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Hiring Employees

How To Speed Up Your Hiring To Find Valuable Talent Now

What are you doing to nab that ‘purple squirrel’?

Heather Huhman

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Employers are spending more time than ever filling open positions. The latest MRI Recruiter Sentiment Study, released in 2015, reported that 37 percent of some 446 MRINetwork recruiters surveyed said that presenting job offers typically took them three to four weeks.

Another 31 percent of recruiters surveyed said they weren’t finding enough suitable candidates to fill open positions, citing this shortage as a major factor holding them back from hiring.

And that’s a problem, because the more time recruiters spend chasing after that “purple squirrel,” the more likely they’ll be to miss out on talent that is currently available. So, how can employers speed up the hiring process?

Related: Study Uber’s Hiring Practices to Build a Winning Team in the Sharing Economy

Here are three strategies for accelerating the search:

1. Look inward and implement an employee advocacy programme

Before trying to fill positions, employers need to know what talent they have on their hands. Perform assessments of your current staff to identify where talent is being used and where it is potentially being wasted. It may be time to hand out much-deserved promotions or implement solid retraining programs to sculpt the team to its best form.

It’s important, too, to utilise employees as a major marketing asset. Employee-advocacy programmes encourage the workforce to raise brand awareness through digital media and other channels.

An ideal employee-advocate will help you build a sense of ownership and loyalty to the organisation, while generating positive exposure and representing the best interests of the company.

These programs matter because they increase exposure to the public (through social media and brand pages), promote employee engagement while improving internal communication and guide efforts to provide customers with genuine interactions that are real and meaningful (through recommendations from family and friends).

A 2015 report by Hinge Research Institute and Social Media Today that surveyed 588 professionals who used social media for business purposes found that high-growth firms – those with revenue growth greater than 20 percent – were more than twice as likely as all other firms to have an employee advocacy program.

Start your own employee advocacy program by promoting a social media policy that encourages employee participation: Initiate an ongoing training course that provides materials that can be used to share the brand, and incorporate your brand into the overall marketing plan to measure the impact of its reach.

Employers can use the strong company culture an advocacy program facilitates to help build a referral culture into their companies, providing incentives for referrals and good hires.

Referral programmes can increase the quality and speed of hiring while inspiring employee engagement.

When employers trust their staffs, move to incorporate employee advocacy and referral programs and develop an accurate perspective on the talent they have, they can determine exactly what talent they need. Then, they can hire qualified candidates faster.

2. Screen candidates faster

employee-hiring-techniques

Employers should set shorter time periods for job postings, to avoid wasting time. One way is to refer to previous postings and cut 20 percent off their running time to test whether that has a measurable negative effect on the quality of hire. Chances are it won’t.

Next, enforce strict limits on resume-review time periods. Hiring managers should be aware when they reach the deadline.

Resume reviews are a great opportunity to identify high-demand applicants. And, once recognised, they should be categorised as high priority. These individuals may be the talent that has been falling through the cracks.

Focus on moving these candidates through the steps within two to three days. Services like Interviewed can help with the process.

Related: 5 Tried-And-Tested Tips for Hiring the Best Talent

3. Make a competitive offer from the get-go

What happens when an employer chooses a candidate to hire? According to the 2015 CareerBuilder study, 38 percent of the 2,002 employers surveyed said that it can take them more than three days after an interview to extend a job offer. The solution is obvious: Make the offer timely – and personal – to demonstrate genuine interest.

The offer should also be competitive. Eighteen percent of the employers surveyed in the CareerBuilder study said that candidates rejected their initial job offers and negotiated for a better one. The message here: If the offer is competitive, employers won’t waste time on salary negotiations.

Related: How SnapBill Supercharged Their Start-up By Hiring Right

Hiring managers should further avoid basing salary offers on the candidate’s previous salary. Instead, research the position and make like Vito Corleone – make them an offer they can’t refuse.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

Heather R. Huhman is a career expert, experienced hiring manager, and president of Come Recommended, a content marketing and digital PR consultancy for job search and human resources technologies. She is the author of Lies, Damned Lies & Internships and #ENTRYLEVELtweet: Taking Your Career from Classroom to Cubicle.

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Hiring Employees

How Your Company Can Easily Attract Fresh Talent

Well, there are many ways to go about attracting fresh talent, the easiest of which are…

Tasmin Copley

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The minds that are walking out of university these days have so much potential and power which many companies are longing for. Fresh new minds that are eager to start working and applying themselves in the “real” world. The best interests of your company lie in attracting this fresh batch of millennial talent. So how exactly could you do that?

Provide opportunities to learn

Millennials are after experience and career growth. They want to know that the company they will be working for is prioritising that journey. And what better way to encourage them on their career path than providing learning opportunities within the business?

