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6 Ways to Make Your Customer Service Better

Client service is an integral part of any growing company. The best way to deliver amazing service is to listen, build trust and be responsive to customer needs.

Zach Cutler

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Offering great client service not only builds a loyal and happy customer base, but can be the most powerful marketing tool due to word-of-mouth referrals.

A 2013 study by Dimensional Research for Zendesk found 62 percent of business-to-business and 42 percent of business-to-consumer customers purchased more after enjoying a great customer-service experience.

On the flip side, the same survey discovered 95 percent of customers share bad experiences with their network, compared to the 87 percent sharing a positive experience.

Related: The 4 Things Every Customer Wants

How can customer service be improved? Here are six ways:

1. Truly listen.

Offer expertise, but make sure employees are listening as much as they talk. Great service isn’t about forcing a strategy that doesn’t work for the customer. Try to balance being an expert with listening to concerns and providing what customers think is right for their needs.

2. Be responsive.

Customers want service, fast. Even if the full answer can’t be delivered immediately, always email back the same day. Keep the customer looped into the process, and make sure they understand everyone is doing their best to ensure issues are being addressed quickly and fully.

3. Accommodate customers.

Unfortunately, customers can drop the ball just as often as companies. Sometimes a client will show up late to a call and sometimes a customer won’t have all the relevant information service-team members need to provide assistance.

While it can be easy to get aggravated, it’s important to accommodate customer needs. Keep in mind that every customer or client is a potential brand ambassador, meaning every interaction can be a selling point or a barrier to attracting more business.

Related: Show Genuine Interest in the Customer

4. Build trust.

A company-customer relationship does not need to be strictly platonic. Going the extra mile and showing passion for the client builds loyalty, trust and a longer customer relationship.

5. Live the company values.

To ensure a great client-service experience, the company needs to make service an important cultural value. When creating a company culture, standard practices, or a mission statement, highlight the importance of customer service. Making service a baked-in part of the culture means employees will be more likely to live the company’s values on a day-to-day basis, and create better service outcomes.

6. Don’t grow too quickly.

Don’t sacrifice quality in lieu of hunger for growth. At the end of the day, happy customers lead to word-of-mouth referrals and an overall positive company brand, image and reputation. This organic and steady growth is what will lead to a healthy company.

Keep in mind, a great service experience has the power to turn customers into fans, and clients into brand ambassadors for the company.

Zach Cutler is an entrepreneur and founder and CEO of Cutler, a tech PR agency in New York and Tel Aviv. An avid tech enthusiast and angel investor, Cutler specializes in crafting social and traditional PR campaigns to help tech startups thrive. He can be reached at zach@cutlergrp.com.

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Why Customers Don’t Respond To Disruption

You’ve got chatbots running your customer service, interactive screens across your stores and you’ve just appointed a chief digital officer. Why aren’t you seeing sales going through the roof?

PwC

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PwC partner Quinton Pienaar says there could be many reasons for this. But the short answer is probably that in your understandable rush to stay relevant and keep up with the latest technology trends and developments, you lost sight of your number one priority. You’re just not that into your customers – and they know it.

It’s fairly easy to get dazzled by the array of technologies out there. But the trap that you’ve got to guard against is that you start seeing the world through a technology lens, rather than a customer one. Remember, technology is a tool, not an outcome. It’s the means to the end, not the end itself.

That’s not to say you shouldn’t be transforming your business digitally. You absolutely should. But there’s a big difference between investing in technology to keep up with the Joneses, and investing in technology that’s going to drive specific business outcomes and improve the customer experience.

Related: Reimagine The Use Of Technology

In fact, it would be downright dangerous to ignore the game-changing benefits that the current wave of emerging technologies brings to the table. To understand what they can do for your business, you have to know what they are. We at PwC talk about the ‘essential eight’:

  • The Internet of Things (IoT) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) are the building blocks for the next generation of digital work.
  • Robotics, drones, and 3-D printing are all about machines that extend the reach of computing power into the material world.
  • Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) merge the physical and digital realms, and offer incredible advances in customer experience.
  • Blockchain rethinks our approach to commercial transactions by allowing participants to exchange value, and verify ownership of something, without a third party.

