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How To Tackle It All In Your Business When There Is Just So Much To Do

It takes physical effort, technology and the right mindset to effectively manage everything there is to do.

John Rampton

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I have never worn as many hats as I do now as the founder and CEO of Due. That’s because I’m overseeing its growth and development, marketing, business strategy and daily operations while still managing my personal brand, networking, traveling, doing speaking engagements and more. It never stops, and I love that. However, trying to continually stay on top of everything and do it well is definitely a challenge. It reminds me I’m human and not a superhero.

It takes physical effort, technology and the right mindset to effectively manage everything there is to do. Here are some ways I stay on top of everything:

Keep to a schedule

The most important thing I do is have a formal structure to my day. It keeps me on task, especially on the daily operations work I have to take care of, plus it helps me carve out time for taking care of all aspects of the business. I get up and go to bed at nearly the same time every day so that I can stick to a clockwork schedule.

Related: Multitasking Doesn’t Work. Use This 100-Year-Old Method To Get Stuff Done

It takes time at first to plot out what this regimen looks like for you. There are also times I do have to make changes to it, such as when I travel or there are fires to put out. However, the main structure always stays so I know where to get back to once the unexpected is handled.

There is no way I could get as much done if I winged it every day and changed when I got up, ate meals and took care of my email, daily projects and meetings. It’s too easy to lose track of what little time you have this way.

It’s okay to delegate

As part of the physical aspects of tackling everything, I do outsource work and delegate to trusted team members. While I did not always have people around me to help, even a one-man band that is starting small can begin to add freelancers as the budget allows.

It’s important to implement this assistance from the start because there will be a point in time when you suddenly realize you can’t do it all and have to stop to find others who can come on board. Since I’ve always had at least one freelancer from the start, I could delegate more to this person as I scaled up until I could see the freelancer had reached a limit and then I added another.

Physically, I was still tackling it all with my business, but the additional talent that I was managing was handling some of the more time-intensive projects so I could continue focusing on expanding the company. Start with people that you may already trust, including any family or friends who have specific skills that you can work with.

Also, add people that come via referrals from trusted colleagues or those within your network. Later on, you can resort to larger talent pools, but I’ve always worked from the inside out of my circle because I felt more comfortable delegating tasks that impact the state of my business this way.

Technology saves the day

technology-development

I’m not sure I could actually do everything I do with my business if it wasn’t for technology. It is the true game changer in terms of maximizing time and money. The integrated platforms that I use to track and handle projects, collaborate with others, fill in and file any forms, and communicate with others eliminates many time-consuming tasks. I use automatic bill pay and online payments to handle all my obligations and freelancer payments.

I’ve automated as many aspects of my business as possible. That means that social media is handled through tools like Buffer while WordPress, Google Docs and Slack provide time-saving capabilities to oversee marketing, content and communication. I also have apps for my calendar and schedule as well as use my own time-tracking tool to oversee my productivity. Now, I am adding an AI-enabled chatbot to help with email and other basic correspondence.

Look for technology that takes out paperwork, is cloud-based so you can use it anywhere, and that integrates with other tools so you can remove repetitive tasks and automate as much as possible. It’s essentially delegating much of what I do to technology so I work smarter.

Related: 101 Efficiency Hacks For Busy Entrepreneurs

Stay mentally ready

I’m ready to take on the world every day and am not put off at all by the mountain of responsibilities I have in running and growing my business. My attitude is “bring it.” It’s important to stay positive, maintain a sense of humor so you see the funny side of even stressful situations, and stay determined to make success happen. I also reflect with gratitude on what I’ve done so far. In looking back, I realise what I was able to accomplish already once seemed impossible so when I look ahead and see hurdles, I know I can fly over them.

Surround yourself with positive people who have a similar perspective and enjoy the same adrenalin rush that comes with tackling everything a business can throw at you. I have a supportive wife, friends and colleagues that are just as positive – if not more – who cheer me on and believe I can do it.

