Connect with us

Managing Staff

Transform Your Corporate Culture In Six Steps

Through a well-timed organisational culture turnaround strategy, Prommac grew by 10-fold in five years…. here’s how.

Published

on

corporate-culture

Having a great business culture does more than just create a great place to work, it attracts top talent, contractors and partners. However, research suggests that only 40% of employees are happy at work, and that this is likely the result of a poor culture! The quality of a culture is revealed in how people feel when they are working with or within an organisation.

Thanks to social media, disenfranchised employees are the number one critics of their employers, which is bad for both reputation and productivity. Conversely, social media offers employers insight into employee sentiment and the opportunity to respond positively.

Related: How To Build A High Performance Culture In The Work Place

Here are my six tips for boosting your business culture:

1. Start at the top

As the business owner, you need to walk the talk. Positive energy is key because your behaviours reflects the health of your business. If times are tough and you appear stressed it can cause anxiety throughout an organisation.

2. The basics

Who is the most important employee in the business? Is it the security guard or the chief operating officer? The answer is both, as both people have something to offer and want to contribute meaningful input. Letting people know how they personally add value and recognising their contributions is what builds a team.

In my business, everyone wears a name tag, and connecting on a first name basis builds a sense of belonging.

Your team extends to your suppliers. The insights that they provide is key, and the way you treat them influences how they speak about you –  how often have you promoted another business because doing business with them is a pleasure?

3. Inclusivity

Change is the root of innovation, yet people are fearful of change, especially if they are not consulted. Staff buy-in is key to growing a successful culture, and idea generation helps employees feel included.

Related: 5 Inexpensive Ways to Create a Company Culture Like Google’s

Also, even seasoned leaders need fresh perspectives to keep them current. For example, millennials are plugged in to technology and always know what’s hot and what’s not; while ethnic diversity offers different social and cultural views.

We rolled out Idea JAM sessions to develop employee-based solutions to organisational problems, including appointing employees as CEO for a day. Each employee has a unique background and context, and combining these in the same think tank can generate impressive and innovative results.

4. Direction

business-management-direction

You need to know where you want to go. So, set the tone for the culture by reviewing the key themes generated through the idea JAM sessions, and then pick those that stand out as the leading inhibitors to your goal.

There is no one size fits all culture, but there is something to be said for bringing a team together to set a common vision.

5. Measurement and feedback

There is no management without measurement! Dedicate time to building company surveys that ask the difficult and revealing questions. Be bold and don’t be afraid of the possible answers.

Negative answers create an opportunity to improve. Focus on employee health with questions like:

  • Are you growing in your professional life?
  • Are you overloaded with work?
  • Does the company takes advantage of you?
  • Do you understand the strategic vision of the company?
  • What type of leadership structure do you feel the company has?
  • Are you empowered to make decisions appropriate to your level?

Reflect on the critical areas of the business and ask employees to rate the top three areas where the organisation is lacking, such as:

  • Salary Package
  • Health & Safety
  • Training & Development
  • Career Path
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Social Impact Projects
  • Recognition
  • Brand Awareness

You can also modify the questions to suit your suppliers.

6. Implementation

Leadership buy-in is crucial, so build culture measurement into your management team’s KPI structures. Whether it is attending functions with employees, spending time understanding and mentoring their teams, or being a mentor.

Culture is something that is taken very seriously within Prommac and the focus on developing a positive culture has led to excellent results.

Related: Richard Branson on Thinking Big

YPO Johannesburg member, Jason English, CEO of Prommac, previously spent a decade at a leading international engineering construction company, where he served as Global Project Development Director, Technical Support Services. Jason has also worked on large-scale shutdowns in the Petrochemical, Mining and Power sectors for blue chip clients, and served on the international panel for shutdown experts in the UK. He is registered with the Institute of Directors of SA. He is a qualified mechanical engineer and holds an MBA.

