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How to Better Retain Clients

It takes more effort to land a new client than it does to keep one. Learn the tricks of the trade to generate repeat sales.

Barry Farber

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While we all know the importance of prospecting, too many sales people focus on prospecting for new business, to the detriment of current clients and their own bottom line. And the amount of effort one puts into landing a new client is said to be five-to-10 times the effort required to retain that client. In other words, prospecting is much harder work than generating repeat business. So what are some of the steps you can take to ensure your customer stays with you and expands their business with your business? Here are three key activities that will build trust and future business opportunities.

1. Tie your products or services to the customer’s bottom line

In today’s world the bottom line is a high priority. It was a high priority yesterday too, but more and more companies want to know what you and your product or service will do to impact their sales, overall business growth and their long-term success. Keeping this in mind, it’s important for you to demonstrate how your product or service will increase their revenue and gross profits. Knowing how your customer makes money and measures their success must become one of your key goals.

First, keep it simple. When I sit down with business owners, I ask straightforward questions that will keep me close to the customers’ goals such as:

  • How does your business work and how do you make money?
  • What are your immediate and long-term goals?
  • Is there anything we’re not doing that we could be doing to serve you better?
  • What are the most important actions we can focus on to improve your business, sales and bottom line?
  • What has changed in your business since we first started doing business together?

I know some of you would say you should know that already, and I say, no kidding! But asking these questions will get you information that no website or research can match, and enable you to maintain their business for the long haul.

2. Build relationships with multiple players in the organisation

Doing this will ensure greater support for your services. Some sales people miss the opportunity to introduce themselves to others in the businesses they’re visiting. Maybe they think the individual is too low on the totem pole to influence any decisions.

As far as I’m concerned, everyone within an organisation has significance in future decisions. Who knows when that one person might get a promotion to the position where you need their help?

Or, how many times have you met someone in a company and they get hired at another company that ends up calling you. Why would they choose to call you? Because you became the mayor of your account. You treat each contact as the most important person when they’re in front of you.

Last month I made over 200 canvassing calls with a variety of sales people and you wouldn’t believe the insider knowledge we found from bellhops to security guards. By listening to everyone we encountered, we gleaned information that made a huge difference when we were in front of the VP and knew things about the organisation that even she didn’t know. Take the time to build as many relationships as you can. It will make a difference in the long run.

3. Let go of accounts that waste your time and money

Cut your losses with accounts that never seem to appreciate the value of your services; they take away from building the accounts that will pay off in the long run. They constantly hammer you on price, ask for everything for nothing and end up sucking the life out of you. Go after more qualified accounts so you can afford to pick and choose.

Proactive selling to your existing clients not only grows your sales, it builds your confidence and deepens relationships, too. Hmm, I can work less while still growing my sales? Now that’s a win-win.

Barry Farber is a top speaker and bestselling author of 11 books on sales, management and personal achievement.

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Techniques

How To Win Trust And Wax Sales

Small changes to your ecommerce platform could transform your turnover.

Daniella Shapiro

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Any ecommerce business venture is risky. Your products are not going to walk off the site by themselves from day one.  You have done your market research. You have identified and targeted consumer needs. You believe in your product.

What you need now is for consumers to believe in it too. But that is not enough. Your consumers also need to believe in you and your brand. Your ecommerce platform is the vehicle which allows the consumer to experience an insight into the quintessence of you, your product, and your brand.

Take your ecommerce experience from ‘what?’ to ‘wow!’.

The voice

Your ecommerce platform is a place that gives you, your brand and your products a voice. Your voice needs to speak out and tell your story. How you came to this point with your product. How and why you know it is the best on offer. Who you are.

What your brand stands for. Drive engagement with your voice through blogging. Show your investment in remaining relevant and meeting consumer needs. Invite feedback to build diversity and growth. Your products need a voice too, but they cannot speak for themselves. Let customers know your products’ worth by offering clear, detailed, jargon-free descriptions.

Give your customers pictures. Lots of them. From every angle. Show what you and your products are made of. Bring your products right into the customer’s home. If your products have got it, flaunt it. Convey an effective message that unites you as creator, your creations, and the lifestyle your brand is offering.

Authenticity, honesty, and clarity of purpose will connect the consumer to your brand in a real and relevant way.

Related: The Future Is Now – Ecommerce Retail Trends For 2019

Tell all, on call

Respond to consumer enquiries with as little delay as possible. These are personal interactions with the consumer that build relationships. Excellent customer service boosts positive feedback. Aim to provide as much detailed information about your business as possible. Be transparent, and proud of it.

An FAQ section is professional and helps address recurring questions regarding your products, services and business practices. Use the opportunity to provide further info about your brand’s integrity and professionalism. Refer to certifications and licenses. FAQs indicate honest, reliability and well-established business procedures, which further builds consumer trust. 

