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8 Valuable And Inspirational Web Series You Should Check Out

Have 20 minutes to an hour to watch a show? Try one of these and learn something at the same time.

Jonathan Long

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Tim Ferris

Thanks to the popularity of online video content, it’s never been easier to learn from wildly successful entrepreneurs. In fact, many of today’s most influential entrepreneurs will let you watch a day in their life through an online web series or a YouTube channel. Several others host online shows, where they share advice and insights related to their entrepreneurial journey.

If you aren’t taking advantage of the wealth of first-hand knowledge and experience that is being recorded every day by successful entrepreneurs in the trenches, you’re missing out.

Never before has there been this much front-row access –available in video content that you can consume anywhere and at any time.

Personally, I’ve started to consume a lot more video content when I have down time. I’ll watch an episode when I’m doing cardio at the gym or when I have some time to kill waiting for a flight. Here are eight web series that I have been consuming recently that I have found to be valuable. I know these aren’t the only ones, so I would love to hear your recommendations in the comments section below.

1DailyVee

gary vaynerchuk dailyvee

Gary Vaynerchuk -Dailyvee

Documenting his life as a serial entrepreneur and CEO, Gary Vaynerchuk’s daily vlog, DailyVee, provides viewers an inside look into what it’s really like being a successful public figure in today’s digital age. I respect Vaynerchuk tremendously because of his no-fluff and no-BS approach.

He says it like it is and documents his daily life to show that this game requires work – much more than most are willing to output. You won’t see fancy cars, bling-bling or any of that other nonsense in the DailyVee – just pure work and dedication to winning.

Related: 49 Inspirational Quotes And Mantras To Help You Overcome The Stress Of Running A Business

2Power Players

power-players-grant-cardone

Grant Cardone – Power Players

Internationally recognised sales mogul Grant Cardone interviews CEOs, bestselling authors, entrepreneurs, marketers and those making big moves big plays in their industries on his show, Power Players.

The conversations with the top game changers in the world are both engaging and informative. By watching these episodes, entrepreneurs are exposed to actionable takeaways that can be applied to their own businesses.

3The Bottom Line

Brad Lea

Brad Lea – The Bottom Line

The Bottom Line, hosted by virtual training and business expert Brad Lea, is a video series about lessons learned. These lessons are aimed at giving viewers insight and perspective on topics ranging from business expertise to life advice, and also inject Brad’s unique and sometimes controversial point of view.

Lea is an entrepreneur who is on the front lines of building a fast-growing software company and brand and he tells it like it is, rarely holding back.

Related: 14 Leaders Share Their Inspirational Advice On Starting A Business

4The Pursuit

Kelsey Humphreys

Kelsey Humphreys – The Pursuit

Whether you’re pursing a lifelong dream, overcoming an obstacle or contemplating giving up, The Pursuit validates that you’re not alone. Hosted by advertising expert and entrepreneur Kelsey Humphreys, the show features industry leaders sharing wisdom that is aimed to equip viewers for success in their own journey.

It’s a very entertaining series that really focuses on self-improvement, which is something all entrepreneurs can benefit from.

5True Inspirations

true-inspirations

True Inspirations is a video series highlighting the journeys of truly inspirational people. From athletes to entrepreneurs, True Inspirations puts the spotlight on those who are not only making a difference in their communities, but also making a lasting impact on their industry.

The series provides entrepreneurs with meaningful stories about those who have not only overcome challenges, but more importantly, followed their dreams.

Related: 50 Inspirational Quotes To Help You Achieve Your Goals

6Behind the Brand

Behind the Brand tim ferris

Behind the Brand with Tim Ferris

Produced and hosted by former Universal Studios marketing executive Bryan Elliott, Behind the Brand features interviews from the world’s top movers and shakers, including Magic Johnson, Tim Ferriss and Tony Robbins, to name a few. The show focuses on providing an inside look into the minds of the best in business, across multiple industries.

7Spartan Up!

Spartan Up!

Spartan Up!

Nothing says grit and resilience like the Reebok Spartan Race. Founder and CEO Joe Desena travels the world interviewing authors, athletes, CEOs and thought leaders who encourage viewers to shift their thinking. The Spartan Up! series brings insight from all aspects of life, and provides entrepreneurs with actionable tips and advice that can be used in their own business.

Related: Woke Up With A Dark Cloud Today? Read These 10 Pieces Of Inspiration From Entrepreneurs

8Business & Burgers

business-and-burgers

Business and Burgers

Co-hosted by Scott Duffy and Alan Taylor, Business & Burgers features a unique take by combining valuable business advice with the search for the world’s best burger. This interview-style show involves noteworthy guests sharing their tips and advice related to running successful ventures, while adding a fun foodie twist. It’s a very creative and unique angle that commands attention and delivers quality content.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

Jonathan Long is the president and CEO of Market Domination Media, a Miami Beach-based online marketing agency that specializes in content marketing, web design and search engine optimization (SEO). Market Domination Media uses innovative outside-the-box thinking when it comes to developing online-marketing strategies.

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Self Development

3 Wonderfully Uncommon Reasons To Form Better Habits

As we race away into 2018, consider these very personal and fundamental bonuses to making and sticking to your resolutions.

