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Build Your Brand On Instagram By Avoiding These Common Mistakes

I’ve gathered a list of common mistakes I found while managing Instagram profiles for brand building purposes.

Adiat Disu

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With over 300 million Instagram users, I’m not surprised that I’ve been working with more companies to build their brands on digital platforms like this popular photo-sharing social media platform.

Companies are quickly finding out that  Instagram users (which mainly consist of 16 – 30 year olds) aren’t interested in corporate advertisements and obvious sales copy. It will take a little more style and creative finessing to ensure their business objectives are met on Instagram.

We-recommend-tickWe recommend: You’ll Market Better and Be More Persuasive Knowing These 10 Brain Facts

Using low quality images or not having a consistent photo theme

Instagram is a visual platform that is vital to both telling your story and building your brand.

I completely understand the temptation to take pictures on phones and simply upload, irrespective of lighting or other quality considerations, however, if you’d like to be a giant among midgets, you’ll have to invest a little more time and energy in your photos.

With a number of picture editing applications available for phones and a little bit of photography know-how, you can raise your “insta-game” with these simple principles. 

Take multiple pictures of the same object

Believe it or not, for every beautiful image you see (whether it’s in your favourite magazines, billboards, or other) it can take over 50 or more shots to get that perfect shot that comes out looking so good. Trust me, this isn’t a game.

Bloggers (especially street style bloggers), Instagramers, and those whose photos you enjoy online should be well respected and appreciated. From taking the photo, to editing the photo, creating copy and uploading it to dashboards or mobile devices, it can take  one to two hours (sometime more) to prep one photo.

Find that Filter

Find a filter and stick with it, or better yet, try not using any at all. As long as you capture your photos using a professional camera (which I highly advise), in appropriate lighting, the natural beauty of your photo will be highlighted.

We-recommend-tickWe recommend: Why I Will Leave Your Website in 7 Seconds

White space laws

Use as much white space as possible (a basic design principle that will never go out of date). It is always aesthetically pleasing and gives the appearance of a clean design (even if there is not design or skill involved).

Choose a theme and stick with it

Have a theme for your overall board and (if you feel saucy enough) each column. I’ll use a recent client, Emmaus Beauty, a natural skincare line for healing skin care line for treating skin disorders as an example.

Column one (from left to right) lays emphasis on a white background, as in column two (middle) is more for free styling and metallic grays, and column three is for plants and nature shots involving her brand or product.

1-Emmaus-Beauty-Instagram-Example-Screen-Shot

Over-use of #Hashtags

Hashtags are great when used appropriately (like anything meant for good in the world). With all things good, however, comes responsibility. If you use too many hashtags, it is possible for your posts to look spammy (many are guilty of this). Using hashtags without fully understanding the meaning or implications of the particular hashtag is also a major faux pas.

Pop culture has added, and keeps adding, layers of definitions to words and phrases we commonly use or understand. In addition to traditional dictionaries such as Webster’s dictionary (or dictionary.com), take the time to look up phrases (hashtags) in urbandictionary.com.

You’ll be surprised at the meaning that has been added to words like “chill,” as in #netflixandchill. And no, it doesn’t mean relaxing while watching your favourite shows on Netflix. #Stop #It (Note: The last use of hashtag was horrendous and meaningless. Do not try it at home).

Not updating or providing a link in bio

Your Instagram bio is the only place where you can insert an active hyperlink. I cannot tell you how many times I find that people place links in their posts, and yet fail to place the same link in their bio where it is active.

Even worse are those that don’t place any link or maintain the same link for years. Use this opportunity to liven up your page, and update your link to reflect what you’re posting.

Not interacting with anyone

Don’t be that person, who speaks about yourself and never stops to listen and/or include anyone else in the conversation.  We all like to be paid a little compliment or gentle attention here and there. Gain disciples and not just followers by encouraging others, reposting photos (always provide credits where due).

Although managing your brand on Instagram sounds like a lot of work, it will be rewarding. After all, the goal of using social is to connect, engage, and promote.

We-recommend-tickWe recommend: 8 Reasons Why Your Marketing Sucks

If a photo is worth 1 000 words, imagine what your entire Instagram profile says about you, your brand, platform and your company. Making the mistakes above could mean, loosing traffic to your site (remember link in bio), lost in potential newsletter subscribers, and even worse- leave potential customers with a bad impression.

Hiring a firm or an individual, to manage your digital presence with the right tools (camera, writing skills, and clear business objectives), could go a long way. Take the time or make the investment.

