furniture
  • Fabrication, capital and transport equipment
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Plastics and chemicals.

4. Strategic high-impact projects

  • Logistics
  • Industrial infrastructure
  • High-impact cross-sector projects.

5. Mining value chain

  • Downstream mineral beneficiation
  • Mining
  • Mining technologies.

6. Tourism and high-level services

  • Business process services
  • Tourism.

7. Media and motion pictures

  • Motion pictures production
  • Media value chain – broadcasting (radio and television)
  • Media expansion – including new media
  • Film production and animation.

8. Knowledge economy

  • Healthcare
  • ICT
  • Biotechnology.

How Does Gro-E Youth Scheme Work?

  • Funding is at prime less 3%, to businesses that will create jobs.
  • A maximum of R50 million per project is available.
  • The funding will be available over a five-year period or until the scheme depletes, whichever occurs first.
  • You will need to use your funds within one year from the approval of funding. If you miss this deadline, pricing reverts back to normal IDC pricing.
  • Reduced loan pricing will be available for five years, after which normal IDC pricing will apply.
  •  If you require finances in excess of the scheme’s limit you can access more capital through traditional IDC funding.
  • Pre- and post-investment support and mentorship is available where needed.

Gro-E Youth Scheme offers programmes that provide non-financial support for entrepreneurs. This backing is available during pre- and post-approval stages. The support also includes services such as assistance to distressed clients.

Contact Details for Gro-E Youth Scheme Funding

Call Centre on 086 069 3888 or email callcentre@idc.co.za.

Free-Ebook-download-for-funding

The Youth Entrepreneurship Fund (YEF)

Youth Entrepreneurship Fund

Youth Entrepreneurship Fund

The Youth Entrepreneurship Fund aims to promote businesses led by youth. The fund aims to achieve this by providing grant funding and business development programmes. Youth pay in a commitment fee for the assistance package that suits their needs.

Do You Qualify for Youth Entrepreneurship Funding?

This fund is open to all South Africans irrespective of race or gender, who are still in or outside of the schooling system. Candidates need to be within the ages of 18-35. There is encouragement of black youth to actively partake in this opportunity to create businesses. The fund also encourages parents, guardians and corporates to invest on behalf of the youth to create wealth.

How to Apply for Youth Entrepreneurship Funding

Starting a business is not a single moment but a process and there are no shortcuts. As a result of this, YEF places a priority on training, mentorship and business coaching.

This is the process leading up to its grant disbursement:

First you chose the package that you need and complete the necessary documentation online.

Second, the business validation process starts. Included in the validation processes are the assessment of your business, guidance and the refinement of your business plan. There is an emphasis placed on business validation, which means your business will need to be innovative and commercially viable. Existing businesses should display the potential of being scalable.

Third, once they’ve evaluated your business for market readiness, the dispersal of the grant will begin. You can only use the grant for the business and nothing else.

Fourth, to ensure the success of your business, mentors will guide you in the process of building your business. Numerous platforms can ensure that your business receives as much support as it needs, both physically and virtually.

What are the Required Contributions and Benefits?

The YEF have created two types of support for youth-led business. This includes financial and non-financial support. The financial support comes in three packages depending on what your business requires. Each package has a corresponding fee structure, as follows:

  • Silver: R166 over a 12-month period = R2 000
  • Gold: R333 over a 12-month period = R4 000
  • Platinum: R500 over a 12-month period = R6 000 

Non-financial support:

Its non-financial support is equally as important, therefore the YEF pays particular attention to this element of business. A reputable academic institute will offer you non-financial intervention, and a network of mentors. These mentors all boast core competencies in the realm of business development.