A few of the main ways companies provide their employees with opportunities to learn are through internships, learnerships and mentorships.

  • Internships: An internship is like a pre-entry level position where interns have an opportunity to learn the ropes and figure out if this is, in fact, the industry or career they want to be building a career in. This is an extremely valuable and appreciated opportunity for most graduates and a way for companies to easily spot talent. If both parties are happy with how the internship has been carried out, all the employer needs to do is offer up a permanent post.
  • Learnerships: What is a learnership? And what are the benefits of a learnership in a company? A learnership is an educational training programme that companies offer to employees which allows them to gain work experience while learning industry-relevant theory. It’s more than a basic internship as learnership jobs can lead to a registered NQF qualification. This is beneficial to the company as they can be certain that all their employees are equally knowledgeable about their work and millennial applications will be flooding in for the opportunity to add further education and experience to their CVs through this opportunity.
  • Mentorships: Fresh minds are still newbies in the business and want to know that they’ll be taught (not spoon fed). This is where companies can offer mentorships that new employees can work with seasoned employees to gain business tips and insights that will help them become better. This is what graduates are looking for, an opportunity to learn from the best in order to be the best.

Related: Hiring Tip: Ask About The Candidate, Don’t Talk About The Position

Be an innovative environment

You can’t expect to attract fresh minds and creative talents when your company lacks an innovative environment. People want to know that they will be challenged and inspired every day by their work environment. And it’s not about working overtime to keep your new employees stimulated, but about making sure they have the resources, creative team members and freedom to think outside of the box.

They need to know that their innovation will be encouraged and supported. When advertising for vacancies, don’t be afraid to mention some of the innovative projects you’ve done. It will definitely excite any innovative minds on the job-hunt and those are the types of people you need to elevate your company.

Provide flexible work schedules

Flexibility is the work-trend at the moment and young people are looking for flexibility from their jobs. Being flexible with your work schedules is in your company’s best interest for more reasons than just the talent you’ll be attracting:

  • Discourage the turnover rate of employees as they will have an increase in employee satisfaction.
  • Increase in productivity from punctual and purposeful employees.
  • And there will be an opportunity for extended business hours to increase customer satisfaction.

If you offer and implement it in the right way, flexible working hours are probably the easiest way to retain current and attract new talent to your company.

Be digitally relevant

Having the latest technology and digitally-advanced business processes shows new talent that you’re all about adapting to the constantly changing environment. They will want to work for you because this strive for relevance means they will constantly have opportunities to improve and find new ways of taking the company and industry forward.

Related: How To Know If You’re Mismanaging Your Staff

Start by improving your office processes and being more digitally savvy. The more “ancient” your ways of doing things, the less fresh talent you’ll attract. People don’t want to sit and struggle through admin when their time could be spent on something more useful and relevant to the current era.

By making the most of technology, it also shows that your company chooses to be “green” with how they conduct business. And being part of a “save the planet” movement while doing your day job is what most young people strive to do these days.

Every company can easily attract fresh talent by implementing the above practices. And the resources that are spent is nothing compared to the revenue these new minds can potentially bring in by being part of your company.

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Hiring Employees

Youth Employment An Opportunity

South Africa has a high youth unemployment rate – it is vital for business to consider alternatives for youth employment.

Henry Sebata

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A young female graduate with hands-on experience in setting up and running community projects, had resourcefully turned a hobby into an income-generating small business to support herself,  while seeking employment… a skilled person, wouldn’t you say?  It took her five long months to find employment – and in that time she received 50 rejections – 50 rejections with no useful feedback as to why she was being turned down.  We employed her – and within the first few days she’d surpassed our expectations, had added ‘value’, so much so, that two weeks later we assigned her to a project.

It’s this kind of potential that company recruitment approaches seem to overlook!

There are 6-million unemployed young people in South Africa – and the social and economic transformation economy that  is crucial for the country, is an economy that has been growing at less than the minimum 5-6 percent required to shrink unemployment, largely due to the under-performance of main institutions.

Related: Entrepreneurship – A Greener Pasture For Young People

Business accustomed to turning problems into opportunities of value-creation regards the South African Education and Training system as one that does not deliver in equipping young people with the requisite work and readiness skills.  There are government tax breaks and grants which provide opportunities for short term employment, but unfortunately these do not create value, nor are they sustainable as they are not used strategically.

Last year I had the good fortune to attend the Youth Employment Enterprise Skills Solutions (YEESS) summit in Nelson Mandela Metro – engaging with the young attendees I found that they were determined to change the view held by business that they are considered a risk, to one which recognises that they can, and do, add value and assist in realising opportunities, particularly because of their age -related attributes that give them the edge.

