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Tap your Inner Energy for Success

Energise your entrepreneurial roles through creative archetypes.

Gopal Ramasammy-Cook

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An archetype is a powerful creative resource. While the concept has its origins in Jungian psychology, in a purely creative context an archetype is just a type of character in a story. Rather than being prescriptive, I hope this exploration will encourage you to devise a set of archetypal metaphors that is congruent with your own entrepreneurial journey.

Great stories mirror life

Joseph Campbell, a scholar in world mythologies, discovered a single underlying pattern in all the great stories. Chris Vogler adapted and popularised this monomyth for modern story writers. The monomyth charts the journey of a hero on a quest for some desired objective. Several archetypal characters either facilitate or hamper the hero’s progress. These are the herald who announces a call to adventure, the shadow or villain, mentors, allies, shape-shifters, threshold guardians, and tricksters. Vogler argues that  satisfying stories contain a well-crafted mix of these archetypes.

Moving now from mythology to life, Carol Pearson defined several archetypes that we adopt . We start life as the innocent who trusts everything. Then comes the orphan, who has been wounded, and trusts nothing. At some point a split occurs, and some of us become carers, while others become warriors. Later, dissatisfied with the status-quo, we become wanderers in search of alternatives. Carers become more warrior-like, and warriors become more caring. Eventually, a magician emerges, who understands that all is exactly as it should be. In shedding the driving urgency to change the world, the magician is paradoxically able to bring about more profound change.

The business lesson

So what does this mean for you? As entrepreneurs we are called upon to play a variety of roles. Embracing these to create what we desire can feel overwhelming and even inauthentic. In my experience, this happens when we fail to clearly understand the roles we need to play and what these require of us.

Naming the roles as archetypes and exploring their qualities and relevance to ones entrepreneurial journey is a creative way to balance personal authenticity with entrepreneurial effectiveness. To illustrate this, I chose five archetypes that I have found useful in my own entrepreneurial endeavors.

I borrowed three of these from Arthur Koestler, for whom the personae of artist, jester, and sage were central to creativity. For entrepreneurial creativity, I added a fourth – the merchant, and a fifth – the actor. Each of these embody different, though overlapping, flavors of entrepreneurial creativity.

The Artist is concerned with elegance and inspiration, and zestfully engages with the processes and products of creation.

The Jester sees the world in unusual ways, and challenges conventional wisdom by asking why things should be the way they are.

The Sage embodies the dimensions of knowledge and wisdom.

The Merchant applies entrepreneurial creativity to the pressing question of how to bring value to the world for the benefit of both the creator and receiver.

The Actor gives full expression to each role, embracing it fully. The versatile actor also steps out of one role and into another when required, and does not become so attached to any role that it is identified as being one with the core self.

At the end of the play, the well-rounded actor is ultimately able to divest of all roles, and authentically embrace the true self.

Gopal Ramasammy-Cook is a member of the ICF Chapter Cape Town.The International Coach Federation, the world’s largest resource for professional coaches. He is also a Zestware coach and facilitator. For more information visit the Zestware website.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Rae Nash

    Sep 28, 2011 at 09:30

    A concise summary of the archetypes. Fun to look at oneself to see what particular archetype one is using in a specific situation…ie what hat have we donned for the occasion.

  2. Rae Nash

    Sep 28, 2011 at 09:31

    A concise summary of the archetypes. Fun to look at oneself to see what particular archetype one is using in a specific situation…ie what hat have we donned for the occasion.

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Self Development

The 5 Gut-Check Questions Confronting Entrepreneurs Every Day

The day you forget why you began is the day you’re done.

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https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/314209

Entrepreneurs make an astounding number of decisions daily. They are faced with choosing which opportunities to move on and must solve problems big and small.

By setting up a framework of questions to ask yourself daily, you’ll give yourself some markers to help guide you through these difficult situations. Knowing where you stand on these questions will empower you to make good choices that ultimately lead you to your desired outcome. It will give you a deeper understanding of your motivations and your feelings about your business, and can help you clarify future plans.

Here are five powerful questions all entrepreneurs should ask themselves daily to ensure they are consistently moving toward their goals and making the best decisions for themselves and their business. Ask yourself these questions with an honest and open mind, and see where they take you.

1. Why are you doing this?

What makes this one little question so powerful is that it forces you to examine your desires and impulses, and helps you chart how those motivations change over time. It forces you to look at things from a different perspective. Asking yourself this question every day reaffirms your ambitions and the mindset behind why you are doing what you’re doing. If you don’t know why, you’re in trouble!

Related: Entrepreneurship Is All About Overcoming Obstacles

Asking this question opens the door to a plethora of other questions that will give you food for thought. What is the reason for launching your business? Why are you passionate about doing this? Are you the right person to run this business? These answers may change over time. At first it may seem difficult to truly nail down the “why” behind your motivations. Maybe there are competing interests that are driving you. But when you really think about it and drill down into this question, there’s probably a simple answer. Just be sure you’re being truthful with yourself.