Mistakes happen

Nothing is perfect. Despite working toward that end, I realise things will happen and to-dos will get overlooked in the rush or when the unexpected comes up and takes over. Recognize where these mistakes occurred, don’t beat yourself up over them, and look for ways to minimise or eliminate those from happening again.

Related: 5 Distractions That Are Productivity Poison (And How To Avoid Them)

Everything is a learning experience that has been put in front of you for a reason: You can choose to panic or you can see a way to improve it.

No one can truly do it all, especially when you hit that tipping point of growth when you start rapidly scaling up. However, these tips and having an extremely awesome team surrounding you can make you come very close to tackling everything that is thrown at you and doing it well.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

John Rampton is an entrepreneur, investor, online marketing guru and startup enthusiast. He is founder of the online invoicing company Due. John is best known as an entrepreneur and connector. He was recently named #2 on Top 50 Online Influencers in the World by Entrepreneur Magazine and has been one of the Top 10 Most Influential PPC Experts in the World for the past three years. He currently advises several companies in the San Francisco Bay area.

Work Life Balance

Distractions Are Hurting You More Than You Realise: Here’s Why

Research shows that returning to your original focus, following a distraction, takes, on average, a full 23 minutes and 15 seconds.

Jayson Demers

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For most American professionals, distractions are a normal part of life. You’ll get an email notification in the middle of a project, or a text during a meeting, or you’ll notice an interesting article on social media when you’re trying to focus on a solo task.

Then you’ll dive down that rabbit hole to learn more about it.

On a surface level, distractions range from the pleasant and barely noticeable to the mildly annoying, but they may be affecting you more than you realise.

Building and getting back your focus

For some people, passing distractions never seem to cost much time. They’ll take 30 seconds or a minute to look at their phone, or even two minutes to scroll through their Facebook news feed; then they’ll return to work. But, if this doesn’t sound like you, you may be in the extreme minority, considering that 90 percent of employees self-report using social media during work hours.

Related: For Vusi Thembekwayo, Focus Leads To Big Wins

Unfortunately, those minutes-long expenditures are only the tip of the iceberg. The time you spend on the distraction itself is trivial in most cases, but you also have to incorporate, in that “lost” time, the minutes it takes your brain to regain its focus on your initial task. And according to a study from the University of California-Irvine, that return to your original focus, following a distraction, takes, on average, a full 23 minutes and 15 seconds.

In other words, if you’re distracted at least once every 23 minutes, there’s a good chance you’ll never ramp up to your fully focused potential.

The dangers of multitasking

As if that weren’t bad enough, getting distracted also forces your brain to multitask; you won’t bring a project neatly to a close, so you’ll keep working on it to some degree while you attempt to shift your attention to another task competing for your attention.

This is bad for several reasons. According to Stanford neuroscientist Russ Poldrack, if you learn new information while multitasking, that information can get sent to the wrong part of the brain. You may feel that you’re paying attention in a meeting and reading up about a new creative brief at the same time, but chances are you won’t retain information from either source.

On top of that, the brain isn’t designed for multitasking; there are steeper metabolic costs to shifting your attention, which means the brain consumes far more oxygenated glucose during the changeover. If you switch back and forth between tasks often enough, you could feel disoriented, or even exhausted.

In addition, your brain will produce more cortisol, a stress hormone that often leads to irritability, aggression and impulsive behaviour.

The gateway distraction

It’s also important to consider the fact that most of our modern distractions have the potential to occupy far more than just a few minutes of our time. Most social media apps, for example, are designed to be addictive; they give you just enough of a reward to keep you using them; they provide no sense of completeness because of their infinite-scrolling potential and they constantly give you notifications so you can see what’s new.

If you aren’t careful, a quick look at your newsfeed can turn into a 30-minute long dive into the digital world.

Related: This Isn’t The Army: Why It’s Important To Focus On Teaching Instead Of Punishment

When distractions are good

All that being said, there is a case for arguing that distractions can be beneficial. For example, there’s evidence to suggest that mental distractions can aid in pain relief, especially for sufferers of chronic pain. They may also provide short-term relief for anxiety and distress.