Some of these technologies are verging on science fiction. So how do we use them in a way that supports customer obsession? The starting point of any successful customer transformation is a customer-focused design that brings together three essential elements – business strategy, customer experience and technology – into a coherent, fully-fledged digital strategy.

In other words, today’s most successful companies have a strategy that is focused around a simple and regularly-updated list of priorities. They incorporate the new generation of technologies like IoT, blockchain and AI. But they keep their people, and their customers at the core of their business by designing strategies that directly address customers’ underlying needs and desired outcomes.

Related: Why Your Latest Tech Investment Might Not Be Wowing Your Customers

This sounds dead obvious. But what we find is that many companies we talk to are focused on growing their revenues, or making improvements to their products and services, rather than creating better customer experiences. Or they have the strategy, but are battling to execute it effectively.

Of course, to underpin this customer transformation journey, you’re going to need some data and the foundational technologies on which today’s innovations depend – data mining and analytics, mobile, and cloud. You may also need to rethink your processes to manage, enrich and maintain data, and operationalise it throughout your business.

So you have all of that in place? Good. Now stop. Breathe. Ask yourself whether your technology and data are truly supporting an unwavering focus on the customer. Because if you take one message from this article, let it be this: in today’s marketplace, putting your customer at the centre of your business is imperative to driving growth and profitability, winning market share and unlocking the value of your technology investments.

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Techniques

How To Seal The Deal By Understanding The 3 Phases Of The Customer Buying Cycle

If you want to close more sales, you need to understand the three phases of the customer buying cycle.

Pieter Scholtz

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A common misconception is that business transactions are simple affairs: Customers express interest in something, they buy, and then they leave. This is a vast oversimplification of what is at work.

Business majors and entrepreneurs have spent decades plotting out and exploiting every step of a customer’s buying process to better attract and retain clients. There are three sequential steps that customers take when they show an interest in purchasing something. Each phase reflects a different stage of their mentality, meaning that the ideal strategy to exploit each phase will differ.

These three phases are awareness, interest, and purchase. Awareness is the phase where they first become aware of the product or service that you are offering. Interest reflects the period where they show that they might want to buy your product — a customer that enquires about specific details relating to what you sell would be a good example. Targeted sales pitches are usually made in this phase. Lastly, purchase is the period where they make their final evaluation and the decision to purchase from you.

Understanding how to address the needs of each phase will go a long way towards boosting your sales and securing long-term business from your customers.

1. Awareness

This is the incipient phase of a customer’s awareness of who you are and what you are all about. This phase of the customer buying cycle is where customers make their first assessment of you. This phase is important because it’s where you can craft your message to appeal to the desired market segment.

Related: What Really Drives Sales Growth And Repeat Business?

Another important tool that is commonly used during this phase is Search Engine Optimisation (SEO). This refers to the practice of tailoring your website to the demographic that you wish to target.

Businesses will commonly insert relevant keywords into their indexed pages with the intention of leading searching customers to their website.

2. Interest

This phase of the customer buying cycle is when customers express interest in buying from you. The awareness phase is where you grab their attention, and this phase is where you have a chance to build upon it. Customers are typically non-committal during this phase; they are usually conducting additional research and/or shopping around.

Targeting buyers during this phase means that you need to give your potential customer a compelling reason to purchase from you instead of your competitors.

The responsibility here is two-fold: First, you need to market yourself as the solution to the customer’s unique problem. Second, you need to address the customer’s needs and perspectives. Businesses will frequently offer positive reviews and testimonials of their products to convince these potential customers that they offer the solution to their needs. Offering a persuasive sales pitch is only half of the solution: Make sure that the customer feels that you are concerned with what they want.

3. Purchase

This phase of the customer buying cycle includes not only the actual purchase of the product or service itself, but also the final evaluation. During this phase they might still be reviewing their options, however, the difference is that they have shown a distinct desire to purchase the product or service in question.

Related: 3 Strategies For Closing Sales Without Picking Up The Phone

This gives you an opportunity to give the customer a more comprehensive overview of what it is that they wish to purchase, and it is also the appropriate time to upsell additional products or features.

