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Develop Magnetism

Every person has a little magnetism inside them. Learn how to leverage it to draw in more business.

Ivan Misner

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DevelopMagnetism

There are two elements involved in becoming a magnet. The first is your ability to attract people. The second is your approachability, the extent to which others perceive you as being open. Together, these two qualities create a positive attitude, one of the top traits of a master networker. Together, they influence how magnetic you are for your business.

In business, magnetism typically means being a centre of influence. What if you could become a living magnet for your business? Who or what would be attracted to you? Being a centre of influence involves positioning yourself to attract other people to you. It means becoming recognised as the go-to person, the one with a broad network, the person who knows people who can solve other people’s problems. That’s the person you want to become because that’s who you need to be to stand out from your competition.

A magnet’s strength is related to the composition of the magnet – not necessarily the size. You’ve probably heard of a person having a magnetic personality. If something or someone is magnetic, the object or person has an extraordinary power or ability to attract. We tend to attract people most like ourselves in our daily encounters. You may have experienced the challenges of trying to get a group of six close friends together. Busy people attract other busy people, making it more challenging to get that group together. But the rewards are great when the schedules align for a nice dinneror evening out.

Becoming Magnetic

Now let’s consider the second element of becoming magnetic: your approachability factor. Author and professional speaker Scott Ginsberg hasd one extensive research on approachability in relationships. You may have heard of him. He’s also known as “the Nametag Guy.” (He wears a name tag everywhere he goes.) As the author of The Power of Approachability, he helps people maximise their approachability and become unforgettable.

Ginsberg says approachability is a two-way street.”It’s both you stepping onto someone else’s front porch, and you inviting someone to step onto your front porch,” he says. Here’s a summary of Ginsberg’s tips on how to maximise your approachability.

1. Be ready to engage

When you arrive at a meeting, event, party or anywhere conversations will take place, prepare yourself. Be ready with conversation topics, questions and stories in the back of your mind as soon as you meet someone. This will help you avoid awkward small talk.

2. Focus on CPI

CPI stands for common point of interest. It’s an essential element in every conversation and interaction. Your duty, as you meet new people, or even as you talk with those you already know, is to discover the CPI as soon as possible. It helps establish a bond between you and others. It increases your approachability and allows them to feel more comfortable talking with you.

3. Give flavoured answers

You’ve heard plenty of fruitless questions in your interactions – questions like “How’s it going?” “What’s up?” or “How are you?” When such questions come up, Scott warns, don’t fall into the conversation ending trap of responding, “Fine.”Instead offer a flavoured answer: “Amazing!” “Any better, and I’d be twins!” or “Everything is beautiful.” The other person will instantly change his or her demeanour, smile and, most of the time, ask what made you answer that way. Why? Because nobody expects it. Not only that, but offering a true response to magnify the way you feel is a perfect way to share yourself or make yourself personally available to others.

4. Don’t cross your arms at events

Even if you’re cold, bored, tired or just don’t want to be there, don’t cross your arms. It makes you seem defensive, nervous, judgemental, close-minded or sceptical. It’s a simple, subconscious, nonverbal cue that says, “Stay away.” People see crossed arms, and they drift away. They don’t want to bother you. You’re not approachable.

Think about it. Would you want to approach someone like that? Probably not. So when you feel that urge to fold your arms across your chest like a shield, stop. Be conscious of its effect. Then relax and do something else with your arms and hands.

5. Give options for communication

Your friends, colleagues, customers and co-workers communicate with you in different ways. Some will choose face-to-face; some will email; others will call; still others will do a little of everything. Accommodate them all. Give people as many ways as you can to contact you. Make it easy and pleasant.

On your business cards, email signatures, websites and marketing materials, let people know they can get in touch with you in whatever manner they choose. Maybe you prefer email, but what matters most is the other person’s comfort and ability to communicate with you effectively. There’snothing more annoying to a phone person than to discover she can’t get hold ofyou unless she emails you.