Adiat Disu, originally from Lagos, Nigeria, studied at Philips Exeter Academy and graduated from Bentley University with a degree in IT and Communications. Her experience includes a stint with US retail giants TJX Inc where Disu, as an Allocation Analyst, affected an average of $90 million in sales to over 915 retail outlets across the country. Later recruited by IBM as an operations and communications analyst, she worked with over 600 IT Analyst firms (the likes of Gartner and Ovum) before taking the initiative to launch her company Adiree, birthed to engage the social-eco friendly consumer and raise awareness, for modern African brands globally.

Online Marketing

How To Choose The Right Digital Agency

The need for specialised digital marketing has inspired an increase in digital agencies and the hunt for the right digital agency is on.

Darren Mansour

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Finding a digital partner is crucial. Many business leaders find digital marketing challenging as they are spread thin when taking on their own digital marketing efforts, resulting in half-baked digital campaigns that can often do more harm than good. The need for specialised digital marketing has inspired an increase in digital agencies and the hunt for the right digital agency is on.

So, how do you choose the right agency?

1. Understand Your Needs & Budget

The better you are able to establish your digital marketing needs the better the conversation will be with potential agencies. Consider your website, SEO, advertising, social, and design needs in order to understand the costs involved.

Set and lock down your budget accordingly. It is important to remember that there is no set price, but, keep in mind that you get what you pay for. A great digital marketing specialist will be able to work with reasonable expectations and within a reasonable budget.

Related: Crisis Management In A Digital Age

2. Demand Transparency

A lack of transparency is an immediate red flag. First, take a look at the agency’s website. If location, about me and profiles, client and agency lists, and testimonials are nowhere to be seen, then move on. If it looks like something is being hidden, it more than likely is.

Be wary of big promises on delivery, at the most affordable rate, as it is not always the best option as a large amount of new clients choose agencies with little to no experience. Full transparency should be top of your list when it comes to partnering with the right digital agency.

3. The Importance of Credibility

How credible is the agency you’re looking at and what kind of experience do they have under the belt? Dig a little deeper and read through online reviews and client testimonials. Ask yourself if it all seems authentic. If there are no client references on their website and Linkedin, ask for them.

If the agency allows contact with clients where it didn’t go too well it should be perceived as positive. There is no such thing as perfection and it shows transparency while adding to credibility. Consider the agency’s website and how well it appears in search results. Look at the agency social pages to get more insight into what you can expect.

Related: Is Your Content Golden Enough?

4. Implement The Beer Test

The connection between the business and it’s creative team needs to be based on more than the marketing of a brand. Do the beer test by inviting the key players from both sides around a table for coffee, tea, a drink, or a meal, and test to see if you can work together.

It helps when the people who work together can get on with the work and each other. Choose an agency who is aligned with your brand, persona, and availability. A brilliant business partnership goes beyond the company. In business today, it is a totally acceptable concept to buy into people. Great working relationships contribute towards producing outstanding results.

Get in touch with So Interactive to set a beer test and discuss your digital needs.

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Online Marketing

Creating Power Digital Campaigns

Here are some general guidelines on how to create a digital marketing campaign that has a real impact on your bottom line.

Darren Mansour

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Innovative ideas work only if there is a plan in place. In order to grow your brand and your industry it is important your planning focuses largely online, since digital campaigns provide valuable data, feedback and results that can help you stay agile, thinking ahead, and reactive in an increasingly volatile market space. Here are some general guidelines on how to create a digital marketing campaign that has a real impact on your bottom line.

Establish Your Mission

Define your overall business and marketing objectives. Your digital marketing mission needs to fit into your grand plan and business strategy. What are the goals you want to achieve through your digital marketing efforts? This is your mission.

Analyse Your Past & Learn From Mistakes

You shouldn’t go into the planning phase with your eyes closed. Do your homework. Analyse your digital marketing strategies, your past successes, and your failures in order to focus on setting reasonable KIPs. Set a time period you would like to look at, it is often best to make it the same length of time as the campaign you are planning. Establish if you are going to analyse a 12 months period, the previous year, a quarter, or any given month in the past year. This data is all priceless.

Related: Beginners Guide To Digital Marketing In South Africa

Know Who You Are Talking To

Determine your target market, personas, and audience. You need to put your audience at the heart of your marketing strategy and campaigns. Once you’ve identified personas, focus on their emotional needs and strive to satisfy specific desires. Develop accurate personas by considering demographics and consumer market research.

Ask yourself what the problems are that you can help your target persona solve. Establish the emotional desires, goals, likes, dislikes, and what resonates with your target persona. When you have your target persona down it is the best time to identify your influencers.

Know Your Budget

It is crucial that you define your digital marketing budget based on your strategy. Establish your paid, unpaid, and earned digital media. Allocate a reasonable portion of your budget to the specific digital channel you want to use. If needed, be prepared to make changes while your campaign is running and rolling out. Should a particular element of your paid marketing underperform, revisit your strategy and budget, then reallocate that budget to the channel or channels that are bringing you the results you need.