Car dealerships are especially fond of this point in the cycle. Once the customer sits down and begins negotiating the price of their future vehicle, the sales team moves in and does everything they can to get that person to buy the car. Whether they slash the price, throw in extra bonuses or offer them rebates, they will do whatever it takes to turn that expressed interest into an actual sale. This is where you want the sales team to take over: The amount of persuasiveness and personal magnetism they exhibit is every bit as important as their receptiveness and concern for the customer’s needs.

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Techniques

How To Get Past These 5 Common Challenges To Selling Online

From finding the right website builder to figuring out how customers will pay you, there’s a lot to consider when opening an online store.

Amit Mathradas

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With the new year comes the opportunity to look back at your business strategy and determine where you can grow. For many, taking their business online is still a bridge to be crossed – in fact, 29 percent of brick-and-mortar small businesses still don’t have an ecommerce website, according to a survey by Clutch of 355 U.S. small-business owners. And online shopping isn’t slowing anytime soon. Recent data from NRF shows that online and non-store holiday sales generated $138.4 billion – an 11.5 percent increase over 2016. The upside of online business expansion is too valuable to be ignored – opening a new sales channel and developing meaningful relationships with your customers can be the key to driving new revenue.

Before you open an online store, you need to be aware of the challenges you may face right out of the gate. Building a plan to address these can you set you up for success for when you finally open your virtual doors.

Here are five major things to consider when making the leap to selling online:

1. Finding the right service providers

When you build your website, one of the first critical decisions is finding the right service providers, from website builders to payments processors and everything in between. Do your homework to understand what features you’ll actually need, how the various services are priced and whether you’re getting a solution that can grow with your business. If you’re not sure what you need or what to look for, reach out to fellow business owners in your area for their recommendations.

Related: Have We Lost Our Face-To-Face Sales Ability?

Many providers also have resources that can help. For example, recent BigCommerce research showed that 64 percent of shoppers are more likely to make a purchase on an easy-to-navigate website, proving that aesthetics go a long way. The right provider can help you create a professional, secure customer experience while helping you understand why.

2. Making it easy for customers to pay you

Customers want choice, so be prepared to let them pay however they want. It’s a good way to increase customer satisfaction and help drive more sales. A recent PYMNTS.com Checkout Conversion Index shows that 40 percent of online shoppers abandon their carts in the period between visiting a business’s website and completing a transaction. So, if customers already have their payment information saved with a service like Apple Pay, Amazon Pay or PayPal, it’ll be easier for them to shop and buy – especially on their mobile devices – when you accept these payment methods.

3. Reconciling online and offline payments

online-payment-solutionReconciling online and in-store purchases can get tricky. That’s where cloud-based tools can save you time and headaches. For example, accounting software that integrates well with popular payment providers can help you track your invoices in one location. So, whether you get paid online or in your storefront, these tools easily and automatically reconcile the payments, cutting down on time spent manually sorting through spreadsheets and outstanding invoices. They can also be a big help at tax time.

Related: 5 Strategic Ways Your Sales And Marketing Teams Need To Collaborate

4. Expanding your customer base into new markets

One of the many benefits of selling online is that it opens up your business to customers in new markets around the globe. When selling overseas, however, it’s important to tailor your online shopping experience for international buyers. The key things to consider when selling outside your borders include: website translation; localized, secure payment methods; pricing that enables you to compete with local vendors; and transparency around currency exchanges and fees.

5. Connecting the in-store and online shopping experiences

Shoppers are increasingly expecting a more seamless, consistent multichannel shopping experience. It’s important to make your online and brick-and-mortar properties extensions of one another. Try offering services like “buy online, pick-up in store” and “buy online, return in store” to create unique and engaging experiences for shoppers that also help drive sales. This strategy also enables you to make the most of your physical presence in a way that online-only platforms can’t.

Making the move online is an exciting prospect for any business. Do your homework in the areas above to help you build a smart business plan that ultimately leads to growth in both your online and offline sales channels.

Resource: Apps To Help You Write A Business Plan

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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