6. Always have business cards

At one time or another you’ve probably been on either the telling or listening end of a story about a successful, serendipitous business encounter that ended with the phrase, “Thank goodness I had one of my business cards with me that day.” If you recall saying something like that yourself, great. You’re practising approachability by being easy to reach.

If not, you’ve no doubt missed out on valuable relationships and opportunities. And it happens. People forget cards, neglect to get their supply reprinted or change jobs. Always remember: There is a time and a place for networking – any time and any place. You just never know who you might meet.

7. Conquer your fear of rejection

Do you ever hear yourself saying, “They won’t say hello back to me. They won’t be interested in me. I will make a fool of myself”?

Fear is the number one reason why people don’t start conversations – fear of rejection, fear of inadequacy and fear of looking foolish. But practice will make this fear fade. The more you start conversations, the better you become at it. So be the first to introduce yourself, or simply to say hello. When you take an active rather than passive role, you develop your skills and lower your chances of rejection.

8. Wear your name tag

Your name tag is your best friend for several reasons. First of all, a person’s name is the single piece of personal information most often forgotten – and people are less likely to approach you if they don’t know (or have forgotten) your name. Second, it’s free advertising for you and your company. Third, name tags encourage people to be friendly and more approachable.

Ginsberg ‘s axiom about the CPI is particularly powerful in networking for your business. Consider the people you know best right now. Ifyou know them through work, they all share work with you as a CPI. If you know them through your soccer league, they share your interest in soccer. With that in mind, you could be attracting people who later – after you’ve built a relationship starting from this common ground – could help your business.

Called the "Father of Modern Networking" by CNN, Dr Ivan Misner is a New York Times bestselling author. He is the founder and chairman of BNI, the world's largest business networking organisation.

Branding

5 Things You Can Do To ‘Humanise’ Your Brand

Face it: Consumers don’t automatically trust your brand or anyone else’s. Whaddaya gonna do?

Syed Balkhi

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branding

Let’s face it, consumers don’t trust brands. Most people view companies like faceless enemies; they’re just out to make money; they’re just telling us what we want to hear. So, if your company wants to win over more customers, you’ve got to get them to trust you.

In fact, according to PwC’s Global Consumer Insights Survey 2018, more than one in three consumers surveyed ranked “trust in brand” among the top three factors, other than price, influencing their decision to shop at a particular retailer. How do you get consumers to trust your company? You do it by showing them the human side of your brand. That will inspire more trust from consumers and boost your conversions.

To form meaningful relationships with your audience, check out these five ways to humanise your brand.

Show off your funny bone

netflix-tweet

One easy way is to show off your funny bone. According to researchers from the Turku PET Centre, Oxford and Aalto universities, social laughter leads to an endorphin release in the brain and may promote the establishment of social bonds. So, if laughter can make us feel good and encourage connections between people, you should consider using it to get the same results for your business.

Not a comedian yourself? Don’t worry; you can share popular and funny content that already exists. It’s what Netflix does when the media giant shares funny images from its shows.

Showing your more playful side will help consumers see that you’re not just a business focused on selling a product; you’re a human who can put aside your seriousness and have some fun.

Related: Boutique Branding Consultancy Morake Design House

Put your team members in the spotlight

Letting consumers see the people behind the business is a powerful way to humanise your brand. If consumers are looking at just your logo all the time, they might not see your brand as human. So, put your team members in the spotlight.

Shoot some quality photos of your staff members and display them on your website and your social media platforms. You don’t need to hire a professional photographer; iPhones today can take some pretty stunning shots. You might even share your employee of the month and include a story about what makes that staffer so great. Seeing the amazing people “behind the curtain” will help consumers put a face to the brand name.

Share user-generated content

Sharing user-generated content works to humanise your brand in two ways: First, it’s exciting and flattering to the user who gets his or her photo featured on your website or social media feed. Second, it shows other consumers that you have great relationships with their peers and that those people already enjoy your products.

