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Get to the Point

How to write the perfect sales letter.

Danielle Kennedy

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GetToThePoint

Each time you sit down to write, clearly define the purpose of your sales letter, brochure or ad before putting anything on paper.

Get clarity first. Be able to answer these two questions:

  1. What is the purpose of this communication?
  2. What compelling words can I use to best get the reader’s attention?

Now start writing. Don’t stop to evaluate your first draft. People who tell me they can’t write well are usually people who stop and think too much. Just get it on paper. Here’s an excerpt from a sales letter with one purpose: to sell a particular product from a product line and to prove its value. The letter generated an income of more than R7 000 per month for a six-month period. The letter started out this way: “It’s a system I know you can use, and it has an iron-clad, money-back guarantee. So the only question is, Do you want to add to your income this year? (More about that later.)” The “More about that later” piques a reader’s curiosity and keeps him or her reading. The letter continued:

“The most important product we sell is ourselves. It is a fact that people do not do business with people they do not trust. That’s why the first part of my course is a comprehensive study about authentically earning the prospect’s trust.” The letter goes on to detail how the product accomplishes that goal. All good sales letters ask for the order many times throughout the body of the letter, especially at the end. This one continued: “You take NO RISK with my you-be-the-judge FREE-TRIAL OFFERING. I want you to order it now – and to make sure you don’t procrastinate, this offer is only good for a limited time.” Strong sales letters are specific about how the order can be accomplished now. Write in the present tense. Avoid the passive.

In closing. Some people like ending a sales letter with a P.S. Sometimes they hand write the postscript. Here’s the one used on the above letter: “P.S. Do not treat this offering like another sales pitch. I know with certainty this is going to help you. If you were my best friend, I would tell you not to pass up this offer. Some day you will thank me, so ORDER NOW.”

Danielle Kennedy is a speaker who will not let you down. When it comes to both business and life experiences, she has walked the talk. Her presentation is dynamic, entertaining, and story-driven. But her stories and experiences are interlaced with facts, valuable lessons and insights that will dramatically increase your company’s bottom line and improve individual outlooks and attitudes.

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How to make your pitch memorable.

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From delivering board room presentations to speaking before a live audience, speaking publicly is something most of us will have to do at some point. But if we’re going to take the time to develop and practice delivering a presentation, we want to make sure the content and the “performance” are memorable, right?

In this video, keynote speaker and communication coach Carmine Gallo offers his top tips for how you can make your next business presentation one your audience won’t soon forget. Gallo is author of TALK LIKE TED: The 9 Public Speaking Secrets of The World’s Top Minds.

Gallo recommends following the “rule of three.” Instead of presenting 15 or 20 points, stick with three or four features or pieces of advice. Why? It’s easier for people to remember and stay engaged with what you’re saying.

“It’s almost impossible for the human brain to ignore that group of three,” Gallo says. “We have to know what those three are.”

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(Video) How to Hit the Presentation Content Nail on the Head

Building better business presentations.

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Avoid the glassy-eyed look from your audience by creating a strong presentation that delivers an exciting experience. Pam Slim delves into her process and techniques for choosing content to fill her presentation slides.

“Ask yourself: What do you want people to walk away with?”

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