Contact Details for the Youth Entrepreneurship Fund

  • Office Address: 1st Floor, Block C4, 150 Rivonia Road, Morningside, Sandton
  • Email address: info@yef.co.za 
  • Office Number: (010) 001 6170
  • Call Centre Number: (010) 001 6171
  • Website: yef.co.za

Related: Attention Black Entrepreneurs: Start-Up Funding From Government Grants & Funds

Umsobomvu Youth Fund (UYF)

Umsobomvu Youth Fund

Umsobomvu Youth Fund

Umsobomvu Youth Fund is a government initiative that creates opportunities for South African youth in entrepreneurship and the creation of new jobs. This voucher programme is not a loan programme. The voucher programme provides support services to both new and existing youth-run businesses.

Do You Qualify for Umsobomvu Youth Funding?

You will need to adhere to the following requirements:

  • Males between 18-35 years of age
  • Females 18-65 years of age
  • Unemployed graduates
  • Rural and urban youth
  • Youth in conflict with the law
  • Previously disadvantaged individuals (PDI’s) – 90%
  • Only South African citizens are eligible
  • Non previous disadvantaged individuals – 10%.

Your business should also be within the following sectors:

  • Tourism
  • Information Communication Technology (ICT)
  • Manufacturing
  • Construction
  • Agro-processing
  • Service
  • Franchise.

How Does the Umsobomvu Youth Fund Work?

The voucher programme provides support in the following areas:

  • Accounting
  • Bookkeeping – once off clean-up
  • Business plan development
  • Business and financial administration
  • Feasibility
  • Due diligence
  • Legal services
  • Marketing planning
  • Tender application support
  • Web-based marketing
  • Branding and design of business forms
  • CC and PTY registrations.

Contact Details for the Umsobomvu Youth Fund

Every Wednesday morning at 10:15am, a UYF Information Session transpires and after this session you will receive an application form that will allow you to apply for support services.

For general queries you can also visit its headquarters at The Business Place, 7 Anton Anreith Arcade, 1st Floor, Cape Town on weekdays between 09:00 to 16:30 or call +27 (0) 21 425 7816/7/8/9.

Resource: How to Write a Funding Proposal

Free mentorship programmes

The youth of South Africa are on the back foot with regards to access to education. According to the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation report, young people tend to lack the skills or experience to navigate the business world.

How can unskilled and inexperienced youth create a successful long-lasting business venture? The UYF’s solution to this problem includes: Mentorship programmes, online courses and accelerator programmes.

Free Mentorship Programme: The Mara Foundation

The Mara Foundation

The Mara Foundation

The Mara foundation is offering a free online mentoring platform, called Mara Mentors. This mentoring programme allows ambitious entrepreneurs and global business leaders to connect, while business experts can engage with entrepreneurs via the Mara Mentors web-based platform and mobile application.

Mara Mentor enables ambitious and aspiring entrepreneurs to connect with international peers and business leaders. This platform aims to empower entrepreneurs through the provision of resources that comprise of:

  • Discussions and debate forums
  • Industry news and updates
  • The knowledge of world class mentors.

Entrepreneurs gain encouragement, support, guidance and vital feedback that will help you to evolve your business idea and plan.

Contact Details for The Mara Foundation:

Related: Funding And Financial Assistance For SA Women Entrepreneurs

Mentorship Programme by Application: Bizco Business Consulting

Bizco Business Consulting

Bizco Business Consulting

Bizco Business Consulting (BBC) offers a consulting programme that is unique and allows it to work exclusively with a limited number of start-up companies on a one-on-one basis. BBC expects a commitment from entrepreneurs of at least three months, as it is extremely selective and the programme is highly intensive.

Do You Qualify for Bizco Business Consulting’s Mentorship Programme?

  1. You must be a South African Citizen over the age of 18.
  2. Only applications from individuals.
  3. There is no fee to submit an application.
  4. Only online, electronic, applications accepted.

Contact Details for the Bizco Business Consulting:

Related: Have a Mentor in Your Back Pocket

Acceleration Programme: New Ventures Studio

New Ventures Studio

New Ventures Studio

Accelerator programmes aim to jumpstart businesses. You will increase your chances of raising venture capital from a third-party after graduating from the programme. Mentorship, is another advantage of an accelerator, as you’ll be in contact with other entrepreneurs working within the accelerator.