Why you do something also gives rise to the question: what do you hope to achieve? You need to know what your end game looks like, and what success means to you. Is it about attaining a certain level of wealth? Is it about being the top in your market? Is it about earning respect? Are you looking to rule the world (or at least a niche market), or are you simply hoping to earn a living doing something you love?

Start your day by asking yourself this question and see where your answer takes you. By spending a few minutes pondering this, you’ll gain clarity that will help you steer your career in the direction you want it to go.

2. What is your company’s purpose?

purposeSee if you can answer this question in a single sentence. A good place to start is with your mission statement: what are the formal aims, goals and values of your company or organisation? This should be clear and concise – it should get to the heart of what your business is about.

Your company’s purpose is the foundation that all else is built on. It should have enough flexibility to grow and allow for change, but be specific enough to be meaningful and relevant. Ultimately, this question should help you understand what the heck you’re really doing here.

This question should be at the forefront of your mind when making important decisions. Ask yourself whether this new venture or idea would reinforce or logically contribute to your company’s overall purpose. Are you staying true to your calling?

That’s not to say that your purpose can’t change over time. However, if it does, the change should be purposeful and executed with care. Thinking about this will help you identify your long-term business goals and may lead to bigger questions, such as: What do you want your company to mean to your customers, what is your company’s place in world and what is its ideal market?

3. Where is your business at right now?

The goal with this question is to take both an analytical and emotional assessment of your business. This is a chance for you to take a hard look at where your company sits. Is it on the right track? What seems amiss? What is going right and how can that be reproduced throughout your business?

It’s also important to acknowledge your emotions and to be mindful of how you are feeling about your business. What is your gut instinct saying? Are you feeling anxious or excited about the business? Whether you are having negative emotions or positive ones, it’s important to recognise what you’re feeling and why you’re feeling that way.

This will give you a chance to better understand your mental state and how that may be influencing your decision making. It’s also about understanding what kind of vibe you are putting out. Are you feeling clear-minded and balanced? Or are you feeling off-kilter and out of sorts?

Being in tune with your emotions and having a clear view of what’s going on with your business will ensure you’re on an even keel. It will help you avoid overreacting or under-reacting to situations.

Related: Attention Black Entrepreneurs: Start-Up Funding From Government Grants & Funds

4. What lessons are you learning?

Every entrepreneur faces an uphill battle to achieve success. Every day you should be learning and growing, and the best way to do this is through a great deal of reflection on the lessons that present themselves each day.

Ask yourself whether you’re learning from your mistakes. Failure is a part of every entrepreneur’s journey. The question is, will your mistakes allow you to learn and grow? If not, you’re liable to fall into the same pitfalls and missteps. Conversely, are you learning when to jump at an opportunity and when to let it go? This is the ultimate lesson every entrepreneur is trying to learn, and it’s never an easy one.

The next time you’re weighing whether or not to take a risk, try asking yourself: “When I’m 80, will I feel sorry if I hadn’t gone for it?” Jeff Bezos does this as a way to crystallise whether he will regret not taking action on something. In the big picture, it’s often what we fail to do that we see as our biggest mistakes in life.

5. What’s next?

If you ask yourself one question every day, this should be it. As an entrepreneur, you always need to be anticipating what’s next. You need to anticipate what’s coming down the road and formulate a plan to take it on. This is the question that forces you to look up from that pile of work on your desk and think about the big picture and next steps for your business.

What strategies will you need as you keep pushing your business into the future? What trends or shifting interests are coming up that may affect your business? How will new technology impact the way you manage the company?

Disruption will happen in every market because change is inevitable. Businesses that survive see that wave coming and start making adjustments early on. So, in a way, change is predictable because it will always come. Innovation and ingenuity will always be the key to success – and those who seize opportunity will ride the crest of the next wave.

So when you ask yourself “What’s next?” make sure you have your blinders off and are looking at things with a curious and open mind. Make sure you’re staying open to new ideas and embracing creative solutions. Keeping looking for the “wow” factor.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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Self Development

5 Inspiring Quotes From Madiba To Stir You Into Action On Mandela Day

In honour of Mandela Day, here are 5 of Nelson Mandela’s most inspiring quotes.

Casandra Visser

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Bouncing Back

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“Do not judge me by my successes, judge me by how many times I fell down and got back up again.”

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Self Development

25 Bad Words That Make Other People Feel Inferior

If the harshest thing you have to say about someone is partly true, say the other part.

John Rampton

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Did you know that in every language, there are more negative words than positive ones? It seems we need lots of words to describe our negative feelings, but we’re content with a handful of positive ones.

For instance, researchers have found that most cultures have words for seven basic emotions: Joy, fear, anger, sadness, disgust, shame and guilt.

That’s one positive emotion, and six negative

It’s no wonder so many of us have a hard time keeping our negative comments in check. Over the past six months I’ve been working on the verbal language that I’ve been using that I don’t even realize hurts others and in some cases makes them feel inferior. I even noticed that I’ve used a couple on my personal and business website. This is a “no-no” that I needed to fix.

This post will list 25 negative words you should avoid…so that you stop hurting, belittling and intimidating those around you!

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