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How Your Brand Can Drive Your Business Growth

When it comes to growing your business, look inside your business first.

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In today’s price sensitive, highly competitive market, we are seeing more and more knee-jerk reactions from businesses hoping that quick-fix solutions will drive long-term growth and buy the loyalty of a complicated, often disillusioned market.

The problem with this is that the long-term vision is lost and growth spikes quickly but plummets just as fast. When businesses begin to stick in short-term plugs, they lose track of who they are, what they stand for and where they are heading.

It’s a schizophrenic approach to marketing that will almost never see long-term exponential business growth.

We-recommend-tickWe recommend: 50 Steps Every Entrepreneur Must Take to Build a Business

At Shift Joe Public, we believe that when you use brand as a driver, businesses grow. It is simply understanding and utilising that value and the role the brand plays in business.

But what is brand?

It’s a common part of our advertising and marketing language, often bandied about, but few have actually outlined what “brand” really is, and it’s by fully comprehending a brand that you will understand its enormous, fundamental role toward the growth of any business.

Brand is business, but delivered in a human and connected way. It is not the badge displayed outside the building, it is also not the latest campaign or promotion. Yes all of these are critical for attraction and displaying distinction, and are all critical components of brand, but they are derived from the brand.

A brand is an asset, it is the vehicle that delivers the businesses strategic objectives and imperatives.

In order to create a logo or badge or campaign, a business must define its purpose (brand) first.

It must define why it is in business, and not just for the sake of profit because profit will present itself when purpose is aligned to the business strategy.

Connect to survive and thrive

Business-brand-connection-and-communication

This creates connection and connection is human, in fact it is fundamental for our survival. Every person reading this article is a thinking-feeling human, and we as humans, who are ultimately consumers, need something to believe in.

We don’t just buy things, we buy into things – we seek connection that helps us deliver on our greater own purpose.

Price wars and competition is a never-ending battle, but if businesses want to survive, and not only survive but grow sustainably, they need to connect. That is the role of brand, making connections in order to deliver on the business objectives, being profit.

Brand informs your personality, communication, public relations, everything you want people to know, think and feel about you.

We-recommend-tickWe recommend: 6 Human Needs You Must Know For Effective Marketing Campaigns

Brand also informs design, process, culture, research and developments, it attracts the right kind of people, it results in a product, services and offering.

Mahatma Gandhi said, “Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony.”

We believe this is true in business too, brand is considerably important not only to what you promise externally, but what is going on inside, and if the two are aligned, you have authenticity, something every consumer wants. Employer brand is critical for retention and attraction of the right people.

Businesses want and need people who will deliver on the businesses objectives and purpose, by the right kind of positioning you will ultimately want to attract the person who feels that your purpose in some way fulfills their own.

Invest into the core of your brand

All too often businesses are happy to only invest millions on a television campaign in order to drive sales, hoping for long-term returns.

Whereas investment into the core of the brand, looking at the business model, strategic positioning, who you are and what you’re saying, is as critical. This is building business sustainably.

When you create a consistent brand you are creating an asset, creating emotional connection, redefining the category and creating sustainable business growth.

When you have created something people connect with and can buy into, you have created the one thing you’ve been trying to do since you first opened your doors – you have captured a devoted audience. That’s the power of brand.

Intentional, considered strategic and creative decisions are the deliberate steps toward building brands, and by building brands we are building something that is not easily shaken, swayed or unsettled.

Brand is the catalyst that drives lasting, true growth both inside and outside a business. Brand is ultimately what we’re all in this business for.

We-recommend-tickWe recommend: 3 Signs You Need to Pivot

We’ve seen it across a range of categories. Strong brands enhance business performance primarily through their influence on two key stakeholder groups: Customers and employees. So when you as a business are looking for something that will drive your long-term sustainability, take a step back and look at things with a wider perspective in mind.

Yes, communication will drive sales, but it’s brand that will drive long-term and sustainable growth.