Entrepreneur

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business-man-habits

Eat healthier. Exercise more. Be more productive. Read faster. Be friendlier. Sleep better.

Welcome to the New Year, a time when people set resolutions to form better habits and lead better lives.

Understandably, a lot of the articles, videos and other resources about starting off the New Year focus on which habits are best and the steps you need to take to achieve them. They outline the goals, plans and actions we need to make our resolutions a reality.

If you’re looking for 10 tips on how to lose 100 pounds in 90 days, then this article isn’t for you. Instead, why not consider some of the underlying and lesser-talked about benefits of kicking bad habits and forming better ones this year.

1. Challenging your norms

Why is it that you sneak sweets and junk food so often? How come you’re always so tired in the morning? Why can’t you get your butt to the gym?

Related: 7 Motivational Habits That Drive Millionaires

If your answer for poor habits is “That’s just the way I am/the way things are” then you’re probably underestimating yourself. Stop. Think about your actions and why you’ve taken them perpetually over time. You might learn a lot.

Take personal finance advisor and entrepreneur Ramit Sethi for example. When he stopped to analyse himself and why he wasn’t going to the gym, he realised something simple that he’d never considered previously: His closet was in a different room, separate from his bedroom. Instead of getting up in the cold to put on clothes, it was easier to just stay in bed.

“Once I realised this, I folded my clothes and shoes the night before. When I woke up the next morning, I would roll over and see my gym clothes sitting on the floor. The result? My gym attendance soared by over 300%.”

Forming a new habit is your chance to examine your life — or at least one important aspect of it — and figure out why you’ve been making the decisions that lead to the habits you want or need to change.

2. Taking control

We don’t have to be the sum of randomised actions and results, based simply on moral and civil codes. It’s up to each one of us individually to take control of our actions and maximise the results.

It’s the same in business. There’s nothing you do without careful research and consideration in order to maximise productivity, profits, etc.

You’re your own boss. You control your thoughts and actions; these things aren’t up to chance. Having the ability to make significant changes to your life is empowering, so long as you seize the opportunity.

Take control. Be the entrepreneur of yourself, 100 percent.

Related: 7 Bad Workplace Habits Millennials Need To Stop Making

3. Achieving clearer self-awareness

Some people say it takes only 21 days to form a new habit. Others say that just isn’t true. However long it takes, habit formation is a personal journey; one that requires desire, motivation, dedication, perseverance and change.

Habit formation takes you out of your comfort zone, to a place of self-discovery. If you’re getting into shape, how far can you push yourself physically? If you’re trying to eat better, how much temptation can you withstand?

Figure out what was required to succeed or why it was that you failed. Either way, you can obtain a clearer sense of your personal limits and, hopefully, how to achieve your goals — and sustain them — within your constraints.

As Benjamin Franklin said, “Your net worth to the world is usually determined by what remains after your bad habits are subtracted from your good ones.” Not only to the world, but to yourself as well.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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Self Development

How To Build A Disruptive Attitude

What does it mean to navigate a disruptive world and succeed in a market – place that is changing faster than it’s ever changed before?

Nadine Todd

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malcolm-gladwell

What do you need to know to be a success? What resources and support do you need? How do you need to feel and think to be a success in a disrupted world?

According to Malcolm Gladwell, who spoke at the 2017 BCX Disrupt Summit, you need three key things to succeed in a disrupted world: Resources, knowledge and the right attitude.

The First step towards innovation and disruption is your mind. Your attitude.

For Gladwell, Malcolm McLean is the single biggest disruptor of the 20th century, in that he implemented containerised shipping. Without this fundamental shift in the way we ship cargo, the modern, connected world as we know it today would not exist.

Crucially, McLean did not invent containerised shipping, but no one had been able to make it work before a trucker from Ohio came along, and got irritated by how long he had to wait at the docks to offload his cargo (roughly 24 hours).

Related: How to Build Your Network Like a Super Connector

But McLean had an idea and he presented it at a conference of maritime shippers in Amsterdam. They laughed him off the stage. Normally, when we are treated with this type of derision, we get discouraged and give up. McLean didn’t do that. He possessed a fundamental trait that all entrepreneurs need: He didn’t require the approval of others to do what he believed was right. Entrepreneurs are open, creative, and see solutions to problems that others don’t; they are also — crucially — highly conscientious, which means they follow through on an idea in a detailed, disciplined way.

This is rare. You get creative people, and conscientious people, but it’s not easy to find both traits in the same person. Add to that the third trait of disagreeableness, in that they do not have to follow established norms, and you have a real game-changer.

McLean didn’t look at the problem as a shipper did. He came from an entirely new angle, and not only found a way to make containerised shipping possible, but affordable too.

Ikea is a similar example. In a nutshell, Ikea is furniture shipped flat from Poland. Ingvar Kamprad pursued outsourcing on an aggressive level, had an extraordinary amount of creativity in solving problems, and was very conscientious. Consider how difficult it would have been to build a world-class manufacturing plant in Poland in 1961. The country was a post-WW2 mess, in the grip of Soviet Russia, known for shoddy workmanship and actively hostile to free enterprise.