The allure of secure

A steadfast returns policy cuts the risk for consumers when making a purchase. It is far easier to commit if you are assured you can return the product with a full money back guarantee. Make this policy evident from the outset. Include a link to your returns policy on your landing page. Address all returns related queries in your FAQs. Consumers will also trust your ecommerce platform if you guarantee safety and security of information.  

Less is more!

Shipping costs are a turnoff. Many consumers abandon their carts just at the finish line because of this final hurdle. So, offer free shipping and seal the deal. Discounts and sales items must be in your face. Feature deals and reductions on your landing page with hard-to-miss, easily understandable images of slashed prices. Build some buzz around sales items with a sense of urgency.

Small trial samples in exchange for email details or a quick survey are another sweet deal. Everybody loves a sample. And you score business leads to follow up. The info you gather can help you to personalise user experience, and fine tune focused target marketing.

Related: Tips On How to Build Your First Ecommerce Business

That big red button

We have all encountered an enticing call-to-action button. One that offers the promise of a new start, that opens doors, that kicks in the rush of actualisation. A CTA that makes the customer feel like that button has their name on it is what it’s all about. ‘Buy Now’, ‘Add to Cart’, ‘Get Started’. The brand and lifestyle you are selling needs its own effective CTAs. They are the final frontier between deliberation and diving in.

The quick or the dead

First things last: Your ecommerce site had better load, and fast. This is vital. Already, 5 years back, failure to load with sufficient speed meant 1.73 billion GBP in lost sales. Consumer impatience is a fact. There are loads of options out there. Don’t be left dead in the water.

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Techniques

How You Can Guarantee Customer Satisfaction

Customer service is no longer a differentiator. Every business makes the same promises, and everyone says that they put their customers first. But do you? Here are three ways to up your customer-centric game.

Basil O’Hagan

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“We implemented a money-back guarantee at the Brazen Head at the Leaping Frog Centre, Fourways, offering a money-back guarantee on all our meals. Staff were reluctant at first, but the guarantee forced us to maintain standards at our front and back of house. In the end, we only had to honour the guarantee once in eight months.”

It’s a stock standard differentiator that every company uses: Customer service. And yet so many businesses are anything but customer-centric. Whether you’re in a B2C or B2B environment, here are three areas you could improve today.

1. Guarantee Your Service

If you don’t believe in your service, you can’t expect anyone else to. So, guarantee your service. This should not just be an empty phrase — back up your guarantee with a money-back promise.

Advertise that promise in your business, on your website and in your communications. That tells your customers, “We have such confidence in our service, and we’re so determined to be great that we put our money where our mouth is.”

Related: 5 Techniques To Leave Customers Grinning And Vowing To Return

The benefits of a money-back guarantee:

  • It encourages first-time customers to try your services.
  • It forces your team to keep standards high and focus on results, as slip-ups will hurt your business immediately.
  • It fosters pride in your business. “Our service is 100% guaranteed to be great!”
  • It is a selling point. “At Venus Video Games, satisfaction is guaranteed, or your money back!”
  • It sets you apart from your competitors. Would you rather try a new store that offers a money-back guarantee, or one that doesn’t?

We implemented this at the Brazen Head at the Leaping Frog Centre, Fourways, offering a money-back guarantee on all our meals. Staff were reluctant at first, but the guarantee forced us to maintain standards at our front and back of house. In the end, we only had to honour the guarantee once in eight months.

2. Complaints: Relate and Recover

Often, what a customer wants most from a company is to be treated like a person. They want real, authentic, human interaction.

Mostly, this human kindness will come while you cater perfectly to their every need, deliver the goods and services efficiently and then send them on their way with a massive smile on their face.

But every now and then things will go wrong. The customer won’t get exactly what they were looking for, the service won’t be 100%, or there will be some kind of misunderstanding.

This is unfortunate and of course nobody wants it to happen, but occasionally it does. If handled properly, these hiccups can be an opportunity to improve customer relations, build real human interaction and turn an unhappy customer into a happy one.

When a customer calls into your bank branch to complain that an unauthorised debit order was taken off her account, treat the person like you would like to be treated. Here is a good procedure to follow that fixes the problem while building a real human interaction.

  1. Understand the problem. Listen carefully and make sure you know exactly what the client’s complaint is.
  2. It doesn’t matter if they actually signed an authorisation and it’s technically their fault. This isn’t about who’s right and who’s wrong. It’s about building a relationship of good customer service.
  3. Take immediate action to fix the problem. In this case, reverse the debit order.
  4. Ensure it doesn’t happen again. That means working out who authorised the debit, and why and adjusting your systems.