New Ventures Studio is a platform for young (16-35) individuals, aimed at those who are working towards being successful entrepreneurs. It specifically focuses on those who have realised the importance of upskilling themselves before trying to navigate unfamiliar territory in entrepreneurship.

The programme is an eight-week long insightful course and the five individuals who successfully complete it join the incubator.

You do not need to have a business in order to apply for this opportunity and each of the 20 successful applicants will receive a R35 000 scholarship to attend the eight-week entrepreneurship course.

By taking advantage of the various funds and incubator programmes on offer, young entrepreneurs are able to realise their goals faster, and more efficiently. However, acquiring funding and being part of a mentorship programme isn’t enough to excel in your sector. The programmes highlighted here serve to motivate and drive entrepreneurs to explore new skillsets, push proverbial boundaries and empower people around them by offering employment opportunities and the prospect of a better life.

Contact Details for New Ventures Studio:

Related: 3 Things To Consider Before Meeting A Mentor

Free online courses for young entrepreneurs

Education doesn’t always have to cost you a fortune; you can now undertake courses from leading academic institutions in the comfort of your own home, for free. From these online courses you can learn about business and starting up.

The courses offer self-paced modules, which means you can do it when your diary accommodates; either four, six, eight, 12 or 20 week periods.

Related: 15 Free Online Courses That Are Actually Worth Your Time

Here are four online course platforms that you and any other entrepreneurs can benefit from:

1. Udacity

Udacity-logo

This platform can teach you key tools and steps to building a successful start-up. It has a comprehensive course on acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to see your business grow towards its next milestone.

This platform has an emphasis on tech-based courses including:

Visit www.udacity.com for other course options.

2. Coursera

Coursera-logoWith this platform you get the added benefit of learning all the content you can for free. This site offers a variety of courses that you will need to establish and grow your business, such as:

Visit www.coursera.org for other course options.

3. edX

edx-logoedX offers free online courses from the world’s best universities including Harvard, MIT, UC Berkeley, Microsoft and The Smithsonian. Some examples of what this platform has to offer are:

Visit www.edx.org for other course options.

4. lynda.com

lynda.com-logoExplore a wide range of business skills from project management and negotiation to leadership skills and online marketing strategy. lynda.com’s Professional development tutorials can help you learn SEO, spreadsheets, word processing, including:

Visit www.lynda.com for other course options.

Nicole Crampton is an online writer for Entrepreneur Magazine. She has studied a BA Journalism at Monash South Africa. Nicole has also completed several courses in writing and online marketing.

How to Guides

How Investors Choose Who To Invest In

Why entrepreneurs tend to focus on the wrong things when pitching to investors, and what investors are really evaluating instead.

Allon Raiz

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The hypothesis of my book Lose the Business Plan was that great businesses are not determined by Excel spreadsheets and the all too predictable J-curve, but rather by the entrepreneur or entrepreneurial team and their ability to see opportunity, navigate obstacles and make things happen.

The truth is that entrepreneurs focus on the wrong side of the coin when meeting with an investor. They focus on the deep detail of the business plan and concentrate on justifying assumptions, predicting and overcoming objections, and emphasising market potential. Yet it’s my experience that the real decision on whether or not to invest in a company is more heavily weighted towards the entrepreneur or team rather than the business plan itself.

Once the ‘numbers’ stack (in other words, the business model makes sense) and the risks have been considered and appropriately mitigated, then the real decision-making can begin. The final decision comes down to four important characteristics of the entrepreneur himself or herself.

1. Is she honest?

You may have the best business plan in the world and you may have mitigated every possible risk but, if you are not someone the investor can trust, no deal will be made. I find that entrepreneurs often underestimate the importance of their reputations and, in today’s connected world, it’s so quick and easy to reference someone’s character.

Related: A Comprehensive List Of Angel Investors That Fund South African Start-Ups

Entrepreneurs who think about the short game and make morally questionable decisions for the prospect of quick profits generally find themselves in an ever-diminishing circle of people who will do deals with them. Your reputation is everything and you should guard it at all costs.

