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Jason Goldberg Asks Are You (Realistically) Ready To Scale Your Business?

You’ve built a solid business. The money is coming in. Now you’re ready to scale – to go big. But are you really ready? Are you mentally prepared? Being a start-up founder and a company CEO is not the same thing.

GG van Rooyen

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Jason-Goldberg

Vital Stats

  • Player: Jason Goldberg
  • Company: 10x-e
  • Founded: 2015
  • Background: 10X-e was created by Vumela and Edge Growth. Its aim is to help talented entrepreneurs succeed by offering a high-growth support system.
  • Visit: 10x-e.com

When Eric Schmidt stepped down as CEO of Google in 2011, he posted the following message on Twitter: “Day-to-day adult supervision no longer needed!”

He was referring to the fact that, after a decade as the company’s chief executive, the throne was being handed back to 37-year-old Google founder Larry Page.

Related: Don’t Let People Dissuade You from Following your Dream – Polo Leteka Radebe 

The comment seemed a bit, well, snarky. It wasn’t. But it had some backstory. By the turn of the millennium, Google was attracting investors, but these investors were understandably reticent about sinking millions of dollars into a company that was located above a bicycle shop and headed by two unruly Montessori alums.

The money men were willing to invest, but not without what Silicon Valley VCs referred to as ‘adult supervision’. Founders Page and Sergey Brin grumbled about it, but eventually agreed. They started shopping around until they found the perfect candidate: Steve Jobs.

Jobs wasn’t available. But Eric Schmidt was. And the Google boys liked Schmidt. He wasn’t just a businessman — he had a solid background in engineering and tech. In fact, he had become Sun Microsystem’s first software manager in 1983.

So Schmidt’s tweet wasn’t snarky at all. In fact, it was the opposite. It was a statement filled with genuine affection for the Google founders — a tongue-in-cheek declaration that a decade of ‘adult supervision’ had officially come to a close.

As the geniality of the message implies, the partnership had worked. Schmidt and the founders had worked well together. This isn’t always the case. It can be disastrous, which is why there has been a move away from replacing the founder of a company once it scales to a certain size.

“While replacing a company founder with a CEO is certainly an option when looking to scale a business, it has traditionally had mixed results,” says 10x-e founder and Edge Growth founding director Jason Goldberg.

“Because of this a VC firm like Sequoia Capital in Silicon Valley no longer expects a founder to be replaced when a business scales. When a company loses its leader, it loses a lot of its essence.”

You Need To Cede Some Control

The poster boy for the tech-founder- turned-Fortune-500-CEO is obviously Mark Zuckerberg. Despite still looking like a boy playing dress-up in his dad’s clothes whenever he dons a suit, Zuckerberg has proved to be exceptionally adept at growing Facebook through its various phases.

How has he managed this? While he certainly has more business savvy than initially given credit for, a lot of the company’s success can be attributed to Sheryl Sandberg. Zuckerberg hired Sandberg (then Google’s president for online sales and operations) as COO in 2008, and she transformed Facebook from ‘cool website’ into ‘profitable business’. But she couldn’t have done this without Zuckerberg giving her the freedom to do so.

It’s an important example founders should follow, says Goldberg. “Growing companies need to complement existing leaders with others who have real management experience. Entrepreneurs need to make a paradigm shift when they scale. You need to accept that, even if you stay on as CEO, you are ceding a level of control. It ultimately comes down to the maturity of the founding team. Do they have the maturity to adapt to the new management context? They must realise that they don’t all bring a lot of management know-how. If they can’t make the shift, they kill the business.”

Sandberg was a great hire for one simple reason: She was a seasoned executive with more experience than Zuckerberg himself.

“A lot of growing companies hire the wrong people. If you’re looking to scale aggressively, now is not the right time to hire young people that need mentoring,” says Goldberg. “You want to hire people who can do things five times better than you can. If you’re not comfortable handing off an important task, you’ve hired the wrong person.”

Related: Busy Cardiologist Dr Riaz Motara Works A 4-Day Work Week – Here’s How

Don’t Get Sucked Into The Vortex Of Day-To-Day

Growing a business is chaotic. Once you start scaling aggressively, a million things will demand your attention every single day. You will feel as if you’re drowning.

“We refer to it as ‘the vortex of day-to-day’. As the business grows, there will be more and more balls in the air, and unless you’re able to hand them off, they’re going to drop to the floor,” says Goldberg.

“You have to ask yourself: How do we, for example, have 100 sales meetings every week without the founder having to be in any of them?”

This requires that founders hire competent people, and allow them to run with things. But it also requires something else: According to Goldberg, it comes down to creating systems and processes that diminish the need for executive involvement.

