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4 Video Strategies That Will Help You Recruit the Best Talent

Technology has made it easier than ever to build effective, video-based recruiting strategies that allow companies large and small to expand their talent pools.

Andre Lavoie

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If you’re not at least considering using video as part of your recruiting strategy, you’re missing out. According to forecasts from Cisco’s February 2015 Visual Networking Index, video will make up 80% of all Internet traffic by 2019, and 67% of that Internet traffic will be accessed via mobile devices.

What does that mean for recruiting? It means reaching top talent using traditional methods is going to be a lot harder. The good news is technology has made it easier than ever to build effective, video-based recruiting strategies that allow companies large and small to expand their talent pools beyond their own backyards and source candidates from all over the country.

Related: 7 Questions To Ask Before Hiring An Adwords Agency

Here are four video recruiting strategies organisations need to start employing to attract and hire today’s top talent:

1. Company culture videos

One of the easiest ways for organisations to integrate video into their recruiting strategies is to show candidates why the organisation is great instead of telling them. According to Aberdeen’s October 2014 talent acquisition research, best-in-class companies are 75% more likely to use video tools for employee branding, enabling them to attract top talent.

That’s great, but how?

Organisations need to produce videos that emphasise company culture. Whether it’s showing what the office looks like, relating the organisation’s mission and values or highlighting its community service programmes, using video helps candidates see what really matters to the organisation.

Once the video is ready, focus on distributing it across different paid and free channels. For maximum exposure, host video front and center on the “Careers” and “About Us” landing pages, share it on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube accounts, and use paid advertising options to ensure active and passive candidates everywhere engage with the content.

2. Employee-focused videos

Get current employees involved in the video-recruiting strategy. Think about it: Organisations count on employees to engage with and refer strong talent. Why not let other candidates see how much those employees enjoy their jobs, too?

Instead of relying on text to get the job requirements and expectations across, use video descriptions to show candidates what a day in the life as an employee in that role is like, and attach it to the job listing.

For a truly unique perspective, interview employees about their roles in the organisation and what they do on a daily basis to make an impact.

Focus on things such as why they love their jobs, the challenges they face, the satisfaction they get from finishing projects and interesting facts about the employee, team or department.

Share these video “biographies” with candidates so they learn more about the people they could be working with and what drives them to succeed.

Related: 5 Tried-And-Tested Tips for Hiring the Best Talent

3. Video applications

Video helps with more than just recruiting top candidates, it helps with the screening process, as well. Instead of having to sift through countless resumes – or worrying that an applicant tracking system is missing qualified candidates – some organisations are using video applications as a first step in the screening process.

In fact, in a June survey, Futurestep found that 25% of the 700 executives surveyed work for organisations that use video applications as a part of their recruiting process.

Not only do video applications help speed up the screening process, but also they allow hiring managers to evaluate soft skills such as communication style, poise and organisation before they ever sit down with a candidate.

4. Video interviewing

Once an organisation finishes the screening process and moves on to the interview stage, video becomes even more useful. Whereas video applications allow candidates to highlight their strengths and weaknesses, video interviews allow organisations to dive deeper into the things that matter to them – a key reason video interviewing has become so important to organisations.

Futurestep’s executive survey found 71% of respondents use real-time video to interview candidates and 50% use recorded video interviews to narrow the candidate pool. In other words, integrating both live and pre-loaded video interviews into the recruiting process has become commonplace for successful organisations.

Video-interviewing software helps organisations extend their reach by getting rid of the costs involved with interviewing candidates who aren’t locally based. Using recorded, on-demand interviews, organisations can eliminate both the costs and the time investment necessary to interview multiple candidates at different times.

Related: 4 Steps to Hiring Killer Sales Staff

By reducing these costs, organisations are able to efficiently and effectively break-down geographical and financial barriers to top talent, thus creating a deeper potential candidate pool.

Implementing these four strategies will get organisations on the right track, but organisations need to continuously adapt and find creative – and cost-effective – ways integrate video into the recruiting process to successfully attract and capture today’s best talent.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

Andre Lavoie is the CEO of ClearCompany, the first talent-alignment platform that aims to bridge the gap between talent management and business strategy by contextualizing employees’ work around a company’s vision and goals.

Hiring Employees

Youth Employment An Opportunity

South Africa has a high youth unemployment rate – it is vital for business to consider alternatives for youth employment.