In addition, pulling yourself away from a task can give your brain some much-needed time to decompress and refocus. There’s a reason we tend to come up with our best ideas when we’re bored or otherwise unoccupied; the brain has more freedom and leisure to wander to new places and tinker with problems that exist in the background.

If you’re specifically using a distraction to help your brain refocus (and possibly de-stress for a moment), you can actually get some value from your distractions.

Despite some potential benefits (when your distractions are fully under your control), though, for the most part, distractions are damaging your productivity – and in multiple ways.

If you want to improve your overall output and de-stress in the meantime, your best option is to limit your distractions by turning off notifications, scheduling your breaks, staying more disciplined with sites and apps likely to steal your attention and communicating to your coworkers about your need to focus throughout the day.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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Work Life Balance

Are You A Procrastinator? Don’t Be By Doing These 3 Things

Take control of your time and super-charge your day, making the most of your most valuable resource: Time.

Erik Kruger

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The more time I spend thinking, writing and coaching about how to combat procrastination, the more I realise how much bigger this problem is than I initially thought. Every person reading this column will at some point have fallen victim to this avoidance behaviour. In fact, many of us fall prey to it daily.

If you’re serious about personal and business success, overcoming procrastination should be top of mind. If you’re able to master the ability to not procrastinate, you’ll supercharge your productivity and performance without the need for any new tools, techniques or information.

By simply doing what you are supposed to do, you become more effective. The most powerful truths are often the simplest ones too. Let’s look at three ideas that will help you create momentum.

One: Know Your Style

Did you know there are six procrastination styles? Thanks to the work of Sapadin and Maguire we have identified certain ‘archetypes’ that we can use to relate to procrastination styles. Going through the list is an interesting exercise for raising awareness. It won’t ‘cure’ procrastination but it gives you an interesting starting point for further exploration.

Related: Why Your Procrastination Excuses Don’t Cut It

  • The Perfectionist does not start or finish in case it is not perfect in the eyes of others or self. Typical for creatives and entrepreneurs.
  • The Dreamer wants life to be smooth. They love to dream big without translating it into action. If their dreams never become reality, then they can never fail.
  • The Worrier is always wondering “what if something goes wrong?” They get caught up in their heads and over-analyse the situation.
  • The Defier is resistant to the instruction of others because they do not want to be told what to do. They procrastinate not because of the task at hand but because of their relationship with the task giver.
  • The Crisis Maker likes living on the edge. They feel that the added pressure of a looming deadline makes them work better.
  • The Over-doer takes on too much without establishing priorities and boundaries. They ultimately realise that they are overcommitted and start losing their grasp on the task.

Two: Time Immersion (TI)

I am currently completing my Master’s degree in Coaching. There have been times when I have found it incredibly difficult to motivate myself to do the work. One effective method that has helped me to progress is to focus on ‘time spent immersed’ instead of focusing on a specific outcome.

Instead of committing to a specific number of words or chapters I commit to just sitting down with the work for a specific amount of time. In my case, 45 minutes. This means that for those 45 minutes I immerse myself in the work. Reading a bit here, writing a bit there, and at the end of the 45 minutes I get up to take a break.

Time Immersion has two very important benefits. Firstly, we often procrastinate because a task is hard, and we don’t want to deal with the pain that comes with working on it. By committing to time immersed, hard things become easier. More importantly, they become easier without the judgement of whether you succeeded or failed. Secondly, it creates momentum. With every 45-minute TI session you will find yourself slowly chipping away at the frustration. We all know what happens when you chip away at a big problem with enough perseverance; it will be conquered.

Three: Let go of judgement

Those who procrastinate are not lazy. This is important to understand. True procrastination is a psychological phenomenon driven by our fear of failure, judgement and low frustration tolerance.

This is why procrastinators will often find other ways of keeping themselves occupied. Again, an avoidance behaviour, not just laziness.

If you identified your procrastination style, then this might have already given you some insight into why you do what you do. Knowing this, you can go beyond and examine the beliefs that you have that maintain your procrastinating behaviours.

