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5 Tips For Delivering Effective Business Presentations

Here are five practical tips to keep in mind the next time you present to a client.

Kelvin Reynolds

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Getting your foot in a prospective client’s door is an achievement on its own – but the presentation you’ll be delivering to them during that meeting is what will help you to win their business.

Typically, there is a limited amount of time to ‘sell yourself’ and convince the client to choose you, which is why your approach to preparing and delivering presentations is so important.

1Know your audience

Every client is different and it’s important to have at least a general idea of the type of person (or people) you will be dealing with.

Related: Tips for Kickass Business Presentations

Use social media to find out more about a client’s personality, or consult with other professionals in your network or within the industry who have experience with presenting to this particular client.

This will help you gain helpful insight, such as specific phrases that may set this specific client on edge, and general pointers on what to expect from them.

2Keep it simple

The ideal presentation conveys your point succinctly, holding the client’s attention through to the very last word. If you plan on using a slide presentation, try to include more images than text, and as a rule of thumb, explain only one idea per slide.

Keep in mind that too many complicated graphs, spreadsheets and tiny numbers are difficult to see and understand at a glance, so avoid these, and rather explain your thoughts.

3Show confidence

confident-sales-presentation

While it’s important to carefully consider the content of a presentation, how you deliver that information is key to your success.

Do not rely on the presentation to guide you, but rather use it as an aid to your delivery.

Ensure that you make eye contact with your audience, and use hand movements to articulate your thoughts – distracting the audience from your clicker tool as you seamlessly switch from slide to slide. 

Related: 3 Simple and Creative Alternatives to Using PowerPoint for Presentations

4Believe in your product/service

There’s nothing more obvious to an audience than a lack of belief – the client will be able to hear it in your voice and see it in your face, which means you run the risk of not being taken seriously.

Avoid this by taking the time to understand your product or service and most importantly, the benefits it offers your client. It is also vital to ensure that, if someone else in the company is presenting to the client, they understand the value of your offerings and are just as passionate about it as you would be.

5Prepare for the worst

As negative as it may seem, it helps to consider every potential disaster or undesirable outcome in order to prevent it from happening to you at the most inopportune moment.

Technology – wonderful as it is – sometimes fails us, so make sure you’ve printed out a few sets of the presentation slides or any supporting information to hand out should the gremlins get the better of you.

Be sure to print them out in high-res colour for effect, using a high quality printer and good paper. 

Kelvin is a seasoned and experienced business manager and business leader. He has held a number of Board Level positions in leading technology companies and has a wealth of experience in Channel and Distribution. In 2010,after a period in the aviation industry, Kelvin made a return to mainstream IT and heads up Epson's business interests in South and Southern Africa. Kelvin has sucessfully restructured and energised the local team and setting about restoring Epson's rightful market share in the region.

Techniques

How You Can Guarantee Customer Satisfaction

Customer service is no longer a differentiator. Every business makes the same promises, and everyone says that they put their customers first. But do you? Here are three ways to up your customer-centric game.

Basil O’Hagan

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“We implemented a money-back guarantee at the Brazen Head at the Leaping Frog Centre, Fourways, offering a money-back guarantee on all our meals. Staff were reluctant at first, but the guarantee forced us to maintain standards at our front and back of house. In the end, we only had to honour the guarantee once in eight months.”

It’s a stock standard differentiator that every company uses: Customer service. And yet so many businesses are anything but customer-centric. Whether you’re in a B2C or B2B environment, here are three areas you could improve today.

1. Guarantee Your Service

If you don’t believe in your service, you can’t expect anyone else to. So, guarantee your service. This should not just be an empty phrase — back up your guarantee with a money-back promise.

Advertise that promise in your business, on your website and in your communications. That tells your customers, “We have such confidence in our service, and we’re so determined to be great that we put our money where our mouth is.”

Related: 5 Techniques To Leave Customers Grinning And Vowing To Return

The benefits of a money-back guarantee:

  • It encourages first-time customers to try your services.
  • It forces your team to keep standards high and focus on results, as slip-ups will hurt your business immediately.
  • It fosters pride in your business. “Our service is 100% guaranteed to be great!”
  • It is a selling point. “At Venus Video Games, satisfaction is guaranteed, or your money back!”
  • It sets you apart from your competitors. Would you rather try a new store that offers a money-back guarantee, or one that doesn’t?

We implemented this at the Brazen Head at the Leaping Frog Centre, Fourways, offering a money-back guarantee on all our meals. Staff were reluctant at first, but the guarantee forced us to maintain standards at our front and back of house. In the end, we only had to honour the guarantee once in eight months.

2. Complaints: Relate and Recover

Often, what a customer wants most from a company is to be treated like a person. They want real, authentic, human interaction.

Mostly, this human kindness will come while you cater perfectly to their every need, deliver the goods and services efficiently and then send them on their way with a massive smile on their face.

But every now and then things will go wrong. The customer won’t get exactly what they were looking for, the service won’t be 100%, or there will be some kind of misunderstanding.

