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Increasing Productivity

Loving What We Do

Love what you do and you’ll do it well.

Vanessa Gibb

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“And what is it to work with love?  It is to weave the cloth with threads drawn from your heart, even as if your beloved were to wear that cloth.

It is to build a house with affection, even as if your beloved were to dwell in that house.
It is to sow seeds with tenderness and reap the harvest with joy, even as if your beloved were to eat the fruit.
It is to charge all things you fashion with a breath of your own spirit, And to know that all the blessed dead are standing about you and watching.”

(Kahlil Gibran – The Prophet, 1923) 

While Kahlil Gibran was able to wax lyrical about the virtues of work, the majority of employees do not feel this sort of passion for their work. We are more likely to hear “I hate my job,” or “My job is killing me,” than “I love my job and my work fulfils me.”

Modern society tends to define us by what we do for a living; our vocation is a massive part of who we are. We spend so much of our time and the best years of our adult lives working, so it is imperative that we find something that we can love.

Related: This Is Going To Be A Kick-Ass Week

Would you want to be defined by a job that you merely tolerate? Or even despise?

At the same time, we – as a society that holds prestige and money in such high regard – should not push school leavers into fields of study because of financial gain or prestige; they should be encouraged to find something that brings them JOY! They should be reminded of the quote (often attributed to Confucius but there is uncertainty as to its origin) “Choose a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life.”

On a recent trip, I had the riveting experience of engaging with someone who clearly LOVED his work. This tour guide had the most infectious passion for what he was doing. He spends every day conveying (I assume) the same information to groups of tourists at a fairly small attraction. Not for one moment did I feel that he was merely reciting what he had been instructed to. Nothing in the way he behaved gave us the impression that he found his job mundane. He made the experience. We hung onto his every word and the magic of the place was only enhanced by his attitude.

happy-employee

This got me thinking… how can we get our employees and colleagues to be this excited about what we do?

More and more companies have acknowledged the importance of creating a work environment that people productively enjoy and that this is great for the bottom line.

A 2013 report by Gallup Inc. revealed that only 30% of the U.S. workforce is “engaged” in their work — this means that they are passionate about their work and feel strongly committed to their companies. The other 70% percent are either “not engaged” (those who are “checked out,” putting in time but without much energy or passion) or “actively disengaged” (act out on their unhappiness, taking up more of their managers’ time and undermining what their co-workers accomplish).

The report goes on to say that actively disengaged workers are more likely to steal from their organisations, negatively influence co-workers, miss workdays and drive customers away. According to Gallup, active disengagement costs U.S. companies $450 billion to $550 billion per year!

So how do we, as HR professionals, motivate or engage our employees, not just in the interests of their productivity and our companies’ bottom lines, but so that they can have that sense of fulfilment and joy?

Related: 3 Ways to Turn Employees Into Brand Ambassadors

According to Taylor Smith, American entrepreneur, “Today’s employee needs more than a steady job, good pay, and benefits to love their jobs. They have to see work as a place they enjoy going, where they can work on things that they feel are important, and then feel valued for doing that work.”

We have learned that some of the most effective methods of improving job satisfaction are

  • Flexible scheduling which allows staff to take advantage of technology to be able to work from a convenient location and work around the schedule of their family lives;
  • Effective management(a topic which has warranted the publication of thousands of books!);
  • Employee influence which relates to allowing the employee to have a voice in the organization and allowing creativity. (It is interesting to note that none of the top five methods relates to remuneration!)
  • Professional development – employers need to identify the strengths of employees and develop them. A People Accelerator has been introduced at NATIVE VML to drive the capacity of the company by identifying skills gaps and find smart ways to fill them. This person works closely with line managers to challenge, grow and retain great people.

It is better to love your work and earn less money or have to work longer hours than to tolerate a job simply because it is convenient or because it pays well. Loving what you do will be better for the business and better for your own health and wellbeing. And as clichéd as this is, it is worth reminding ourselves of this: If you can’t change your job, change your attitude!

Keen to join the leading digital marketing agency in Africa, click here.