Henry Sebata

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A young female graduate with hands-on experience in setting up and running community projects, had resourcefully turned a hobby into an income-generating small business to support herself,  while seeking employment… a skilled person, wouldn’t you say?  It took her five long months to find employment – and in that time she received 50 rejections – 50 rejections with no useful feedback as to why she was being turned down.  We employed her – and within the first few days she’d surpassed our expectations, had added ‘value’, so much so, that two weeks later we assigned her to a project.

It’s this kind of potential that company recruitment approaches seem to overlook!

There are 6-million unemployed young people in South Africa – and the social and economic transformation economy that  is crucial for the country, is an economy that has been growing at less than the minimum 5-6 percent required to shrink unemployment, largely due to the under-performance of main institutions.

Related: Entrepreneurship – A Greener Pasture For Young People

Business accustomed to turning problems into opportunities of value-creation regards the South African Education and Training system as one that does not deliver in equipping young people with the requisite work and readiness skills.  There are government tax breaks and grants which provide opportunities for short term employment, but unfortunately these do not create value, nor are they sustainable as they are not used strategically.

Last year I had the good fortune to attend the Youth Employment Enterprise Skills Solutions (YEESS) summit in Nelson Mandela Metro – engaging with the young attendees I found that they were determined to change the view held by business that they are considered a risk, to one which recognises that they can, and do, add value and assist in realising opportunities, particularly because of their age -related attributes that give them the edge.

Young people

  • are a cost advantage – they cost less (South African staff is paid on the basis of the years of work rather than the value)
  • have a higher level of energy – they work faster and for longer hours
  • have flexibility – they learn new tasks /systems quickly, and are often more innovative
  • can increase revenue – they enjoy engaging with customers, and being ‘entrepreneurial’ (eager to promote products and services in the market)

Business should consider these opportunities – the model that many businesses currently use pays young people a stipend which usually just covers their living costs and employs them for a short period; and then the norm is to “find” something for them to do to keep them busy… a soul-destroying experience that in no way creates value and is certainly not one on which to build a career.

Related: Funding And Resources For Young SA Entrepreneurs

Alternatives to the existing model are to:

  • clearly pinpoint the opportunities and define the value (that the potential employee is required to add)
  • provide training – measuring potential is a challenge – a short training programme for job-seekers can clearly identify the ones who benefit most, and are thus likely to be the most valuable – and there is the plus of 4 BBBEE Skills development points for the training of unemployed people
  • provide a ‘proving’ period (3 to 12 months) where goals, expectations and support are clearly laid out -this provides an important business foundation experience in a productive environment considerably improving the chances of the young person’s absorption into the business culture.

By changing the way one views youth unemployment – to see youth employment rather as an chance to reduce costs, increase revenue and contribute to the building of skills and training future entrepreneurs – presents the perfect opportunity for business to contribute to the country’s future stability and gain economic returns.

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Company Posts

Temporary Employment Providers — Friend or Foe?

Contrary to the fact that legislation states that temporary employees work under a dual relationship between a TES provider and their client, the relationship has been questioned, confusing the situation and muddying the waters.

Workforce Staffing

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Currently, under a dual employment relationship, employees are given the protection of employment benefits under the TES provider and, after a three-month employment period, attain extra protection by being considered under the employment of both the TES provider and their client.

Yet various unions have pushed back against TES providers, citing that ‘labour brokers’ don’t have the best interests of the workers at heart. So, are TES providers truly the enemy — or could they be the solution?

What is a TES provider?

The term ‘labour broker’ is being bandied about with startling regularity. Surprising, because ‘labour brokering’ is actually a concept that no longer exists in legal terms, according to Joanette Nagel, Labour Specialist at Hunts Attorneys.

Related: Does A Strike Hit The Heart Of Your Business?

“It’s a term associated with ‘bakkie brigades’, those once comfortable picking up ‘piece workers’ and exploiting them with little to no consideration for labour laws,” Joanette explains. “Today’s TES providers are reputable organisations that, with the backing of the law and strict policies, provide a valuable service while ensuring that the rights and wages of temporary employees are in line with permanently employed staff.”

Sean Momberg, MD at Workforce Staffing Solutions, agrees: “A dual relationship where the employee is employed by both the TES and the client after three months means that the employee is actually afforded more protection. If, for example, the client falls into circumstances in which they can no longer honour the contract, such as if they go insolvent or a project is cancelled, the TES provider is still bound by contract to the employee and their rights to compensation, among others, are protected.”