This is unfortunate and of course nobody wants it to happen, but occasionally it does. If handled properly, these hiccups can be an opportunity to improve customer relations, build real human interaction and turn an unhappy customer into a happy one.

When a customer calls into your bank branch to complain that an unauthorised debit order was taken off her account, treat the person like you would like to be treated. Here is a good procedure to follow that fixes the problem while building a real human interaction.

  1. Understand the problem. Listen carefully and make sure you know exactly what the client’s complaint is.
  2. It doesn’t matter if they actually signed an authorisation and it’s technically their fault. This isn’t about who’s right and who’s wrong. It’s about building a relationship of good customer service.
  3. Take immediate action to fix the problem. In this case, reverse the debit order.
  4. Ensure it doesn’t happen again. That means working out who authorised the debit, and why and adjusting your systems.

If you go through this process as efficiently and as pleasantly as you can, you might find the customer comes out the other side in a pretty good mood. Their complaint has been acknowledged, they’ve got an apology and it’s been sorted out.

Service Tip: Don’t take customer complaints personally. They are part of your job, and your role is to handle them professionally. When a passenger of your airline says, “You’ve lost my bag!” they don’t mean it was you personally who lost it. But in this case, you represent your airline, so you should take responsibility, apologise and sort it out.

Related: Demanding Customers Are The Ones Who Motivate Innovation

3. Use Your Own Services

There’s no better way to check what your company’s service is like than by being your own customer. Of course, if people recognise you as one of their colleagues, they’ll be on their best behaviour, so use one of your digital channels, phone up or use a branch where they don’t know you.

Now pretend you’re a customer looking to make a purchase, but without too much knowledge of your systems. You’re a person off the street, as it were. What is your service experience like?

Here are some ways you can use your own services:

  • Try to get hold of your company. How easy is it to find your details? Is your website clear and logical, is your phone number prominently displayed? How is the phone answered?
  • Try to make a purchase. Is it easy? Is your query handled efficiently and quickly?
    • Most importantly, what’s the service like? Are the staff friendly, positive and dynamic? Do they go the extra mile to deliver exceptional service? Do they build relationships, do they provide help beyond just making the sale?
  • Phone to complain. Use the customer-care line, or website. You’ve been advertising this channel for years — what actually happens when someone uses it? Are complaints handled efficiently and in a positive spirit?
  • Leave a message. You can do this by voicemail, text or email. Does anyone get back to you?
  • Be inconvenient. Call over the weekend, after-hours, during lunch, or even during a busy period. Are the staff just as keen to help you? Can you even get hold of anyone?

Try to get hold of yourself. When last did you listen to your own voice message? What does the signature say at the bottom of your email? What does your switchboard operator say when answering the phone?

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Techniques

How To Manufacture Sales Urgency (Without Sounding Like A Scam Artist)

If you’re struggling to drive urgency in your business, here are three ways to do it.

Sujan Patel

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We’ve all seen those infomercials – the ones that urge us to call in to buy a blender or a mop or some other kind of gadget. If we call in the next 20 minutes, we’ll receive two for the price of one. Somehow, against my better judgment, I find myself thinking about calling in to cash in on the deal. But why?

It’s because those infomercials are all about urgency. You can use the same tactic to drive sales to your business, too.

Establishing urgency gives your customers a reason to act quickly. Their instinct is to take their time and think about the decision. But by throwing urgency into the mix, you’re eliminating the customer’s ability to think too hard or wait too long to buy.

But creating that sense of urgency isn’t always easy. Research from Hubspot finds that establishing urgency is the top challenge today’s salespeople face. If you’re struggling to drive urgency in your business, here are three ways to do it.

1. Establish scarcity

The more there is of an item, the less motivated we are to go out and get it. But if that item is scarce (or perceived as scarce), its value increases.

Related: Sales Strategy Example

Think of the iPhone. How many people do you know who run out to get the newest iPhone on the day of its release? They stand in line for hours, wanting to be one of the first to have the new product, and knowing that eventually the store is going to run out of iPhones – at least until they get another shipment. But that won’t be for months.

That new model iPhone is perceived as scarce. There aren’t many of them, and time is running out to get one, so your purchase decision needs to be made quickly. The same idea can be applied to your products or services. Perhaps you only offer a limited number of products or you only open registration for your event for a limited time. With the window of opportunity much smaller, your prospects will be more likely to buy.

2. Focus on your customers’ needs

Establishing urgency doesn’t always have to be about scarcity, though. You can create a sense of urgency by understanding, from the customer’s point of view, why they need the product now. This goes back to understanding your customers’ needs, which you need to know to sell anything to them. You need to get to the bottom of what makes your customers tick and what their pain points are. Then you can focus on how your products or services offer a solution.

The customer is always asking “What’s in it for me?” When they hear how your product or service aligns with their needs, they are persuaded to act. To the customer, their problems are urgent, and if you offer a way to solve them, they’ll be more likely to trust you and buy from you.