Instead of being asked to blindly trust a company’s claims, consumers will see real-life people falling in love with your products, which will promote trust in your brand. Example? Airbnb does user-generated content well by sharing with its followers the amazing experiences its customers are having around the world.

airbnb-mozambique-holiday

If you don’t have any user-generated content, ask your customers for it. Do this in an email marketing campaign; add it to your branded packages for shipping; or create a post on social media encouraging users to take a photo of/with your product and share it in combination with a unique, branded hashtag.

Related: 5 Ways To Make Your Personal Branding Statement Stand Out

Tell authentic stories

Don’t spend all your time online just talking about how great your company is; humanise your brand by telling authentic stories. Sharing real stories about your failures, hardships and lessons that you’ve learned will help customers better relate and sympathise with you. According to Psychological Science, research suggests that shared pain may have positive social consequences; shared pain acts as a “social glue” to promote solidarity and togetherness between groups.

So, tell your target audience members stories that they can relate to, instead of simply presenting your brand as perfect. You could even share stories of your customers who previously struggled but then achieved success with help from your company/product. This will not only humanise your brand, but boost sales too.

Show appreciation for your customers

Letting your customers know that you care about and appreciate them is one of the best ways to humanise your brand. So, show appreciation for your best customers by sending them company swag or offering special discounts with a personalised message.

Buffer thanked one of its stand-out customers with not only company swag, but a personalised gift. I’m sure that those customers then became lifelong fans.

buffer-value-adds

Not every company can afford to send out swag to all of their best customers, but sending a gift to just a few of your rockstar fans can go a long way. For a less costly strategy, show appreciation to new customers by simply sending a welcome/thank you email. Not only will such appreciation for your customers humanise your brand, it’ll turn those customers into brand ambassadors.

Related: How A Branded Car Can Boost Your Business

Over to you

Be prepared for your business to have a lot more die-hard customers. With these tips for humanising your brand, consumers will be able to connect with your business, relate to you on a deeper level and want to have a relationship with your company for the long term.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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Branding

How A Strong Brand Protects Your Business

Brand enthusiasts are welcome to follow Kyle Rolfe’s latest thoughts on brand building in South Africa and his analysis on relevant global trends and issues via Twitter @kylerolfeSA.

Kyle Rolfe

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intellectual-property

It is all too easy for small businesses to become victims of intellectual property theft and seeing their products and services copied by unscrupulous competitors. A clear case in point is that of Woolworths, which was recently accused of copying a baby carrier made by Ubuntu Baba, having a cheaper version made in China and selling it as its own in-house product.

Woolworths eventually apologised and withdrew its product, after Cape Town entrepreneur Shannon McLaughlin exposed similarities between the retailer’s baby carrier and that made by her company, Ubuntu Baba.

Small business owners can protect themselves from having their products or services copied by developing a strong and unique brand.

Brand uniqueness and an authentically developed product will give you a level of protection in the market, as it will be more difficult for a competitor to copy your offering.

What small business owners should avoid is the “white label solution”. This is taking any product, even one manufactured overseas, and putting your own branding and packaging on it and reselling it as your own.

There is nothing stopping your competitor from sourcing that same product and putting their branding on it and selling it as their own. In this case, as a small business owner, you would have no recourse.

Ubuntu Baba’s unique brand and authentically developed product, designed and manufactured locally, is what helped the small business successfully take on a giant retailer like Woolworths. They didn’t simply take someone else’s product and rebrand it as their own, they actually designed and built their own product.

A unique brand and product will position you as more than just a reseller and will give you a certain level of strength and protection in the market. It allows clients to differentiate you from your competitors and can also positively affect their purchasing decisions, directly impacting your profitability.

Effective branding, that is well defined and distinct, will not only help build your reputation, but it will also make you stand out from the competition.

Ultimately, your brand is your business identity. It is the image that you show to your client, making it one of your company’s most valuable assets. Effective branding portrays a company’s values and attracts the right client.