Related: 4 Cures for Chronic Procrastination

One way to do this is to listen to your inner dialogue. That voice inside your head that loves to pull you down with negativity. Simply listen to the words that ‘he/she’ is using and then make a concerted effort to examine them. This is exactly what a coach would do.

If your inner voice says that you first need more information before proceeding with a task, stop, and ask yourself if that is really the truth.

If your inner voice says that you are a failure and that completing this task will expose you for the fraud you are, stop, and ask yourself if that is really true.

Usually, these irrational beliefs are easily refuted.

Final thoughts

The truth is that you already know enough. You know what to do. You know how to do it. The thing stopping you is your relationship with yourself and the task at hand. You will find the key to overcoming procrastination inside yourself. Spend some time exploring the ideas that I suggested and see your productivity explode.

 

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Work Life Balance

How To Quit Your Job The Right Way

Got a job you hate? You can still use it to get a job you love.

Nick Chasinov

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Every job, from summers spent lifeguarding or sweeping up popcorn to your first real desk job, has led you to where you are today. Without building relationships at each of those workplaces, you wouldn’t have developed the skills or network to help you move on to a better position. But you left those jobs for a reason – and you’re better off for it.

The Faas Foundation and Mental Health America’s Workplace Healthy Survey agrees. Results showed that employees who spoke poorly about their workplaces were more likely to have less healthy work environments, especially in terms of rewards and support from leadership. But even if you don’t love the day-to-day experience, the key to leaving your job the right way is to move on with the right attitude.

Moving on from a less-than-stellar workplace without burning any bridges is the surest way to build a solid career. But you have to know how to handle yourself. Here’s how to make the connections you need in order to create the future you want.

Related: 9 Reasons To Quit Your Job As Soon As You Can

1. Give 100 percent through your last day

If you want to start your own company, don’t quit your day job until you’ve built the foundation you need. Set a number or a financial milestone that will serve as your sign to jump ship and make your side hustle your full-time endeavour. It’s not unusual to see an entrepreneur quit a job and regret it soon after. Maintaining a regular job lets you keep benefits you might not be considering – think networking opportunities, a steady income and health insurance, to name just a few.

Want to see this in action? Look no further than Jeff Bezos’ experience at hedge fund D.E. Shaw. Bezos started there during the company’s early years, and he quickly rose to the position of vice president. Part of his job was to research internet-based business opportunities – and there, the entrepreneurial bug bit. Bezos started building Amazon from the ground up, and his D.E. Shaw connections were critical. He reached out to programmers associated with one of the company’s partners, and from there, he was able to hire his first employee. His good work and experience at D.E. Shaw helped him seal that deal.

2. Cultivate lasting relationships

Each experience you have is pushing you toward your ultimate goal, regardless of whether that seems true in the moment. The relationships you create with colleagues, bosses and subordinates can be the big break you need.

The connections I had built paved the way for me to move on and move up. In the early days of my company, for example, some of my prospective clients were very well-known brands. These brands had never heard of me, but my former colleagues were always available to serve as references, validating my credentials and helping me solidify new contracts.

Lead by example. When it’s time to sell your services, your colleagues will remember the skills and leadership you have shown over the years and will back you up with confidence.

Related: 10 Things You Must Do Before Quitting Your Job To Start Your Company

3. Let your peers know you appreciate them

You can’t expect colleagues to stick their necks out for you if you don’t put yourself out there for them, too. Make your colleagues look good; your professional relationships should be beneficial for all parties involved. Position your co-workers as rock stars, and make sure your praise reaches the boss’s ears.

In addition to creating stronger relationships, creating a culture of peer-to-peer praise can benefit companies as well. At JetBlue, employees are encouraged to submit positive reviews of their co-workers to a companywide program that rewards individuals for great performance. Those recognised receive points to either save up toward larger rewards or spend right away. Data from JetBlue shows that as more employees report being recognised, employee retention and engagement also increase. It’s a win-win.

Not every job is a dream job, but every job can help lead you to the career you want. The key is to focus on creating warm relationships with your co-workers and higher-ups, not on lighting a match to burn a bridge on your way out. Follow these three tips to make sure that the job you have now is priming you for your journey to the top.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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