2. Does she work hard?

I am still not resolved around the cliché that you should work smart and not hard. (Perhaps I missed the memo or was asleep during the lecture that demonstrated how this is possible.)

In a world that is changing at an astonishing rate, in an economy that is becoming more and more competitive and in a business environment that is becoming ever more complex, it’s hard work to remain relevant and ahead of the curve for any extended period of time. Every quarter sees a new trajectory that needs to be investigated and navigated. In my opinion, this requires not just smart work but hard work, too.

It’s certainly true that investors like to invest in entrepreneurs who will take their investment seriously, who take their businesses seriously, and who are on top of their games.

3. Is she smart?

Smart does not always mean book smart but it definitely means street smart. It means having the ability to read a room, to see an opportunity, to learn new skills quickly and also being able to apply new learning’s to the business.

Investors look for investees who show agility when adapting to feedback from the market, from their competitors, from their staff and more.

4. Is she ambitious?

Investors do not like investing in ‘mom and pop’ operations. They seek the highest return on investment and that comes from businesses that can scale profitably. Scale is always relative to the investor’s perspective and not your own.

An investor with a couple of hundred thousand rand to invest will have very different expectations of the size of business he or she would like to invest in compared to another investor who has tens of millions of dollars. It’s important for the entrepreneur to authentically resonate with the level of ambition of their prospective investor, and be able to express that ambition through a coherent and cogent vision, as well as a plan to achieve that vision.

Remember, no one starts out as the ideal investee. It’s something that is built up over time and requires constant maintenance and curatorship. It’s essential to continually work on your reputation, to ensure that you are up to date with your industry, and to reassess your level of competence in your market. This is the only way to make sure you become and remain an ideal investee to a potential investor.

Read next: The Investor Sourcing Guide

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Company Posts

Are You Struggling To Find Financing For Your SME? Try Alternative Finance

If you don’t qualify for traditional funding or if it isn’t the right fit for your SME why not explore alternative funding? We specialise in alternative financing options by providing in-depth and custom plans for you and your business needs.

Spartan SME Finance

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Alternative Finance is finance beyond the traditional – it is defined by the financiers’ area of specialisation – by what they specialise in, whom they serve, and how they provide their funding. It does not replace traditional finance but rather functions as a complementary and additional form of funding.

Alternative financiers are specialists – they focus on a particular need and on a specific audience. As a result their ‘how’ is customised to deal with their chosen target market and for this targets unique needs. This applies to the funder’s processes and to their level of flexibility around things such as collateral.

An example of this is that a SME may have an existing R1 million overdraft (their traditional finance) secured by R 1.5 million collateral but suddenly they need R5 million for some kind of contract or bridging finance – they need it fast and don’t have that extent of collateral.

The traditional funder cannot provide what they need, their process is too long and their flexibility is too low. An alternative financier providing bridging finance and specialising in SMEs is ideally positioned to fill this gap.

One of the most significant differences between a traditional funder and an alternative financier is in their process. In the case of the alternative financier, they have often chosen to deal exclusively with a particular customer base, for example SMEs. As a result, this funder has both an affinity and contextually relevant empathy in working with SMEs.

Not only do they speak the same language the funder also has an appreciation for the time and material constraints of the SME and has developed their processes to cater to this market. This applies most notably to the turnaround time of the funding need and to the assessment aspect – where flexibility around things such as collateral is vital in making the finance happen for the SME.

A traditional funder is unable to meet the deadline of a bridging finance need, submitted on an urgent basis, where the finance is needed as soon as 2-3 days from time of application. A specialised or alternative funder is able to do exactly this. A traditional funder is also unable to find creative methods in solving the SMEs lack of high-value collateral in applying for finance.

This SME has generally already used their high-value collateral for traditional credit facilities but now needs funding for growth or resolution of a temporary cash flow challenge. An alternative financier is able to look at such an application in a different way, and has most likely already established alternative ways to make this happen for the SME.