At the same time, you don’t want to turn into that stereotypical organisation that depends too heavily on paper pushing and bureaucracy.

“As you scale, you hire more and more people who don’t actually care that much about the customer. It’s inevitable. At 100 people, you will have employees who never interact with the customer, and who will probably be implementing processes that irk them. A customer who used to deal with a founder will now get an email from a faceless accounts department. So you need to systematise everything from the focus point of delighting the customer. It’s very important to institutionalise customer delight.”

Strike a Careful Balance Or Risk Chaos

Jason-Goldberg-10x-e

Here is the reality of scaling a business aggressively: Your business will lose most of the advantages it had early on. As it gets bigger, it will get slower, regardless of the systems you put in place.

“You have to consider if your company can put its prices up by 20%. If you grow quickly, your costs will go up, but you won’t yet have scale. So unless you get a lot of funding, you’ll need to up prices.”

You will, at least for a while, be slower and more expensive than much of the competition. So what’s needed is a product that is so great that customers will keep coming back, even if you’re no longer the quick and agile start-up you used to be.

“You have to strike a careful balance. Build solid systems and a good management team too soon, and you’ll burn through cash too quickly. Wait too long, and your growing company will descend into chaos,” says Goldberg. “Scaling requires you to spend ahead of revenue — but not too far ahead.”

Related: 7 Up And Coming SA Businesses To Watch

Scaling the un-scalable

Not every business can scale. Can yours? You need to take an honest look at your company.

To paraphrase Leo Tolstoy: All successful businesses are alike. All failed businesses are unsuccessful in their own way.

Google and Facebook grew in different ways, but they were alike in one very important area: They both had businesses that were scalable.

Before jumping into the minutiae of scaling a business, it’s worth taking a moment and asking yourself how scalable your business model truly is. If your business isn’t inherently scalable, no amount of good hires or clever processes will allow it to scale.

“There are three kinds of businesses: Un-scalable, scalable and hyper-scalable,” says Goldberg. “Something like Dropbox or Facebook is hyper-scalable. Here the marginal cost of selling an additional product is virtually zero because delivery is automated.

“A scalable business is one that offers a blueprint for success that can be replicated. A franchise restaurant is a good example. Every restaurant is a profitable unit that can be operated in the same way as the previous one.

“An un-scalable business is one that doesn’t have a ‘saleable unit’ that can easily be rolled out multiple times. Many service businesses find themselves in this kind of situation. If you offer a high-level service that requires very knowledgeable (and expensive) experts, it’s hard to scale. There are many businesses like this with low barriers to entry that struggle to scale beyond 30 people because most of the skilled leaders they need would rather start and run their own businesses. Something like Uber is scalable because being an Uber driver does not require an expert skillset. However, there are exceptions. Advisory firms have managed to scale because regulation creates predictable demand, there is some regular supply of human talent and there are high barriers to entry for new players.”

Remember This

Taking a company from start-up phase to corporate level is a long journey that requires a host of different skills. Very few entrepreneurs have all the talents needed to scale a business successfully.

GG van Rooyen is the deputy editor for Entrepreneur Magazine South Africa. Follow him on Twitter.

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Need To Trim The Fat To Boost Profitability? Listen To Your Clients First

Jeff Bezos believed that once you win the client over by doing this, everything else will follow – not least profitability.

Marc Wachsberger

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customer-service

Finding the balance between offering the extras that set you apart from your competitors and keeping things ‘lean and mean’ to minimise wastage and maximise return on investment is a tricky balancing act.

I’ve noticed that many businesses try to attract or retain customers by offering what they think their customers want, rather than finding out what they really need, and then delivering that. That’s an expensive mistake to make – and it’s not going to achieve the business results you need.

I’ve also observed that now is the age of the new entrepreneur – the game changers who disrupt the status quo long set by big bureaucratic competitors who think that their customers will just accept an inflationary (or slightly larger) increase every year, just because they always have.

While Amazon has been around for a while now, there’s also an important lesson to be learned from its launch goal, which was to bring the price to the client. Jeff Bezos believed that once you win the client over by doing this, everything else will follow – not least profitability.

How have I applied these lessons in my business?

Firstly, we design our hotels backwards – we focus on the needs of our clients, very aware that what hotel guests wanted years ago is not what they want now. That’s why we don’t offer thing like a turn-down service with chocolates on the pillow. Nobody eats the chocolates, and nobody uses the toiletries – so why should we include the costs of these unwanted extras (and the cost of the staff required to implement them) in the final bill to our clients?

Related: 7 Steps To Optimise Your Cycle Of Customer Service

We do, however, offer free WiFi internet connectivity, free parking in our buildings, free laundry services and either bed-and-breakfast options or self-catering rooms.