Vanessa has experience in Human Resources generalist roles as well as specialised Organisational Development roles, but started her career in marketing. The relationship between an organisation and its people and how to improve that, is Vanessa’s specific area of interest. She is currently charged with finding, placing, engaging and growing top creative and technical talent for Native VML.

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Increasing Productivity

How To Build Organisational Wealth Through Increased Efficiency

Using the right business systems can allow your staff to become more efficient through best-practices and better process flows.

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As your business grows, the demands of running and managing all its parts increase. Fortunately, technology can help you standardise, streamline and adapt your operations in order to meet these increased demands. Let’s have a look at some of the ways in which you can increase efficiency to build your organisational wealth.

Integrated business units

It can be difficult to get a holistic view of what is going on in your business if information is floating between different departments and/or locations. Manually pulling data together can be very time consuming, causing delays and leaving greater room for human error.

Related: How To Improve Your Business Productivity And Efficiency With Help From Tech

By implementing an integrated business management solution, you can significantly increase efficiency among all your business units, allowing departments to easily share and access information. This real-time, inter-departmental integration allows you to get a birds-eye view of the performance of your business at the click of a button.

Business process automation

You can significantly save time by automating key business processes with an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system. Accounting, for example, is much easier when details of all transactions are quickly and automatically shared between departments (no need to manually upload or download information).

Automation will enable your teams to respond to customer enquiries with alacrity and maintain optimal stock levels. Through automatic alerts and responses, relevant managers will be notified when stock reaches predetermined minimum levels. When these levels are reached, purchase orders for replenishment stock are automatically generated.

Automation also enforces consistency in your business’s day to day operations by following local and industry best-practices built into the system.

Synchronised customer data

The success of any small to medium sized business depends on getting new customers and providing excellent products and services to existing customers. Collating and sharing customer data across all departments is essential for effective customer service. SAP Business One, for example, provides the tools to track and manage the entire sales process, from initial contact and invoicing through to project management and after sales support – playing a pivotal role in customer retention management.

This complete view of past, present and prospective customers, along with historic purchases will help you to better understand your customers’ needs, behaviours and preferences. This will enable you to respond to clients effectively in order to boost satisfaction levels, increase sales, maximise profits and ultimately promote client retention. In addition, your marketing team can better plan campaigns based on insights from accurate data about prospective and current customers.

Related: 101 Efficiency Hacks For Busy Entrepreneurs

Instant access to information

You have to be able to plan properly to stay ahead of your competitors. Having access to up to date, relevant and accurate business data removes the guesswork and empowers employees to make informed business decisions. With an integrated business management system, you will be able to better manage your cash flow and stock holding with a real-time overview of current stock levels, orders in process and outstanding payments. This, in turn, will save time and allow you to better manage your procurement process and help build organisational wealth.

Who doesn’t like it when a plan comes together and things are working well? Working smarter and better – not harder – is what increased efficiency is about. Your teams will share the benefits of increased efficiency as you grow your organisational wealth together.

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Increasing Productivity

Mi Casa Es Su Casa: Achieving Positive Corporate Culture

How to achieve positive corporate culture in a group company.

Greg Morris

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According to management consultant Peter Drucker: ‘Culture eats strategy for breakfast’. And there’s a good chance of this being true, especially since studies have shown a direct correlation between a strong, positive organisational culture and a business’s financial success.

The importance of culture

Prof JL Heskett writes in his 2011 book, The Culture Cycle, that a positive culture can make as much as a 20-30% difference in company performance, when compared with “culturally unremarkable” opponents.

Culture is also a form of protection – strong competitors may be able to copy a strategy, but can’t duplicate a culture. Indeed, when things go wrong in the economy, public opinion, or even the strategy itself, a company’s culture can serve as a safeguard against these, because employees are faithful to it.

But… while culture is a remarkable thing, it’s difficult to define and attain.

Related: A Culture Of Discipline Critical For SMMEs To Thrive

The definition of culture

Company culture is traditionally interpreted from a corporate perspective, to include the principles, opinions, basic assumptions, and mindsets that are shared by a group. But these don’t hold any value if they aren’t entrenched in a company’s processes. This is why culture is also about action.