Related: 5 Key Questions To Answer For Raising Funding

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How to Guides

Ways To Raise Capital To Expand Your SME

John Whall shares some of his insights about raising capital, despite tough economic conditions.

John Whall

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Times are tough, we all know that. As revealed earlier this month by StatsSA, South Africa is in a recession. But as history tells us, recessions don’t last forever and as a business owner you need to stay focused and continue to look for ways to grow your business, because business growth means economic growth.

John Whall, CEO of Heartwood Properties has been in the business of commercial and industrial property development for many years. He has experienced more than one recession in his professional career. In order to expand, companies can raise capital in two main ways, through debt or equity. Debt involves borrowing money, while equity means to raise money by selling shares in the company.

Whall shares some of his insights about raising capital, despite tough economic conditions.

Debt Financing

Bank funded expansions are a very common option for many SMEs. The one thing you must consider is that it could limit you in terms of how much you can borrow based on your credit history and available assets. You will also be liable for repaying the full loan plus interest. Right now, interest rates remain the same, but it may increase in 2019. Debt if used correctly and not to aggressively is a great way for SMEs to grow and expand, however debt should always be used conservatively and the business owner must ensure that the cash generated by the business can easily repay both the interest and the capital to the bank.

Related: Seed Capital Funding For South African Start-Up Businesses

Government funding

The South African government supports a number of funding programmes to encourage the growth of small, medium and micro businesses in South Africa. You can contact Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), SEFA, NEF,  Khula Finance Enterprise.

Crowdfunding

Used in the startup phase mainly, this form of financing uses your network of friends, family or acquaintances. The Internet is used to spread the word about your campaign to reach larger amounts of people. Equity-based crowdfunding has become a popular alternative for startups who don’t want to be dependent on venture capital investors. This has proven to be very effective in developed markets.

Equity Financing

If you require more capital than you can raise or borrow yourself, and you want to avoid aggressive debt funding then you may want to consider equity funding. This can open up a number of avenues that will offer you capital to grow your business. Very popular amongst startups are angel investors and venture capitalists.

Angel investors are people (business owners) who contribute their time, expertise as well as their own personal finances and in return expect to own a share of your business and receive a share of any future profits.

The opposite are venture capitalists and private equity investors, who are investment companies or fund managers who provide very large sums of cash in return for part-ownership. These type of investors do usually have a say in the management of the business and also agree to a five to seven year exit plan for their investment. This type of funding suits a business who needs a once off equity investment, but does not continuously need to raise capital to grow the business. The election of the investment partner is critical for the business owner and their medium to long-term strategy for the business must be aligned.

Related: 3 Mistakes To Avoid When Running A Crowdfunding Campaign

Going public

Established businesses usually do a public listing to raise ongoing capital in hope of expanding. Not only does this help to strengthen their capital base but it makes acquisitions easier, ownership more liquid for shareholders and allows the business to continuously raise capital to grow. Up until two years ago, the only option for a company to list publicly was through the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE), which required a minimum capital amount of R500 million for a primary listing.

In 2017, the Financial Sector Conduct Authority (FSCA) issued four new exchange licenses in South Africa, all of which are already operational, which is not only providing an alternative to the JSE but is also offering opportunities to smaller businesses and driving down the costs of listing and share trading.  One of these new exchanges is the 4 Africa Exchange (4AX) whom Heartwood Properties is listed with. They are the only exchange apart from the JSE which is licensed to trade across all asset classes, including both equity and debt as well as special-purpose vehicles and real estate investment trusts.

4AX is ideally suited for unlisted companies with a market capitalisation of up to R10 billion wishing to list. This, however, is not to say that this is a ceiling on the size of the company seeking a listing. The exchange has aimed to make the listing process more streamlined and timely while fully complying with its licence and the prevailing legal framework. Its listing requirements are less onerous and more cost effective than listing on the JSE, making it a viable alternative for smaller and medium sized companies. The other exchanges to consider include: ZAR X, A2X, and Equity Express Securities Exchange (ESSE).

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