Connect with us

Presenting

Say Less, Sell More

Make every word you say count by becoming a better listener.

Barry Farber

Published

on

SayLessSellMore

One of the best baseball coaches I’ve seen in a long time has the amazing ability to get every kid on his team to stop in their tracks and listen to what he has to say. I figured out why: Every time he says something, it’s a valuable lesson, a critical point. It also might be because he played pro ball for nine years. But what it really comes down to is his knowledge of and passion for the game – and only opening his mouth when he has something important to share. After a while, people start to listen to these types of people. Ever notice how some people are very quiet, but when they talk, people really listen? It’s because they usually possess these two qualities:

  • They have an uncanny ability to turn the conversation back over to the other person. Often, prospects and customers will ask you questions that you would love to be able to answer in a way that shows them how much you know about your business. But next time, think about the question the person is asking. For example: Prospect: “What programmes can you offer us?” (At this point, some salespeople will go through their entire presentation and product line.) Sales Rep: “We have a variety of programmes that are designed specifically for your industry, but before I take you through some of them, could you please tell me what you want to accomplish with them and who the audience would be?” I’m sure you can provide them with a more detailed description before you turn the question back over to them, but the point here is that you want the other person to talk about their goals and what they’re trying to do. Even if it’s not a product-related question, by turning the conversation around so that the other person does the talking, you’ll build a stronger relationship, be able to understand their buying criteria, communicate a better solution and generally make the prospect feel at ease because you’re really listening to them and showing that you care.
  • They don’t need to talk to be in control. They have what someone once described to me as quiet confidence. They look like they are powerful and knowledgeable without saying a word. Have you ever watched someone who feels like they have to tell everyone they meet who they are and what they’ve accomplished? I don’t have to tell you what most people think of that person. If you are as good as you say you are, your actions and understanding will back you up later on. Good salespeople know that asking the right questions and really listening to the answers are what keep them in control of the conversation and make them appear to be an expert.

This morning, I introduced two companies toeach other that could mutually benefit from the other’s services. I ended up being the mediator to keep both parties on track and prevent them from talking too much about what they do. And boy, do people like to talk about what they do. Why? Because customers want to know how they are going to benefit from the relationships they build. Once we realise that understanding others’ needs and goals means turning the conversation around and not talking, we end up strengthening our selling position and closing more deals – not to mention learning a few things along the way.

Barry Farber is a top speaker and bestselling author of 11 books on sales, management and personal achievement.

Presenting

(Video) Get More Attention For your Business

Lindsay Broder, The Occupreneur Coach, explains the importance of communicating your unique skills and the value you can offer clients in this short video.

Entrepreneur

Published

on

Get-More-Attention-For-your-Business_Video_Presenting

Demonstrating what you bring to the table isn’t always easy.

Lindsay Broder, The Occupreneur Coach, explains the importance of communicating your unique skills and the value you can offer clients in this short video.

Related:

 

Continue Reading

Presenting

(Video) How You Can Make Your Next Presentation Memorable

How to make your pitch memorable.

Entrepreneur

Published

on

Carmine-Gallo

From delivering board room presentations to speaking before a live audience, speaking publicly is something most of us will have to do at some point. But if we’re going to take the time to develop and practice delivering a presentation, we want to make sure the content and the “performance” are memorable, right?

In this video, keynote speaker and communication coach Carmine Gallo offers his top tips for how you can make your next business presentation one your audience won’t soon forget. Gallo is author of TALK LIKE TED: The 9 Public Speaking Secrets of The World’s Top Minds.

Gallo recommends following the “rule of three.” Instead of presenting 15 or 20 points, stick with three or four features or pieces of advice. Why? It’s easier for people to remember and stay engaged with what you’re saying.

“It’s almost impossible for the human brain to ignore that group of three,” Gallo says. “We have to know what those three are.”

Continue Reading

Presenting

(Video) How to Hit the Presentation Content Nail on the Head

Building better business presentations.

Entrepreneur

Published

on

How-to-hit-the-content-nail-on-the-head-for-presentations_Video_presenting_sales

Avoid the glassy-eyed look from your audience by creating a strong presentation that delivers an exciting experience. Pam Slim delves into her process and techniques for choosing content to fill her presentation slides.

“Ask yourself: What do you want people to walk away with?”

Related:

Continue Reading
Advertisement

SPOTLIGHT

Advertisement

Recent Posts

Follow Us

Entrepreneur-Newsletters
*
We respect your privacy. 
* indicates required.
Advertisement

Trending