Terri-Leigh Blomeyer is the Managing Director at Shift Joe Public. Terri-Leigh has more than 15 years of industry experience, having worked as Client Service Director at Volcano Advertising (Grey) and most recently as Group Consultant Director at Interbrand Sampson. She joined Joe Public United in March 2015 to lead the brand design agency (Shift Joe Public) for the group. “I thrive on creating value for clients, and using brand as the driver of that value. Strategically led design has a significant part to play in the journey toward growth.” Simone Rossum is the Creative Director at Shift Joe Public. Simone started at Joe Public as a junior designer in 2006 and during her climb to Creative Director of Shift, she has been part of several locally and internationally acclaimed design projects. Her work includes the rebrand of Clover SA’s packaging range and the rebrand of Jet, South Africa’s largest value fashion retailer. Her most recent awarded work includes Antalis Start Your Day with Paper coffee cups and the OSAAT Fonts for the Future campaigns, both of which scooped multiple Golds at the 2014 Loerie Awards ranking her as the No. 1 Creative Director on the 2014 Loerie rankings list.

Increase Profitability

Are Your Scalable?

Here’s how you can assess if you’ll make it, or if you need to first make some fundamental adjustments before pursuing your growth goals.

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Pete is a classic entrepreneur. He spent 
15 years building his manufacturing firm to 
a R30 million outfit, before his big opportunity came to take on contracts worth R120 million, allowing him to scale to 
R150 million within five years. This was everything he’d worked towards. This was his retirement plan.

Five years later, instead of running a R150 million business, Pete is burnt out and broke. His company is closed and he’s lost everything. The crisis has even torn his family apart. How did this happen?

A common fate

Unfortunately, it’s a far more common story than most of us would like to admit. 70% of the top 1% of businesses (by growth potential) land up failing to scale. Sometimes, like Pete, they lose everything and close the doors. Other times, they land up bigger, but managing a chaotic hell of their own creation: A daily sprint to survive, a never-ending treadmill of frantic hustling to keep things together, with the horizon never coming closer.

The most common reasons? Either scaling something that fundamentally is not scalable, or scaling poorly; not making the right changes at the right time.

In this article, I’ll be focusing on the first reason: Attempting to scale a business that is fundamentally not scalable — because not every business can be scaled. If your ambitions are focused on high-level growth, step one is to determine if you have the 
right business model to do so. Because if 
you don’t, that’s the first change you need 
to make.

Scalability

Some companies scale easier than others. And some don’t scale at all. Let me illustrate with two extreme examples:

Very scalable: Dropbox makes an extra $10 for every user they add, while adding $1 of cost, and zero operational capacity. That is very scalable.

Not easily scalable: A start-up ad agency is soon faced with a growth ceiling created by the limits of the founder’s time and energy. This normally occurs somewhere between ten and 20 people. An ad agency is not a scalable business model because growth requires top, senior creative talent. Such individuals are rare, have attractive options, and usually prefer to either work for big multinationals, or run their own businesses. It’s therefore tough for smaller agencies to attract and retain talent without offering large chunks of equity, which can be a zero-sum game. It sometimes even works out net-negative. Unless you find a way of breaking that constraint, this is not a scalable business model.

Related: If You Want Scale, Fail Fast And Learn Quickly

So, what makes me scalable?

Building a scalable business is a bit like picking a spouse. There are a number of criteria to consider, the absence of any one of which is a deal killer, even if all other criteria are amply present. A suitor may exceed your fantasies in every regard (looks, smarts, fun, caring, etc), but if they are also prone to parallel relationships, that’s enough to pull the plug and look elsewhere.

Just as in relationships, a number of things must come together to make your business scalable. Here are the ten most fundamental drivers of scalability grouped into three core areas: Scalable market, scalable business and scalable team.

Scalable market

  1. Size (Total Addressable Market, or TAM): The market must be big enough to achieve your ambitions. As a rule of thumb for ambitious entrepreneurs, TAM must be at least 4X your business size goal. If you want 
to build a R500 million business, you need a R2 billion market.
  2. Economics: It’s expensive to scale. You need to invest in great management and top talent, plus spend on infrastructure ahead of actually seeing growth. To make that sensible, it must be very profitable serving your market.
  3. Growth: The market must be growing, and preferably faster than the rate of new competition. 

Scalable business

  1. Number one: Highly scalable businesses almost inevitably are number one, or will become number one in their market or niche. If you can’t lead the market, you must be able to lead a sizable niche.
  2. X-Factor: Every market has a bleak outlook: More competition, lower prices, lower margins. Unless you have some fundamental reason to continue to lead the market despite competitive intensity, such as proprietary tech. It must be good enough that you can be and stay number one in your market.
  3. Scalable channels to market: Some customers are just impossible to reach profitably. A scalable business has access to channels to effectively target, market to and sell to customers profitably.
  4. Scalable operating model: Scalable businesses have unconstrained access to all critical materials and talent, without breaking the economic model.
  5. Scalable economics: You can calculate the scalability of your economics with a simple formula: [Gross Profit per R10 million new revenue] / [new cost required to manage each R10 million new revenue (managers, systems, facilities, etc)]. Highly scalable businesses have a 2X or higher ratio. 1 to 1,2 is borderline and scaling will be like walking on glass. Most businesses have a ratio <1, which means they will lose money by scaling.

