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Avoid A Fatal Flaw Made By Many Presenters

Ever heard the phrase ‘Money is the root of all evil?’ It’s so often used that it’s become a part of our everyday language. And yet, did you know that it’s a misquote?

Douglas Kruger

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AvoidFatalFlaw

The original line, to be found in scripture, is ‘The love of money is the root of all evil.’ Now that’s not quite the same thing, is it?

In the world of public speaking and presenting, there’s another little idiom that once expressed a very useful idea, but has been corrupted by overuse to become something rather destructive.The phrase is flippantly tossed as a morsel of comfort to anyone who is about to deliver an important presentation and who expresses nerves or apprehension.And it is this: “Just be yourself.”

At face value, this is excellent advice.You should come across as warm, real and authentic. You should put a great deal of effort into portraying a genuine, grounded human being and not some über presenter, a la the ‘Yes!’ speakers of yester year.

However, here’s the danger. The sentiment ‘just be yourself,’ is often taken to mean, ‘just get up there and wing it. ’Which is not the same thing at all.

Your credibility is enhanced by being natural and authentic. It is destroyed by being unprepared.

In reality, it takes a boat load of hards log to just be yourself effectively, and you should never just wing it. So how do you marry these two ideas: preparing well, but coming across naturally?

Preparing well means:

  • Writing your thoughts out (you may choose to do this line by line, or in a mind-map diagram form)
  • Editing out anything unnecessary to your main point
  • Doing a number of dry runs, so that you become comfortable with both the content and the links between the sections
  • Preparing all the logistics (room, laptop, projector, slides, etc) well in advance.

Being natural means:

  • Not changing your voice-tone. Many amateur presenters unconsciously put on a dramatic voice that they would never use in their day-to-day lives.
  • Not trying to come across as too ‘strong.’ Be friendly and sincere.
  • Using a stop-start rhythm, rather than trying to deliver a ballet. A ballet performance flows from one end to the other regardless of audience reaction. Good presenting is different. You should deliver a line and allow the audience a moment to ‘digest’ it. Then you discuss something humorous and allow the audience to react. Such a stop-start rhythm ensures that your presentation looks real and spontaneous – like a two way chat – and not like a canned rehearsal.

So no, money is not the root of all evil. It’s the love that ‘s the problem. And yes, you should be yourself. But never forget that it takes a great deal of practice and concentration to be the best version of yourself that you have to offer.

Douglas Kruger is the only speaker in Africa to have won the Southern African Championships for Public Speaking a record five times. He is the author of ‘50 Ways to Become a Better Speaker,’ published in South Africa and Nigeria, ‘50 Ways to Position Yourself as an Expert,’ and co-author of ‘So You’re in Charge. Now What? 52 Ways to Become a Better Leader.’ See Douglas in action, or read his articles, at www.douglaskruger.co.za. Email him at Kruger@compute.co.za, or connect with him on Linked In or Twitter: @DouglasKruger

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(Video) Get More Attention For your Business

Lindsay Broder, The Occupreneur Coach, explains the importance of communicating your unique skills and the value you can offer clients in this short video.

Entrepreneur

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Demonstrating what you bring to the table isn’t always easy.

Lindsay Broder, The Occupreneur Coach, explains the importance of communicating your unique skills and the value you can offer clients in this short video.

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(Video) How You Can Make Your Next Presentation Memorable

How to make your pitch memorable.

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From delivering board room presentations to speaking before a live audience, speaking publicly is something most of us will have to do at some point. But if we’re going to take the time to develop and practice delivering a presentation, we want to make sure the content and the “performance” are memorable, right?

In this video, keynote speaker and communication coach Carmine Gallo offers his top tips for how you can make your next business presentation one your audience won’t soon forget. Gallo is author of TALK LIKE TED: The 9 Public Speaking Secrets of The World’s Top Minds.

Gallo recommends following the “rule of three.” Instead of presenting 15 or 20 points, stick with three or four features or pieces of advice. Why? It’s easier for people to remember and stay engaged with what you’re saying.

“It’s almost impossible for the human brain to ignore that group of three,” Gallo says. “We have to know what those three are.”

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(Video) How to Hit the Presentation Content Nail on the Head

Building better business presentations.

Entrepreneur

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Avoid the glassy-eyed look from your audience by creating a strong presentation that delivers an exciting experience. Pam Slim delves into her process and techniques for choosing content to fill her presentation slides.

“Ask yourself: What do you want people to walk away with?”

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