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(Video) How You Can Make Your Next Presentation Memorable

How to make your pitch memorable.

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Carmine-Gallo

From delivering board room presentations to speaking before a live audience, speaking publicly is something most of us will have to do at some point. But if we’re going to take the time to develop and practice delivering a presentation, we want to make sure the content and the “performance” are memorable, right?

In this video, keynote speaker and communication coach Carmine Gallo offers his top tips for how you can make your next business presentation one your audience won’t soon forget. Gallo is author of TALK LIKE TED: The 9 Public Speaking Secrets of The World’s Top Minds.

Gallo recommends following the “rule of three.” Instead of presenting 15 or 20 points, stick with three or four features or pieces of advice. Why? It’s easier for people to remember and stay engaged with what you’re saying.

“It’s almost impossible for the human brain to ignore that group of three,” Gallo says. “We have to know what those three are.”

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(Video) Get More Attention For your Business

Lindsay Broder, The Occupreneur Coach, explains the importance of communicating your unique skills and the value you can offer clients in this short video.

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Demonstrating what you bring to the table isn’t always easy.

Lindsay Broder, The Occupreneur Coach, explains the importance of communicating your unique skills and the value you can offer clients in this short video.

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(Video) How to Hit the Presentation Content Nail on the Head

Building better business presentations.

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Avoid the glassy-eyed look from your audience by creating a strong presentation that delivers an exciting experience. Pam Slim delves into her process and techniques for choosing content to fill her presentation slides.

“Ask yourself: What do you want people to walk away with?”

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Five Strategies For A Winning Sales Presentation

Closing that deal starts with the perfect sales pitch.

Lisa Girard

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We’ve all seen it — people listening to a sales presentation, eyes glazed over and their minds anywhere but on what the speaker is saying. As an entrepreneur, whether you’re selling yourself or your products and services, it’s critical to avoid the missteps that put prospects to sleep and kill the deal.

Here are five must-follow rules to win over prospects and seal the deal.

1. Listen before pitching

One of the mistakes business owners make is talking too much about the wonders of their company, instead of asking questions and listening to a potential customer’s needs.

Your prospect probably did some research about you beforehand anyway, so don’t waste precious minutes going on about your qualifications. Nothing is more annoying than when someone is pitching you, and it’s all about them and their products.

Instead, open your presentation with a question like, “I’m prepared to discuss our solution for you, but has anything changed since we last spoke?” or “Is there anything else I need to know before diving into a solution?”

Before long, the customer will give you the key to how you can win the deal. You just need to ask enough questions and then shut up.

2. Put in more prep time

No matter how good you are at thinking on your feet, don’t wing the presentation. You’ll risk jumping all over the place without a logical flow. Take the time to prepare and to practice from an outline, making sure your presentation covers all your points clearly and concisely.

Always review a prospect’s website to learn about what it sells, how it makes money, and how you might be able to fix its problems.

Check for any mutual connections on LinkedIn.Then give them a call or shoot them an email asking more about the prospect’s personality and what you could say that would make the meeting successful.

Sometimes people will give you a heads up on how you should approach the prospect, and it can be invaluable.

3. Liven it up

Many professionals don’t realise just how boring their presentations are — too many facts, a flat monotone, tired stories. Sometimes professionals have been giving the same presentation for so long they just slip into autopilot. In today’s competitive market, your presentations must be entertaining in order to obtain and maintain the attention of prospects.

Be creative and put some energy behind your presentation. Practice with a tape recorder to determine if your presentation falters and make improvements.

The tone you use and your vocal variation allow you to project your own personality and to create a positive response whether you’re speaking to one person or a large group of people.

4. Don’t use visual aids as a crutch

If brochures, handouts or slides could sell a product or service on their own, companies would not need sales people. Depending too much on visual aids can give you a false sense of security.

We tend to think it isn’t necessary to prepare thoroughly because our props will lead us right through the presentation. We let the visual aid become the star and virtually run the show. Instead, keep visual aids as a nice addition to what you’re saying.

Place visual aids in your presentation strategically to highlight major points, but remember that your style and personality will have much more impact. Most important, ask yourself whether a visual aid is for you or for them? If it’s for you to get you through your presentation, scrap it. If it’s for them so they can visually understand your presentation, keep it.

5. Be ready to take the next step

Not every presentation is going to end with a sale, so it’s up to you to establish the next step in the process. Don’t conclude a meeting with a “we hope to talk again soon” mentality.

The executives you speak with are probably incredibly busy. You need to determine next steps right then and there — before life gets in the way. Be ready to schedule a subsequent meeting or follow-up phone call, which will show you’re serious about working together. You may not have the sale yet, but you at least have something set up so things can continue to move forward.

Creative Alternatives to Using PowerPoint

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