Young people

  • are a cost advantage – they cost less (South African staff is paid on the basis of the years of work rather than the value)
  • have a higher level of energy – they work faster and for longer hours
  • have flexibility – they learn new tasks /systems quickly, and are often more innovative
  • can increase revenue – they enjoy engaging with customers, and being ‘entrepreneurial’ (eager to promote products and services in the market)

Business should consider these opportunities – the model that many businesses currently use pays young people a stipend which usually just covers their living costs and employs them for a short period; and then the norm is to “find” something for them to do to keep them busy… a soul-destroying experience that in no way creates value and is certainly not one on which to build a career.

Related: Funding And Resources For Young SA Entrepreneurs

Alternatives to the existing model are to:

  • clearly pinpoint the opportunities and define the value (that the potential employee is required to add)
  • provide training – measuring potential is a challenge – a short training programme for job-seekers can clearly identify the ones who benefit most, and are thus likely to be the most valuable – and there is the plus of 4 BBBEE Skills development points for the training of unemployed people
  • provide a ‘proving’ period (3 to 12 months) where goals, expectations and support are clearly laid out -this provides an important business foundation experience in a productive environment considerably improving the chances of the young person’s absorption into the business culture.

By changing the way one views youth unemployment – to see youth employment rather as an chance to reduce costs, increase revenue and contribute to the building of skills and training future entrepreneurs – presents the perfect opportunity for business to contribute to the country’s future stability and gain economic returns.

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Temporary Employment Providers — Friend or Foe?

Contrary to the fact that legislation states that temporary employees work under a dual relationship between a TES provider and their client, the relationship has been questioned, confusing the situation and muddying the waters.

Workforce Staffing

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Currently, under a dual employment relationship, employees are given the protection of employment benefits under the TES provider and, after a three-month employment period, attain extra protection by being considered under the employment of both the TES provider and their client.

Yet various unions have pushed back against TES providers, citing that ‘labour brokers’ don’t have the best interests of the workers at heart. So, are TES providers truly the enemy — or could they be the solution?

What is a TES provider?

The term ‘labour broker’ is being bandied about with startling regularity. Surprising, because ‘labour brokering’ is actually a concept that no longer exists in legal terms, according to Joanette Nagel, Labour Specialist at Hunts Attorneys.

Related: Does A Strike Hit The Heart Of Your Business?

“It’s a term associated with ‘bakkie brigades’, those once comfortable picking up ‘piece workers’ and exploiting them with little to no consideration for labour laws,” Joanette explains. “Today’s TES providers are reputable organisations that, with the backing of the law and strict policies, provide a valuable service while ensuring that the rights and wages of temporary employees are in line with permanently employed staff.”

Sean Momberg, MD at Workforce Staffing Solutions, agrees: “A dual relationship where the employee is employed by both the TES and the client after three months means that the employee is actually afforded more protection. If, for example, the client falls into circumstances in which they can no longer honour the contract, such as if they go insolvent or a project is cancelled, the TES provider is still bound by contract to the employee and their rights to compensation, among others, are protected.”

The role of a TES in business

According to the Global Employment Trends for Youth 2017 study, conducted by the International Labour Organisation, the rapidly changing labour landscape has made the expectation of traditional or permanent employment less realistic than ever before.

“There is a global trend towards temporary employment that is supported by a new trend of flexibility in career choices as well as employment environments. The demand for TES providers to play a more active role in the labour market is higher than we have ever known,” affirms Sean.

Organisations will also benefit from this trend, especially as businesses can outsource all non-core related labour requirements, allowing them to focus on their core purpose and not concern themselves with the labour function, or the overheads associated with human resources. “A TES takes on the responsibility of employment, remuneration, legal disputes, strike mitigation, employee wellness, interactions with unions, and many other HR concerns that are extremely resource intensive,” says Sean.

A TES ensures economic continuation

“President Cyril Ramaphosa said in his recent YES initiative launch, that even those with further education often struggle to bridge the gap between learning and earning. TES providers help with bridging this gap, offering skills development that guarantees jobs,” notes Sean.

Related: Finding Success With Workforce Staffing In The Minimum Wage Reality

“TES providers are here to stay and offer the best of both worlds to organisations and employment seekers alike. Dual relationships continue to protect workers, underpinning and promoting their rights, while helping businesses to cover any skills and employment gaps within their organisations without having to invest in huge HR departments and legal representation to do so.”


Spotting a reputable TES provider

  1. Registered and compliant with the Labour Relations Act (LRA)
  2. Likewise with the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) and relevant bargaining councils
  3. Has the necessary insurance and off-balance sheet financial protection in place
  4. Able to provide proof of regular auditing
  5. Able to show full legal compliance and holds a letter of good standing.

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