Establish Your Channels

Determine which of the digital marketing channels you are going to use and which are most suitable to reach your desired target audience. Clearly establish what the digital channels you choose to use are trying to achieve, and the overall benefits of using each of them. Ensure you have at least one KPI attached to each of your digital channels.

Related: Dylan Kohlstädt Of Shift One Marketing Weighs In On Digital Marketing For Start-Ups

Plan To Be Flexible

Off the bat, no plan is perfect. Not every prediction is going to be spot on. And, although you have taken all the steps in the right direction by putting together a plan that is based on measurable data, results, insights, and analytics, you won’t know exactly how consumers will react, behave, and respond to your campaigns. It is essential that you monitor progress of all your campaigns and continually measure your performance, so that you can you can be flexible enough to adapt and change your marketing plan as and when need be.

Use a Digital Marketing Calendar

Take the time to highlight the key campaigns in your strategy, see which digital elements work well together, and allocate timeframes. Google calendars and spreadsheets are a great way to create timelines, share accurate production schedules, distribute information quickly, and effectively back up documents and data. Google docs allows you to share planning and scheduling with your team and make edits if necessary.

Read The Data & Measure Results

Read past reporting, analytics, insights, data, and statistics, when strategising, changing, and planning campaigns. Keep a record and create reports during and following each campaign. Create a measurement and monitoring plan aligned with your KPIs. Add required information as you need it and make changes when it is in the best interest of the brand and bottom line. Measure the success of your individual digital marketing elements, identify what is not working and what requires change. Create clearly defined KPIs.

Your Creative is Everything

Your creative is your brand voice, and it is vital that you are always on top form. Content being king is that marketing phrase that just always rings true. What you say, how you say it, and who you say it to forms an important part of how you market your brand, it’s a vital step in the process of creating powerful digital campaigns. Quality digital content is both affordable and when managed properly it’s completely priceless.

Get The Professionals Onboard

So Interactive is a leading digital agency based in Johannesburg. Get in touch to create powerful digital campaigns that push your brand forward.

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Online Marketing

4 Key Social Media Mistakes You Might Be Making – And How To Avoid Them

Social media can revolutionise your brand presence, or do more harm than good, depending on your strategy and execution.

Terena Chetty

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Whether or not you’ve already embraced social media in your business, the facts can’t be denied. Not only is it the fastest growing global communication medium, but it’s completely revolutionised the way brands and consumers interact.

The problem is that for many businesses — large and small — it remains unchartered territory viewed with uncertainty and even a degree of suspicion.

SMEs in particular seem to struggle with social media. This could be due to a misunderstanding of the role that social media plays in business, underestimating the sheer power of it and not using it effectively as a business tool.

Here are four common mistakes many SME social media pages display and some of the solutions you can implement to overcome these shortfalls. Why should you care? Because social media is a relatively inexpensive way to really boost your brand presence — if it’s used effectively.

Let’s get started.

According to www.imagibrand.com:

“Social media marketing done the right way requires skilled talent. Your brand should never hand its social marketing over to an inexperienced marketer or marketing team without making sure there exist true capabilities and talent to develop, design, produce and execute the volume of creative needed to have successful social channels.”

1. Misconception and misuse of social media

The problem: Social media is often (and incorrectly) perceived as a ‘nice-to-have’ but unnecessary by many SMEs. I’ve met many business owners who are sceptical about social media and its place in the business environment. Sometimes, the only reason that the brand even has a social media presence is because its competitors do.

Social media is also typically viewed as a platform for brand-centred content. Some use it purely for hard-sell advertising posts, while others use it as an online company bulletin board. Both are completely ineffective ways to use social media.

Related: 10 Laws Of Social Media Marketing

Why you should care: A lack of understanding often leads to misuse, and this is particularly true of social media. A vicious cycle results: Social media is already viewed as a waste of resources, but it’s still used (incorrectly) to push sales or publish fluffy content. These strategies (or lack thereof) do little to promote business goals, strengthening the view that social media has no place in business. An example of a self-fulfilling prophecy if ever there was one.

Worse still is the misconception that your social media pages are there to solely promote brand objectives. This could cause serious brand damage as social media users expect, no, demand, attention and value from brands. Failure to meet such needs risks losing current and potential clients that perceive the brand as being ‘self-centred’.

What you should be doing: Social media is a powerful business tool and should be treated as such. It has the capability to serve as an integral component of your organisation, and as a key catalyst for growth. For SMEs, social media holds incredible value, including the options of extensive audience reach, detailed consumer targeting and sales generation. Effective, well-strategised use of social media is the path to achieving these tangible returns.

