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Let Your Sales Kit Shine

If prospects think you’re just like everyone else, let your sales kit prove otherwise.

John Jantsch

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LetSalesKitShine

No one likes to be sold, but everyone likes to buy. Your marketing materials should be designed in a way that guides your prospects logically along a path from education and trust to wanting to build a relationship.

At first, your prospects believe your firm is pretty much like any other firm that does what you do. And just looking at the surface, they’re right. If you’re an electrical contractor, your employees probably wire a ceiling fan the same way other electricians do. The difference, though, is the level of service, professionalism and communication you provide – and of course, your 27-point safety checklist and personal story. That’s the stuff they need to hear, the stuff that makes them say, “This is someone I can trust to come into my home, someone I want to refer to a friend.”

Don’t turn your prospects off from the beginning with the typical sales copy. Your sales materials should function more as informational products than as product manuals. A sales kit is an effective tool to help educate prospects about your business. If properly constructed, your sales kit will make your firm the obvious choice when prospects compare it to other businesses that do what you do.

Your sales kit should include some combination of the following information:

1. Your “difference” page. Use this page to explain how your firm is truly different from your competition and designed to meet a very specific need in a very specific way. In this section, don’t worry about telling your prospects what your firm does; focus on how you do it in a valuable or unique way.

2. A list of services. Here, tell prospects what you do or offer. You may even need to create a separate sheet for each of your services or service areas.

3. Case studies. Pick representative clients or industries and outline how your product or service solved their challenge. Case studies allow your prospects to see how they, too, can find relief.

4. Process description. Show prospects how you do what you do. Create detailed checklists and flow charts that show how you keep your promises. Many people  underestimate how much goes into delivering a quality product or service.

5. Your story. Many companies have interesting – and even gut-wrenching – histories. Tell your story in an open, honest and entertaining way, and you’ll win their hearts as well as their heads.

6. Extras. You can also add testimonial letters, FAQ pages, copies of articles you’ve written, and reprints of any media coverage your firm has received.

The individual pieces of your sales kit can, in many cases, consist of word-processed files that are laser-printed onto a template and tucked in a pocket folder for delivery. This format allows for inexpensive printing and a great deal of flexibility when you need to change or update your sales and marketing materials. This format makes for great web content as well.

But will prospects even read all this stuff? As with all sales and marketing efforts, some people will read it and some won’t, but the ones who do won’t hesitate to pay a premium to acquire the services of such an obvious expert.

Tactics for Instant Credibility. Watch the Video Here

John Jantsch is a veteran marketing coach, award-winning blogger and author of Duct Tape Marketing: The World's Most Practical Small Business Marketing Guide.

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(Video) Get More Attention For your Business

Lindsay Broder, The Occupreneur Coach, explains the importance of communicating your unique skills and the value you can offer clients in this short video.

Entrepreneur

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Demonstrating what you bring to the table isn’t always easy.

Lindsay Broder, The Occupreneur Coach, explains the importance of communicating your unique skills and the value you can offer clients in this short video.

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(Video) How You Can Make Your Next Presentation Memorable

How to make your pitch memorable.

Entrepreneur

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Carmine-Gallo

From delivering board room presentations to speaking before a live audience, speaking publicly is something most of us will have to do at some point. But if we’re going to take the time to develop and practice delivering a presentation, we want to make sure the content and the “performance” are memorable, right?

In this video, keynote speaker and communication coach Carmine Gallo offers his top tips for how you can make your next business presentation one your audience won’t soon forget. Gallo is author of TALK LIKE TED: The 9 Public Speaking Secrets of The World’s Top Minds.

Gallo recommends following the “rule of three.” Instead of presenting 15 or 20 points, stick with three or four features or pieces of advice. Why? It’s easier for people to remember and stay engaged with what you’re saying.

“It’s almost impossible for the human brain to ignore that group of three,” Gallo says. “We have to know what those three are.”

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(Video) How to Hit the Presentation Content Nail on the Head

Building better business presentations.

Entrepreneur

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Avoid the glassy-eyed look from your audience by creating a strong presentation that delivers an exciting experience. Pam Slim delves into her process and techniques for choosing content to fill her presentation slides.

“Ask yourself: What do you want people to walk away with?”

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