Related: Empower Your Team To Make More Sales

3. Show the consequences

As humans, we tend to avoid negative consequences no matter what. This “loss aversion” means we’ll do whatever it takes to avoid dangerous situations, losing the things we love or any other negative consequence. In fact, the desire not to lose is often greater than the desire to gain.

In sales, focusing on the consequences of not buying can have a great effect on a prospect’s decision to buy. You may choose to show how much money the prospect could lose if they don’t invest in your product or service, or how flawed their current processes are and how inefficient their business is. Whatever it is, focusing on the negative instead of the positive will have a psychological influence on your prospects, which will lead them to a purchase decision faster.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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Techniques

How To Respond Effectively When Buyers Resort To These 5 Obnoxious Negotiating Tactics

Get over the shock, figure out what’s really going on and respond calmly.

Mike Schultz

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You’ve been working with a buyer for months. You’ve had multiple meetings, developed a great relationship, answered their objections and now, you’re hoping it will be smooth sailing as you look to close the sale. Then, you enter the sales negotiation stage.

Unfortunately, not all buyers come to negotiations in partner mode, wanting to work collaboratively with you. Instead, some buyers take a more positional approach. They either want to get the price reduced or get more from you for less. Some buyers will go to great lengths to get everything in their favour, and their tactics are more cringe worthy than others.

Here are five obnoxious buyer tactics and how you can respond.

1. Temper tantrum

You’ve been negotiating for a while and are stuck working through problems. You make an offer, and the buyer says, “Ok, this is crazy. That’s insulting. I’ve had enough of this!” They get up and slam the door.

Sometimes a temper tantrum is an orchestrated reaction to price or a specific term in the proposal in order to evoke a response from you.

If this happens to you, don’t get rattled. Remain professional, and don’t take the bait. Suggest taking a short break. You can help the buyer save face by acknowledging how important the negotiated issue is for everyone involved.

Then, use a white board and illustrate the key points, and get back to the objectives and possibilities. If their objection was just a price concession request, say no. When you do so, you set a boundary. Meanwhile, keep working on solutions and move on as if the temper tantrum didn’t happen.

Related: Small Business Savvy: Why You Need Negotiation Skills

2. Theatre of the absurd

Imagine you say, “For this solution set over a 12-month period, that will be $320,000.” The buyer’s response is, “I don’t think so. It should be $40,000 max.”

With this tactic, the buyer asks for a lot, knowing it’s absurd, hoping to then appear reasonable by lowering demands that are still, actually, unreasonable. In this situation, you need to reverse direction. Respond immediately, and call their bluff. They had a big reaction, you have one back. Say something like, “Let me ask you, if you were me, how would you react to that?” or “What do you suppose my VP will say if I even entertained this discussion?”. Reverse direction by giving them an example of why what they’re asking for is silly.

3. Selective memory

With this tactic, the buyer conveniently forgets what they agreed to. This is why you should keep and share notes after negotiation discussions. Make sure your documentation is good, and you can avoid the issue altogether.

If this occurs multiple times, call them out on it. Say something like, “We seem to keep backing away from things we’ve already agreed to. What can we do moving forward to ensure this doesn’t happen again?” Then bring the conversation back to objectives and possibilities.

4. Good cop, bad cop

good-cop-bad-cop

With this tactic, the buyer introduces a “bad cop” later in discussions to pressure price, change the agreement, reopen closed issues and so on. Your best response to this tactic is to bring your own bad cop to even the playing field.

Don’t blink or look intimidated. Most importantly, don’t cave. Stick to objectives, possibilities, requirements and alternatives, and focus on outcomes. Often times, buyers try to wear you down with time and pressure. Don’t cave. Make sure you stay present, and don’t rush.

Related: Why Thinking Abstractly Helps You Negotiate

5. One last thing

You’ve spent the last four months negotiating a major deal and are ready to sign the agreement. It’s close to your reservation price, but still manages to squeeze in above your BATNA (best alternative to a negotiated agreement).

The buyer sends you an email that reads, “Attached is the signed contract. There’s just one last thing we wrote into the contract and initialed – we need to put no money down, and not send the deposit as you noted. We’ll start paying in 120 days.”

“One last thing” is a tricky tactic. It catches the seller at their most vulnerable point and uses eagerness to get the deal done to wring out final concessions.

To address this tactic, you need to ask yourself whether the “one last thing” jeopardises the agreement. What problems does it introduce, if any? Are you willing to play what roughly equates to a game of chicken with a buyer? Ask questions and suggest a trade offer unless the ask is truly insignificant.

Sometimes, it’s not a game. Your buyer may be forced by company policy to say this, and may be stuck if you don’t agree.

In any case, you need to analyse the reasons, consequences and implications, then re-engage the discussion with the buyer. Remind them that the process to get final agreement includes flexibility on both sides.

As a seller, you’re going to face various types of buyer tactics. Some are more common than others and some are more challenging than others. Sellers who prepare for these types of scenarios are less likely to cave during negotiations. Buyers have been conditioned to respond in specifics ways. Your job is to uncover what’s really going on and respond appropriately.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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