From a content perspective, the main point to remember is this: It’s not about you. Unless you’re Kim Kardashian, nobody cares.

Social media is all about the user experience. When creating a post, view it from an audience perspective to ensure it has user-value of some sort. Ask yourself these questions: Is it informative? Is it interesting? Is it useful? Is it entertaining? If you can’t answer yes to at least one or two of these questions, don’t post it. Research your audience and craft posts that they are likely to engage with (i.e. like, comment and share).

According to dreamgrow.com, 46% of users will stop following a brand’s social media platforms for sharing too much promotional content.

2. Assigning management of platforms to junior and/or untrained staff

social-media-marketing-advice

The problem: Most SMEs view social media management as a non-essential, non-priority task. The general practice seems to be assigning this role to junior and/or untrained staff, such as interns, receptionists or any employee that happens to be available.

Why you should care: Consider this. A social media page is potentially the single most impactful touchpoint for a brand, making it a highly critical, powerful and very public portal. And then consider that many SMEs assign complete management and control of this critical contact point to junior or untrained staff. Can you spot the reason for concern?

Not only does this open you up to risk ranging from an undesirable public reaction to an unsuitable post or response, but in serious cases, could also result in legal action.

Aside from such drastic situations, poorly or inadequately managed social media pages generally lead to a negative consumer perception of the brand as a whole.

What you should be doing: Treat the position of social media manager the same as any other role: Assign it to an individual with the required knowledge and experience. As most SMEs are unlikely to already have a social media expert within their team, this could mean recruiting a new employee or agency.

While this sounds like an awesome solution, it may not be practical for SMEs with budget restrictions. In this case, consider ways to use current resources. For example, get managers of different departments to provide input and suggestions for content, as well as approve relevant posts. If possible, assign non-critical tasks to junior staff as a means to free up time that senior staff can then dedicate to social media.

Related: 7 Social Media Marketing Secrets No Marketer Wants To Admit

3. Not using paid advertising

The problem: SMEs often allocate little or no financial resources to their social media activities, such as Facebook paid ads. Instead, they rely on organic reach or inbound audiences.

Why you should care: For someone to see an unpaid post, they would need to actively search for your page themselves. This is the equivalent of leaving a stack of printed flyers on a table in a corner and hoping that people would stumble across it.

The recent Facebook Feed change further necessitates the need for paid advertising — the new algorithm restricts the organic reach of business pages. This means that the only way to get any real exposure is through paid promotion.

What you should be doing: Paid advertising means that you actively distribute your message to consumers. Your content appears directly in users’ content feed — they are exposed to your message even if they have never heard of your brand. What’s better, targeting means that you can restrict this to your desired demographic — it’s like handing out those above-mentioned flyers to a room full of people who have already indicated interest in your product or service offering. The result? High conversion potential and little to no wastage on irrelevant market segments.

(At this point, you may be shouting that you don’t have money for paid advertising. But keep calm and read on.)

Social media advertising is highly affordable. For example, Facebook promotions start from as little as R100 a post. Even though realistically you would need to invest a bit more to get decent results, the point is that it’s accessible even on a shoestring budget. Important: Read up on the dos and don’ts when attempting paid advertising for the first time (especially regarding setting spend limits).

4. No structured social media strategy

The problem: The vast majority of SMEs have a social media presence that lacks any sort of structured strategy. This is evidenced by a number of factors, including erratic frequency of posting, unclear purpose of posts, and even content that holds little relevance for a brand.

Why you should care: Without a planned strategy, your social media activities lack purpose. Any business task that serves no clear function or purpose is a waste of resources. It’s no wonder that decision-makers are reluctant to invest in social media as a result.

“Almost 90% of marketers say their social marketing efforts have increased exposure for their business, and 75% say they’ve increased traffic.” — www.smallbiztrends.com

Related: 5 Tips To Generate Sales Leads Through Social Media

What you should be doing: Rather than being an isolated function, social media activities have to form part of an integrated strategy linked to core brand objectives. The starting point is to identify priorities across your entire organisation, and then list key focus points. For example, if you have a current promotion, you can drive sales by targeting consumers through a paid social media ad. If you are looking to grow brand awareness, you can create user-centric content crafted for high reach and engagement. If your current focus is on product development, send out a poll to gain insight into consumer preferences.

Once planned, content then has to be crafted and scheduled to form a well-balanced strategy. This then needs to be tactically executed accordingly, incorporating a budget for social media ad spend to realise tangible results.

A result-driven strategy means that you can now measure return on investment. This includes social media generated stats (such as engagement rates and brand reach), as well as business data (such as sales volumes or leads). And once the numbers are out, my prediction is that decision-makers will become much more willing to allocate resources towards social media activities.

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