Simply put, we’ve cut the fat that nobody wants anyway, and added the value that our guests have said they expect.

Our clients have said that they expect the whole hotel to be a workstation, and not just the business centre in a dark, unwanted corner. So, we’ve put a workstation in every room, with always-on access to the internet. Our hotels are designed with beautiful work spaces that cater for nomadic entrepreneurs and double up as comfortable meeting spaces, again – gone are days of boardroom only meetings, our spaces are primed for work and play in one integrated space.

Our clients have pointed out that they’re already paying for their room – so why should they pay for parking?

Many of our clients stay with us for days or weeks at a time, and have said it would be helpful if we did their laundry. So, we do that for them – and we don’t charge them for it.

Related: Good Customer Service Is About Relating At The Same Level

It’s true that many of our old-school competitors offer a broader range of products and services than we do, but we’ve built a successful business on adding the value that our clients need, removing the costs and extras that annoy them, and keeping costs (theirs as well as ours) under control by cutting out unnecessary frills.

It’s an approach that’s worked for The Capital Hotels and Apartments as a disruptor in the hotel and long-stay accommodation industry, and I’m confident that its principles would apply to any other industry that’s ripe for disruption.

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If You Want Scale, Fail Fast And Learn Quickly

Mindset, focus and an understanding of scale are essential if you want to build a highly profitable, growing business.

Matt Brown

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tom-asacker

“The secret to scaling a business is increasing revenues without incurring a corresponding increase in operating costs,” says Tom Asacker, author of The Business of Belief, Opportunity Screams, A Little Less Conversation and A Clear Eye for Branding, all groundbreaking books that redefine business and communication for the new age of abundance. “The single most important challenge is to have a deep understanding of your value creation and customer attraction and retention process, as well as how the company will ultimately make money over time through the unique realisation of that process.”

According to Howard Sackstein, founder of Saicom Voice Services, scale used to be measured by the number of people you employed or the number of branches you opened. “Today, these questions have become irrelevant,” he says.

howard-sackstein“When Whatsapp was sold for $19 billion the business had only 55 employees servicing 450 million users who were sending 34 billion messages a day – that’s a tiny company with enormous scale. So, today scale has come to mean something very different. In the new economy, scale is about scalable technology, how do we build software and apps that can cater for a billion users? The ideas of lots of employees and lots of offices has become old fashioned.”

The problem is that scale comes with costs and that’s why money is often the enemy of entrepreneurship. “Many of the great businesses of the new economy all began in garages, a small group of people, each with real skills each trying to bootstrap an idea to see if it worked,” continues Howard.

Related: Do You Have That 1 In 100 Business That Can Scale And Land An Investor?

“Often people go looking for funding; there’s a problem there too though – they scale too fast once they receive the cash and ultimately they fail because they have too much money. Entrepreneurs need to start small and if they fail they must fail fast. They need to test the market and grow incrementally to prove their idea. Once the idea has achieved a degree of adoption and has ‘crossed the chasm’ of technology adoption, only then can you start thinking of scale. And today scale means few costs, few employees, and tech that can scale to a mass market.”

Your Mindset is Everything

Your mindset while scaling is critical. “Value creation, customer attraction and your retention process are the result of every decision you make as an entrepreneur,” says Tom. “Your mindset shapes how you make these decisions.

“Every rand spent should be to add value in the eyes of the customer, or to improve the process that delivers that value, through automation, distribution, channel partners and so on.

“If businesses aren’t hyper-focused on adding value and deepening relationships with customers, someone will come along who will. If that happens, whether or not that process produces rapid growth is beside the point.”

Howard believes that follow-through is also essential. “So many people really want to build empires,” he says. “But how do you measure your success? Is it the number of employees you have, the number of companies, your disruptive influence on the market, revenue or actual profitability?

“You really need to decide this up front and that will affect your strategy. I probably have an old school mentality, but for me profit is everything. I don’t really understand the idea of focusing on scale with no business model in the hope that on an exit someone will find value. I know that’s a common idea in the tech world and you could get lucky by following it, but I think there are few people with that degree of luck – build for profit and sustainability, build as lean as possible and keep your eye on the actual ball.”

Related: What’s Stopping Your Business From Growing?

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Do You Have That 1 In 100 Business That Can Scale And Land An Investor?

Only 1% of businesses are investable, mainly because that’s how many businesses can 10x their growth. There’s an art to scaling, and it starts with you.

Matt Brown

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vuyo-tofile-ceo-of-entbanc-group

Only one in every 100 applications typically receive funding from venture capitalists. All 100 applicants believe their businesses are scalable and worthy of funding – and yet only 1% actually close investment deals.