Scalable team

  1. Scalable founders: Statistically, most founders are not scalable. They lack the experience, skills and personality profile to make the required shifts as the business scales, and to develop the organisation through its various lifecycle stages. Scalable entrepreneurs are able to:
  • Build a great culture for >100 people
  • Attract and build an A-Team of truly impressive senior leaders, and delegate large parts of the business to them
  • Be ‘builders’ and ‘managers’ — that is, graduate from ‘entrepreneur’
  • Submit their interests to the best interests of the organisation, even when it’s painful — we see this when founders step down in favour of CEOs with corporate experience
  • Lead the transition of the business to a professionally managed company, introducing systems, processes and policies in a way that does not break the company’s culture.
  1. Leadership team: Particularly in the most painful scale up stage — going from ten to 100 staff — the key driver of scaling well is the quality of the top team. That’s why quality of early hires is a great predictor of scalability. Leaders who can adapt and be effective in a business of ten, then 20, then 50, then 100 staff are truly remarkable, and therefore exceptional. Not many manage this transition. These leaders can be effective in three completely different ‘modes of organisation’: The hustle (at ten people); The build (from ten to 100 people); The operate and grow modes. By implication, they are — or can grow into — executives. They can hustle. But they can also shift from a tactical focus (immediate fires and opportunities, action focus), to a strategic focus (future focus and system focus). They are able to run operations while transcending operations, bridging the long-term strategy, the short-term strategy, operations, culture, team, and finances, and they can do that in a company of ten people, or 100 people. Of course, you can bring in new leaders and you can replace leaders that are not scalable, but this dramatically slows the scale-up journey and can even derail it.

The result of having founders and leaders who are capable of scaling with the organisation will be the automatic development of the other key ingredients for a scalable team: Great talent, a highly engaged team, a great culture, and an effective organisation.

Related: What It Will Really Take For South Africa’s Businesses To Scale And Create Jobs

The key to growth

If you’re following the path to scale, or investing in a scale-up, it’s important to be aware of the causality amongst the above ten factors. Typically, the main factor that drives the speed at which a business can scale is how quickly founders can delegate major areas of responsibility, so that the business can continue to make rapid progress at scale.

This in turn is driven by the ‘next level’ (non-founding) leaders, as well as the leadership abilities of the founders. The problem is that early-stage companies struggle to attract top talent, unless they find people who want to be a part of the equity-incentivised leadership team pursuing an exciting opportunity. This type of career opportunity can usually attract top talent, despite the various reasons these individuals gravitate towards well-paid corporate roles and their own ventures.

But that sort of opportunity does not typically happen by accident: It’s the function of the founders getting points 1 to 9 right. In a nutshell, the first thing you need is an amazing team of founders who work smart to nail points 1 to 9, find and pursue an amazing opportunity, and then harness that to attract amazing talent in order to delegate effectively, so that you can scale beyond the limits of the founders’ time and energy.

scalability-self-assessment-tool

Click here to take your free self-assessment. 

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Increase Profitability

Leon Meyer GM At Westin Cape Town Shares 4 Experience-Driven Tips On How To Keep Your Team Productive

Productivity is a fundamental requirement for an organisation – it’s the seed that builds a business and contributes to higher profit margins.

Leon Meyer

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Productivity is a fundamental requirement for an organisation – it’s the seed that builds a business and contributes to higher profit margins. But what’s the best way to ensure employees remain productive, and happy in their day job?

The answer is simple and highly effective and I choose to sum it up with three short phrases – respect, trust and teamwork.

In partnership with my management team, which consists of about eight staffers across various disciplines, we strive to tick these boxes.

Related: 5 Surprising Elements That Boost Your Productivity (One of Them Is Colour)

In total we’re ultimately responsible for managing roughly 500 employees.

Five hundred employees across several departments is a mighty job. But with teamwork, good listening skills and the right attitude from the top to filter down, any business can run like a well-oiled machine.