If you go through this process as efficiently and as pleasantly as you can, you might find the customer comes out the other side in a pretty good mood. Their complaint has been acknowledged, they’ve got an apology and it’s been sorted out.

Service Tip: Don’t take customer complaints personally. They are part of your job, and your role is to handle them professionally. When a passenger of your airline says, “You’ve lost my bag!” they don’t mean it was you personally who lost it. But in this case, you represent your airline, so you should take responsibility, apologise and sort it out.

Related: Demanding Customers Are The Ones Who Motivate Innovation

3. Use Your Own Services

There’s no better way to check what your company’s service is like than by being your own customer. Of course, if people recognise you as one of their colleagues, they’ll be on their best behaviour, so use one of your digital channels, phone up or use a branch where they don’t know you.

Now pretend you’re a customer looking to make a purchase, but without too much knowledge of your systems. You’re a person off the street, as it were. What is your service experience like?

Here are some ways you can use your own services:

  • Try to get hold of your company. How easy is it to find your details? Is your website clear and logical, is your phone number prominently displayed? How is the phone answered?
  • Try to make a purchase. Is it easy? Is your query handled efficiently and quickly?
    • Most importantly, what’s the service like? Are the staff friendly, positive and dynamic? Do they go the extra mile to deliver exceptional service? Do they build relationships, do they provide help beyond just making the sale?
  • Phone to complain. Use the customer-care line, or website. You’ve been advertising this channel for years — what actually happens when someone uses it? Are complaints handled efficiently and in a positive spirit?
  • Leave a message. You can do this by voicemail, text or email. Does anyone get back to you?
  • Be inconvenient. Call over the weekend, after-hours, during lunch, or even during a busy period. Are the staff just as keen to help you? Can you even get hold of anyone?

Try to get hold of yourself. When last did you listen to your own voice message? What does the signature say at the bottom of your email? What does your switchboard operator say when answering the phone?

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Techniques

How To Manufacture Sales Urgency (Without Sounding Like A Scam Artist)

If you’re struggling to drive urgency in your business, here are three ways to do it.

Sujan Patel

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We’ve all seen those infomercials – the ones that urge us to call in to buy a blender or a mop or some other kind of gadget. If we call in the next 20 minutes, we’ll receive two for the price of one. Somehow, against my better judgment, I find myself thinking about calling in to cash in on the deal. But why?

It’s because those infomercials are all about urgency. You can use the same tactic to drive sales to your business, too.

Establishing urgency gives your customers a reason to act quickly. Their instinct is to take their time and think about the decision. But by throwing urgency into the mix, you’re eliminating the customer’s ability to think too hard or wait too long to buy.

But creating that sense of urgency isn’t always easy. Research from Hubspot finds that establishing urgency is the top challenge today’s salespeople face. If you’re struggling to drive urgency in your business, here are three ways to do it.

1. Establish scarcity

The more there is of an item, the less motivated we are to go out and get it. But if that item is scarce (or perceived as scarce), its value increases.

Related: Sales Strategy Example

Think of the iPhone. How many people do you know who run out to get the newest iPhone on the day of its release? They stand in line for hours, wanting to be one of the first to have the new product, and knowing that eventually the store is going to run out of iPhones – at least until they get another shipment. But that won’t be for months.

That new model iPhone is perceived as scarce. There aren’t many of them, and time is running out to get one, so your purchase decision needs to be made quickly. The same idea can be applied to your products or services. Perhaps you only offer a limited number of products or you only open registration for your event for a limited time. With the window of opportunity much smaller, your prospects will be more likely to buy.

2. Focus on your customers’ needs

Establishing urgency doesn’t always have to be about scarcity, though. You can create a sense of urgency by understanding, from the customer’s point of view, why they need the product now. This goes back to understanding your customers’ needs, which you need to know to sell anything to them. You need to get to the bottom of what makes your customers tick and what their pain points are. Then you can focus on how your products or services offer a solution.

The customer is always asking “What’s in it for me?” When they hear how your product or service aligns with their needs, they are persuaded to act. To the customer, their problems are urgent, and if you offer a way to solve them, they’ll be more likely to trust you and buy from you.

Related: Empower Your Team To Make More Sales

3. Show the consequences

As humans, we tend to avoid negative consequences no matter what. This “loss aversion” means we’ll do whatever it takes to avoid dangerous situations, losing the things we love or any other negative consequence. In fact, the desire not to lose is often greater than the desire to gain.

In sales, focusing on the consequences of not buying can have a great effect on a prospect’s decision to buy. You may choose to show how much money the prospect could lose if they don’t invest in your product or service, or how flawed their current processes are and how inefficient their business is. Whatever it is, focusing on the negative instead of the positive will have a psychological influence on your prospects, which will lead them to a purchase decision faster.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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