“Most entrepreneurs radically overestimate their prospect of success and scalability,” agrees Jason Goldberg, founder, and CEO of 10X-e and co-founder of Edge Growth.

“If you really want to scale your business, you need to know that you are absolutely obsessed with solving a problem that hasn’t been solved before – so obsessed that you wake up at night with solutions buzzing around your head; so obsessed that your mind is always on the problem you’re trying to solve. The reality is that hunger is an incredibly important success factor – hunger, the hours you’re willing to put in and your level of intensity. How far are you willing to go and how many obstacles will you overcome?”

Related: What’s Stopping Your Business From Growing?

With this in mind, Jason and Vuyo Tofile, CEO of Entbanc Group, a fintech and digital support services firm share their top 3 secrets of scale.

1. You need to shift into a ‘scale’ mindset

Jason-Goldberg

Start-up entrepreneurs are focused on the hustle: More work, more energy, more sales. These are all important factors in building a business, but scaling a company requires a different focus. “Scaling up is all about architecting an enterprise and strategically putting in place the building blocks that will move you from working primarily in the business to working on the business,” says Jason.

“You need to minimise the work in the business so that you can work on the business and build a great company.”

This is easier said than done though. Often the biggest stumbling block to a company’s ability to scale is the founder. “The company founder or owner’s inability to really focus on solving an initial problem for specific target market, understanding what their business really does and is offering, and finally how to truly replicate that service or offering can be major barriers to growth, and they all lie with the entrepreneur,” says Vuyo.

The lesson is clear – you can hustle and make sales without clear structures and strategies in place, but that won’t get you to scale.

“A lot of entrepreneurs love the innovative and creative mind space of start-ups as well,” adds Jason, “which is great, but scaling is all about executing all those great ideas that you innovation and creativity helped you to come up with. If you can’t do that, you’ll never be able to scale.”

“Having the ability to execute on growth is critical,” agrees Vuyo. “Execution of the vision is far more important than having a strong vision. Vision without execution is meaningless.”

2. Get the right team in place

According to Vuyo, if you want to scale your organisation, you need the right people on board – and this too is a crucial skill the founder needs to foster. “You have to be able to build an effective team around the business,” he says. “You don’t need to be able to do everything yourself – in fact, in order to scale you mustn’t – but you do need to know who you need and where you need them.”

For Jason, the lead indicator of your ability to scale is whether or not you can build a sales organisation. “Can you shift from selling to becoming the architect of an organisation that sells for you?” he asks.

Alongside this ability is shifting from hiring who you can afford to who you need. “Start-ups hire talented ‘jack of all trade’ young high potentials (who are typically overworked and underpaid). This is an essential start-up tactic. Mature firms in scale-up mode need seasoned leaders who can take each part of your business to the next level.

“Having an awesome team is your most important ingredient of success. Every senior person needs to be pretty impressive in general, spectacular in their roles, and work well as a team.”

3. Understand if your business is scalable

Not all businesses are scalable – and that’s fine. Not all entrepreneurs want to scale their businesses either. However, if you do want to scale, it’s important to know if your business falls into the scalable or un-scalable category.

“There are three basic rules of thumb,” says Jason. “First, how big is the problem you’re solving? Is this a problem that lots of people have and are willing to spend money on the solution?

“Second, what kind of problem is it? Is your solution a vitamin pill or a headache pill? How does your client feel if you don’t exist? You’re not scalable if they don’t have a painful experience without you. In other words, do they have a headache if they haven’t seen or heard from you today?

Related: Is Your Business Ready To Be Funded?

“Finally, how different is the value you bring to your client than all their other alternatives? You need to be ten times more valuable than your competitors. If you’re not, there’s too much competition, and you’re unlikely to 10x the business.”

Vuyo agrees. “Scale is all about having a service or product that is of real, tangible value to your customer. All the resources and brand equity in the world won’t help you scale if you aren’t providing real value.”

Secrets of Scale Event #3

PART 1 – BUILDING THE AEROPLANE

This segment will be the majority of our focus and will cover practical “how to steps” for scaling your business. We’ll be revealing how to design a scale ready business and walk you through common pitfalls that all entrepreneurs will encounter as they “build the aeroplane” and how to avoid them. We’ll also reverse engineer how to design a scale ready business from a 150 strong team all the way down to a 5 person team.

PART 2 – BUILT FOR WINTER

This segment is all about how to ensure that you remain profitable as you scale. We’ll unpack how to bring different revenue streams, partnerships and products/services to together to help you weather any storm.

PART 3 – SCALE BLUEPRINT

In this segment we’ll explore the systems that can help you scale, how to automate repetitive processes and outsource non-essential tasks and how to design a business that makes more money while you sleep than when you’re awake.


Listen to the podcast here:

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