I’d like share with you the essentials for building and maintaining a productive workforce, and these apply to all industries, not just the hospitality sector:

1. What’s your definition of a productive team and how do you achieve that?

We need to keep in mind that productivity is a result, one that CEOs and managing directors strive for with their teams. But what happens beforehand in order to achieve that result determines whether it will be achieved at all, and is equally important. I suggest the following to ensure a productive team:

Define roles and responsibilitiesDirection is incredibly important; everyone needs to know exactly where they’re going and how they need to get there, so KPIs are essential.

Often when roles and responsibilities are unclear, things go pear-shaped. I am an advocate for setting clear KPIs, it’s a good way to steer us in the right direction, and in turn helps to grow the business and the individual in his/her role.

Be flexible: Rigid environments are the worst kind, allow your employees some flexibility and the opportunity to be themselves in the workplace. We spend so much of our time at work, we need to be ourselves there.

Celebrate the team: When there are achievements, celebrate them, single out individuals who are excelling and living the company values. This builds morale and is indicative of appreciation, which is fundamental when running and building a business.

2. What has and continues to be your philosophy since managing a large team?

Know your strengths and weaknesses, as well as your team’s and leverage off that. Be prepared to learn from others, no one can operate in isolation, regardless of the level on which you operate. Accept criticism and don’t bulldoze someone’s ideas, that’s how you build trust.

3. What in your view are the top characteristics the team look for in a leader?

  • Be consistent – inconsistency screams bad leader
  • Provide guidance – this is key, don’t turn a blind eye, give input and council
  • Listen – always listen intently
  • Be impartial – always be fair
  • Give credit – it builds morale and shows you recognise good work
  • Be patient – Rome wasn’t built in a day, and remember not everyone thinks the same as you do

4. What’s your view on an open door policy and how does it assist with managing a team and ensuring everyone remains productive?

I believe in an open door policy. It’s essential to build and develop trust. I’m the first to admit that it takes a while to build that trust, but once the team (on all levels in all departments) know your door is always open, and that they can trust you implicitly, half the battle has been won.

I host a GM’s roundtable every two months, just to establish how everyone is feeling and where everyone is at. It gives staff the opportunity to bring their challenges to the table, and I deal with them the best I can.

It’s 100 percent confidential and line managers are not allowed to attend. During this meeting we try reach common ground, and I commit to addressing and ultimately solving the problem(s).

Related: 10 Ways To Make Your Employees 10x More Productive

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Why Purpose Drives Profits

If you want to succeed, it’s time to start engaging where it matters.

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Over the past two years, many clients have been extending brand positioning exercises into purpose-driven expressions.

When we look at it, it makes sense given the country’s demographics. With many of our fellow countrymen struggling to make ends meet, brands have stepped in to provide them with a picture of a future worth striving for.

Global customer-centricity study, Insights 2020, led by research firm Kantar Millward Brown, has attempted to understand how brands could drive customer-centric growth as well as the factors that really make a difference. The research surveyed 10 495 individuals in 60 countries, and there are some significant efforts worth investing in if brands want to engage where it matters most, in consumers’ hearts.

The research uncovered that for market-leading companies and brands, traditional value drivers such as quality, packaging, or distribution are necessary, but no longer provide a competitive advantage; most brands are capable of providing these drivers. What is important, are a few critical approaches.

1. Purpose-led brands

The study found that when companies or brands linked to a purpose, 80% of them outperformed the market. Only 32% of non-purpose led brands managed to perform better than the market. 

Related: How To Calculate Gross Profit

2. On the ground

It’s important to engage with consumers in their space and on their terms. Through the use of memorable campaigns, experiential events and activations it is critical to engage with consumers on their turf.

3. Be truthful and authentic

Consumers can smell something inauthentic a mile away, especially when it’s coming from a brand. This forces brands to strive for authenticity in everything they do, especially when it comes to marketing. Building values and principle-based attributes into your brand as a guiding tool is essential.

4. Helping consumers commit

By allowing individuals to attach themselves to a brand with a purpose, it helps consumers personally commit to a cause that they consider important. When a consumer is personally invested, the link between the brand and product or service deepens.

Related: Profit Share for Increased Performance

5. Balancing heritage and modern relevance

There is a continuous tussle in balancing the traditional market, transitional market and the new consumers brands are trying to attract. Keeping the heritage and roots of the brand true to itself, while creating relevance for the new market, is a battle marketers are still fighting.

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