The role of a TES in business

According to the Global Employment Trends for Youth 2017 study, conducted by the International Labour Organisation, the rapidly changing labour landscape has made the expectation of traditional or permanent employment less realistic than ever before.

“There is a global trend towards temporary employment that is supported by a new trend of flexibility in career choices as well as employment environments. The demand for TES providers to play a more active role in the labour market is higher than we have ever known,” affirms Sean.

Organisations will also benefit from this trend, especially as businesses can outsource all non-core related labour requirements, allowing them to focus on their core purpose and not concern themselves with the labour function, or the overheads associated with human resources. “A TES takes on the responsibility of employment, remuneration, legal disputes, strike mitigation, employee wellness, interactions with unions, and many other HR concerns that are extremely resource intensive,” says Sean.

A TES ensures economic continuation

“President Cyril Ramaphosa said in his recent YES initiative launch, that even those with further education often struggle to bridge the gap between learning and earning. TES providers help with bridging this gap, offering skills development that guarantees jobs,” notes Sean.

Related: Finding Success With Workforce Staffing In The Minimum Wage Reality

“TES providers are here to stay and offer the best of both worlds to organisations and employment seekers alike. Dual relationships continue to protect workers, underpinning and promoting their rights, while helping businesses to cover any skills and employment gaps within their organisations without having to invest in huge HR departments and legal representation to do so.”


Spotting a reputable TES provider

  1. Registered and compliant with the Labour Relations Act (LRA)
  2. Likewise with the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) and relevant bargaining councils
  3. Has the necessary insurance and off-balance sheet financial protection in place
  4. Able to provide proof of regular auditing
  5. Able to show full legal compliance and holds a letter of good standing.

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Hiring Employees

Million Rand Questions Answered By Founders Of Multi-Million Rand Businesses

Don’t waste your time asking job candidates to name their greatest weaknesses (yes, everyone will say they’re a perfectionist). Instead, try these four tips from seven entrepreneurs who offer up their best strategies.

Nadine Todd

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1. Interview for growth

Building and maintaining a sustainable business is having the right infrastructure to do so, and that takes people — great people. The problem is that while you’re on your growth path, you can’t necessarily afford the best and most experienced in the market, so the trick becomes hiring people who you can see will grow with the position — you’re not hiring for now, you’re hiring for where you want to be. When we interview, we look for hungry people.

We want to know where they see themselves five years from now. — Steven Kark, Paycorp 

Related: Why You Should (Seriously) Stop Hiring People

2. Look for accountability

One of our favourite interview questions is ‘Tell me about when you missed a deadline.’ It’s an immediate red flag if they say they never have; either they’re lying or they’re not accountable. We’re looking for an answer that says they had an issue, what that issue was, that they recognised it, and how they found a solution — solution and accountability are key. We also believe technology makes the whole process easier, particularly if you are stretched for time. Spend time designing questions and then get someone else to ask them. Video each interview, watch the interviews in your own time, and then select the top candidates for face-to-face interviews. — Elvira Riccardi and Donna Silver, Afrizan

3. Dig into their current environment

We can’t compete with corporates on benefits, so we offer something even more valuable: Time and flexibility. There is a caveat though: Don’t employ someone whose benefits were better than you can offer. We interviewed someone who was a perfect candidate, except she was coming from a large corporate that offered an on-site masseuse for free, amongst other things. As much as we loved her, we knew we wouldn’t hold on to her. She was used to an office environment that we could never offer.

You need to be hiring people who are stepping up; not the other way around. We always dig into what their current office environment is like. — Renay and Russell Tandy, Ngage

Related: Hiring The Right Person Is Critical When Growing A Business

4. Make them sweat

For years we had issues around high staff turnover. We realised that the problem started in the interview process. We were hiring the wrong people who didn’t suit our culture, and they would quickly burn out, or challenge our expectations. We realised that 80% of the success of a hire is culture. Natie Kirsh used to recommend going for a drive. He said that if you sit in the passenger seat and just chat, asking any questions that come to mind, the candidate will soon reveal themselves in the simplest ways. You’ll see the person, and you can make a judgement call on whether they suit the requirements of the position and the company.

We also love the questioning method of four-year olds. Whatever the answer to a specific question is, follow it with a ‘why’.

At the beginning it’s not even about the answer. Candidates will always arrive at an interview with certain rehearsed answers. If you keep asking why, eventually they have to start giving you completely unrehearsed, unplanned answers, and that’s when you’ll get a real sense of who they are. — Ran Neu-Ner and Gil Oved, The Creative Counsel

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