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Keep Your Mouth Shut

You don’t close sales by being a blabbermouth.

Kim Gordon

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KeepYourMouthShut

Did you know that in the most successful meetings, the prospects do most of the talking? Your primary job is to simply ask the right questions, listen carefully to the answers and propose reasonable solutions.

There are two types of questions: closed and open-ended.

Closed questions are good conversation starters and can be answered with “yes”, “no” or a short answer. Open-ended questions, such as “What do you like best about your present research firm?”, help you uncover emotions and feelings. You establish a dialogue using closed questions and draw out your prospects using open-ended questions. In this way, you can uncover their needs and fulfil them.

If you encounter objections, you can use what I call “just suppose” questions to help prospects respond affirmatively. For example, a prospect tells you she doesn’t like using multiple research firms, one for field research and another for online surveys. You can say: “Just suppose you could obtain quality field services and all the online and telephone research you need under one roof. You’d like that, wouldn’t you?” She’s bound to say yes. When you first speak to a prospect on thephone, be prepared with a list of questions designed to uncover his or her needs. This will give you the basic information necessary to prepare a short presentation for your meeting. Structure it to foster interaction throughout. Also, schedule sufficient time after your presentation to ask more questions, gauge how your ideas were received and use what you learn to propose additional solutions. Closing requires moving prospects to the next level of commitment. Once you’ve helped them see the benefits of hiring your firm, they’ll be anxious to get started, and you’ll have to do very little work to close. State what action you plan to take and be sure to follow through.

Kim T. Gordon is one of the country's leading experts on the small-business market. Over the past 30 years as an author, marketing expert, media spokesperson, speaker and coach, her work has helped millions of small-business owners increase their success.

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(Video) Get More Attention For your Business

Lindsay Broder, The Occupreneur Coach, explains the importance of communicating your unique skills and the value you can offer clients in this short video.

Entrepreneur

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Demonstrating what you bring to the table isn’t always easy.

Lindsay Broder, The Occupreneur Coach, explains the importance of communicating your unique skills and the value you can offer clients in this short video.

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(Video) How You Can Make Your Next Presentation Memorable

How to make your pitch memorable.

Entrepreneur

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Carmine-Gallo

From delivering board room presentations to speaking before a live audience, speaking publicly is something most of us will have to do at some point. But if we’re going to take the time to develop and practice delivering a presentation, we want to make sure the content and the “performance” are memorable, right?

In this video, keynote speaker and communication coach Carmine Gallo offers his top tips for how you can make your next business presentation one your audience won’t soon forget. Gallo is author of TALK LIKE TED: The 9 Public Speaking Secrets of The World’s Top Minds.

Gallo recommends following the “rule of three.” Instead of presenting 15 or 20 points, stick with three or four features or pieces of advice. Why? It’s easier for people to remember and stay engaged with what you’re saying.

“It’s almost impossible for the human brain to ignore that group of three,” Gallo says. “We have to know what those three are.”

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(Video) How to Hit the Presentation Content Nail on the Head

Building better business presentations.

Entrepreneur

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Avoid the glassy-eyed look from your audience by creating a strong presentation that delivers an exciting experience. Pam Slim delves into her process and techniques for choosing content to fill her presentation slides.

“Ask yourself: What do you want people to walk away with?”

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