And then Kamprad waltzed in from Sweden and pulled off the impossible because of his single-minded grit and attention to detail. He is the epitome of conscientiousness and obsessiveness.

Now consider Steve Jobs.

By the 1970s, Xerox was the most important tech company in the world. They were the richest, most innovative and profitable company, and they invested in a state-of-the-art R&D centre and filled it with 100 of the most brilliant computer scientists from around the world, and told them to be brilliant.

And they were. As per Xerox’s request, they reinvented the office. They invented the laser printer, the world’s first word processing programme, interfaces — and the list continues.

And then a 23-year-old Steve Jobs visited the centre. At that stage, his company was making traditional kit computers out of a garage. He was blown away by what he saw at Xerox Park and all the incredible things they were doing — particularly when he was shown the mouse and interface the Xerox team had developed for personal computers. He immediately saw how icons and a mouse changed everything. This was the future of computing.

Related: 10 Innovators On What They Learned From Steve Jobs

Leading the charge

Here’s why Apple is the world’s biggest tech company four decades later, and Xerox is not: While the Xerox team understood they had changed computing forever, there was no urgency to be the first to market.

Jobs left that day, immediately told his team to stop what they were doing, because it would soon be obsolete anyway, and started working on a new product based on what Xerox had developed.

His team told him he was nuts — they’d spent millions on what they were doing. Jobs said it didn’t matter. It was obsolete. He didn’t have more resources. He didn’t have smarter guys. He didn’t even have a wiser and better vision.

But he was in a hurry. And he was able to execute on his vision.

If you can get your mindset right, you can gather the resources and knowledge that you need to be successful. Learn as much as you can. Be open to new ideas. And if something is soon going to be obsolete, walk away. Find the next big thing. Because you’re either being disrupted, or you’re the disruptor. Which would you like to be?

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Self Development

Time Is The Ultimate Success, Not Money

Don’t use your time to make more money, use your money to make more time.

Steve Eakin

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time-management

Why do we work so much? I know the answer is “money,” but why? Yes, we need to cover our cost of living – your true basics like food, clothes and shelter. But after that, what are we working for?

The short answer is luxury. We want to get our hands on some luxury.

For some, that’s cars, watches, boats and all of the other flashy things we see scrolling through Instagram. For others, it’s art or travel. Everyone has their own definition of luxury.

But that shouldn’t be the reason for our lifetime of toil. It should be for time. You see, time is the true measure of success – the real currency of an entrepreneur.

We work our lives away to buy objects of luxury instead of enjoying the luxury of our time on earth. We should be yearning for free time to do what we wantnot what we must. We should want time to do the things we like, not the things we dislike. Forget the desk job. Forget cleaning the house. Forget mowing the lawn or cooking dinner. If you don’t like it, the luxury of having extra money should eliminate it from your life.

This isn’t a rant promoting unadulterated laziness. I’m a firm believer in work, especially deep work in your creative pursuits and hard labour in your physical pursuits. I’m also a firm believer in not doing what you hate.

Related: 7 Rules To Master Your Start-Up Success This Year

For my own creative enjoyment, I enjoy writing – both words and code. That’s my deep work, and no matter how much money I have, I’ll never outsource that. In the physical world, I enjoy lifting weights, fighting and doing yard work. Those are things that I won’t be cutting down anytime soon. Since I enjoy those things, my time isn’t better spent eliminating them from my life. But certain aspects of them can certainly go.

I love weight training, but I hate planning my workouts. It takes me too long to figure it all out. Thankfully, that’s a problem that money solved in my life. I have an amazing trainer who sets it all up for me, giving me my time back. I love writing, but I hate publishing my work. Thankfully, you can hire a content manager (or team) to handle that. Prime examples of money buying my ultimate luxury – time. Time that can be better spent doing things that either make me more money, which I can use to unlock more free time, or that I enjoy, like reading or hanging out on a beach with my family.

Maybe I want to tighten up my Jiu Jitsu game. Maybe I want to create a cool bonsai tree. Maybe I want to learn to play chess or learn a some new tech that could advance me in the professional world. Maybe I just want to sit on my ass and read or play a video game or watch some mindless tv for an hour every now and again. These are things that we work for.

Freedom versus the slavery of materialism

Only after you’ve unlocked your free time is it even worth pursuing the material. Fancy cars aren’t my style, so why would I waste money that could be used unlocking my freedom, on a cool car? Unless you truly enjoy driving cars (which I do,) washing cars (which I don’t,) fixing cars (meh) and everything else that comes along with it, you’re spending your time to make money to buy something you don’t truly love. That’s backwards.

Related: 3 Questions To Guide You To Success In 2018

Love to travel, but only get one week long vacation a year? Go somewhere for a month or two. When you’re not working a full-time job, you’ll have the time to explore new ways of making a living if you want more months like that.

Do you really love exotic cars and want a Ferrari, but you’re just settling on the Mercedes? Take that money, buy some more time, and spend it building a business that makes you the money instead of your boss. Instead of that Benz, put that money into buying more time. That’s now what defines you as successful.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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