A strong brand identity also has the benefit of making your company appear bigger and stronger than your competition and consumers are generally attracted to well-established companies. So, ask yourself whether your branding conveys professionalism, reliability and trust.

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Branding

Young People Will Reward Brands That Take A Stand

A new generation of consumers are choosing to engage with the brands that share their values and beliefs.

Kian Bakhtiari

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young-people

Through much of the last century, advertising obligated people to pay attention to what brands have to say. A handful of television, radio or newspaper channels left the public with no choice but to consume the message that was being communicated. In short, attention was easy to capture, and consumers were powerless to the will of big business.

In the 21st century, we face an entirely new reality – thanks to the internet and the near universal use of social media and digital devices. Nowadays, consumers are confronted with an infinite number of choices; turning attention into one of the most valuable commodities. This is why some of the world’s biggest brands are struggling to connect with people in a meaningful way, in spite of spending billions on advertising.

The power has shifted from brands to the people

Today, online advertising is getting in the way of what people actually want to do with their lives; whether it’s reading an article, watching a documentary or surfing the web. As a consequence, ad-blocking is becoming the new normal. More than 12 million people are blocking adverts in the U.K alone. Unsurprisingly, the highest rate is amongst 16-24-year olds. It doesn’t take a genius to realise that this behaviour is only going to rise with the emergence of a digitally native generation that expects to control every aspect of their online experience.

Like most things in life, this is obvious to the man or woman on the streets, but news to the marketing department. As someone who works in advertising myself: I have experienced at first-hand the amount of time, effort and resources that goes into crafting an advertising campaign. Only for it to be summarily executed at a swipe of a button by one of my friends. Young people’s distaste for adverts also helps to explain the meteoric rise of subscription-based services like Netflix, Spotify and Twitch. These platforms act as a safe house from the constant barrage of adverts.

Related: Robert Kiyosaki on Building Brand Mystique

Young people are engaging with brands that share their values and beliefs

Instead, young people are choosing to engage with the brands that share their values and beliefs. In fact, 64 percent of consumers around the world now buy on belief. At the same time, one in two will choose, switch or boycott a brand based on its stand on a societal issue. The consumers of today are more informed and empowered than ever before. They have all the tools at their disposal to control the relationship they want to have with brands. In this new age of Information, it’s no longer enough to communicate a message, in the hope that it will resonate. To remain relevant, brands need to talk less and do more for people and planet.

The brands that have a purpose beyond profit will not only survive but thrive in this new age of conscious consumerism. Research carried out by Havas shows that meaningful brands have outperformed the stock market by 206 percent over the last 10 years. Enlightened brands recognise this reality and are transforming their entire modus operandi to meet young consumers changing expectation.

You only have to look at Adidas’s pledge to use 100 percent recycled plastic by 2024, Unilever’s mission to Improve health and well-being for more than 1 billion people and Ikea’s ambition of becoming climate positive by 2030. The results are also clear to see: Adidas sold 1 million shoes made of ocean plastic last year, Unilever’s sustainable brands are growing 50 percent faster than the rest of business and Ikea has seen sustainable product sales grow to a cool $1.9 billion.

What it all means

Historically, the role of a brand has been to simplify people’s increasingly busy lives. Today, that’s no longer enough. Young people expect brands to go beyond selling products, services or increasing profit for shareholders. They expect them to stand up for something, to improve lives and to play an active role in tackling global poverty, inequality, and climate change.

Doing good is not only the right thing to do but also a commercial imperative. For brands, this requires a move away from Corporate Social Responsibility — since under such initiatives, doing good is often separated from the core function of the business. In its place, brands need to make their products and services in a way which benefits people, planet and profit by taking responsibility for the overall value chain.

The brands that manage to adapt to this new reality will end up being richly rewarded with a natural place in popular culture, a deeper connection with consumers, business growth and longevity.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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