A company can’t create an intelligible culture without people who a) agree with its core values or b) are prepared to commit the time needed to.

Further, those employees who succeed in a company are generally those who most closely associate with the culture. If the principles and ideals of an organisation are shared, a strong culture can even support recruitment through self-selection.

As a result, leaders should spend as much time determining, collaborating on, and communicating culture as they do on strategy.

Culture in a group company

With different and broad-ranging companies working together, the goal of building and sustaining culture in a holding company can be trickier than in other organisations.

In cases like this, it’s critical for every company in the group to hold onto its own distinct culture, in ways that fit the greater business.

Simultaneously, the parent company should create a culture for all of the holding companies to attach to. Because, without a uniting mechanism, real integration can be difficult to accomplish.

The problem is: which culture is the priority? The composition of a group company evolves as it acquires and sells different companies, so a root culture is necessary; one that current and new subsidiary cultures can buy into.

Related: The 7 Culture Pillars That Will Skyrocket Your Start-up To Success

Where to start

  1. Develop a set of principles, behaviours, and motivators for culture, and define what these mean practically.
  2. Write a positioning statement to share what the organisation stands for, both externally and internally. For example, Google’s is “organising the world’s information and making it universally accessible and useful”.
  3. Generate a motto that summarises your culture. Google’s is: “Don’t be evil.” In other words: do positive things for the world, even if it means letting go of some short-term wins.
  4. Communicate these messages widely and repeat them continuously. (As obvious as this sounds, many group companies make the mistake of not communicating values to subsidiaries.)
  5. Invest time and resources into smoothing out the cultural differences every time a new company is acquired. This is important because an implosion of combined cultures can cost valuable talent, customers, or worse.
  6. Teach the culture. Not just through induction programmes for new employees, but through ongoing events, reminders, collaborations, and other ways that remind people what the culture looks and feels like.
  7. Share and ingrain the group’s root culture, as an element of unity.

The heart of the matter?

Peter Drucker highlights a potent triad in organisational transformation: Strategy, capabilities, and culture. He says that all three must be created together, aligned, and designed to be supportive of one another. This is more complex in group companies but, with strong communication and high levels of collaboration, a clear and productive culture is possible.

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Increasing Productivity

Why Deadlines Aren’t As Great As You’d Think For Creative Work

Be careful about how much time pressure you put on yourself.

Nina Zipkin

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Do you ever find yourself staring down at a deadline and just freeze? There is something to be said for setting a schedule for yourself and following through, especially when you are first starting a business, but recent research from Harvard finds that when you are dealing with creative pursuits, you need to give yourself enough time to breathe, otherwise you’ll just be doing busy work instead of actually building something that is truly innovative.

In an interview with Harvard Business Review’s Working Knowledge podcast, Professor Teresa Amabile said that during a hectic day, it’s possible to get a mistaken sense of creative energy powered by adrenaline simply because things were being crossed off a checklist.

“People who are under a lot of time pressure on a given day, actually feel very productive, they tend to feel very creative,” she said.

“But, here’s the interesting thing; they were actually significantly less likely to come up with creative ideas, or solve problems creatively on those days. They got a lot of stuff done, but they weren’t necessarily creative.”

Related: Follow These 8 Steps To Stay Focused And Reach Your Goals

She noted that in her research, people came up with the most creative solutions when they were working under low to moderate time pressure. So the next time you think about imposing an arbitrary deadline on developing new ideas, you might want to go easier on yourself.

Because feeling like you’re on a treadmill doesn’t only make your thinking more fractured, Amabile says that it also makes it tougher to find meaning in your work. So what can managers do to make sure that their employees always have time to innovate? Start with providing spaces where they can be quiet, focused and away from distractions.

“Let them understand the importance of what they’re doing, their own individual actions, and how that translates into something that will contribute to a customer need, to a societal need, to something that the company really needs to move forward,” Amabile said.

“Try to give people enough time for projects so that they can explore, so they can do that background research to get the information they need, and then so they can play with it somewhat. That doesn’t mean indefinite time frames, but it probably means longer time frames than people are usually given in most companies for most projects.”

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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