Managing Staff

5 Things To Do When An Employee’s Performance Deteriorates

It can be confusing and frustrating when a successful employee’s performance takes a nosedive. Intervene effectively using these five steps.

Liz Kislik

Published

on

employee-management-advice

For all kinds of reasons, even longstanding, highly productive employees can experience a performance slump at some point. The Towers Watson Global Workforce study showed that up to 26 percent of workers surveyed said they felt disengaged, and another 17 percent felt detached.

As a founder, you may not always find an obvious way to get someone back on track, but the investment of energy you would need to turn this situation around is still so much less than what would be needed replace and train a new employee.

So, the upshot is that it only makes sense to figure out what’s going on and take action. Ready? These five approaches may help.

1. Ask explicitly if the employee is okay

And find out if there’s anything that you should know about instead of assuming you understand this individual’s current circumstances and reactions. Of course, it will help if you’re already aware of his or her personal situation.

Perhaps the employee is dealing with a new and challenging circumstance that’s distracting. In that case, it can help to share your evidence: “James, I was wondering if everything’s okay. I noticed that you stopped/started doing X, and I figured I’d better check in with you about it.”

At one of my clients’ companies, when a leader touched base with a staffer who had fallen below expectations, the woman explained that her dog had died, and she was grieving. Knowing her boss cared about her helped her refocus on her work.

2. Look for signs of stress and burnout

stress-and-burnout

Burnout costs U.S. businesses as much as $300 billion each year, whether the reason is employees having had to absorb too many changes or the fact that they’ve just been plain old working too hard for too long.

A longtime administrator I knew was being criticised for her negativity, her self-pacing and  her avoidance of anything new. After some analysis, however, it became clear that there was more work than her team could handle. Once her team was staffed up and the new team members were reasonably up to speed, she started to recover her resilience and became more even-keeled.

Related: Why I Stopped Doing Annual Employee Reviews

3. Probe for changes in the employee’s job

Perhaps there are new problems with equipment, resources or information flows; maybe a major customer is giving the employee a hard time, or a manager is behaving differently in some way.

A CEO I work with was concerned about a downturn in an executive’s previously outstanding performance. We discussed how the employee had recently been assigned to lead a new initiative for which he did not have previous experience, although he was the best internal candidate. The CEO agreed that as soon as the new initiative could afford to pay for an experienced executive, the reassigned employee should return to the assignment where his performance had been consistently superior.

4. Describe your expectations for the employee’s performance

employee-performance

And talk about how the business, team or customers are affected when it’s lacking. Although up to 87 percent of employees in one survey reported by Strategy + Business said they wanted opportunities for development, only one-third reported actually receiving feedback to help them improve.

So, make sure you’re concrete and specific about both expectations and impacts. Ask what employees need from you or from others in the organisation to help them get back on track.

I had to give one senior leader excruciatingly detailed feedback, in areas from interpersonal dynamics to personal hygiene. It wasn’t pleasant for either of us, but until he was made aware of exactly what was disturbing to customers, there was no hope for improvement.

Related: How Diversity Drives Board Performance

5. Provide meaningful recognition

Employees in  a survey by the Cicero Group were three times more likely to choose recognition as the single factor most likely to motivate superior performance– over inspiration, autonomy and even pay.

Recognition doesn’t have to be expensive or even time-consuming. One leader I knew started using the daily standup meeting not just to review the progress of the work, but also to mention superior contributions and excellent performances. Not only did preparation for the daily meetings improve, but team members were eager to make contributions that could be noted.

In sum, even excellent performers can lose momentum or be stalled by circumstances from time to time. How to respond as the employer? Intervening early will help you feel optimistic about a positive outcome and give the employee involved the benefit of the doubt so you can demonstrate to staff the confidence you have in them and your willingness to provide support during a tough time.

Just don’t wait to do this: If you wait till you’re fed up with either the person or whatever’s going wrong, you’ll find it much harder to turn the situation around.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

Continue Reading

Managing Staff

Managing Multicultural Teams

In this article we answer some key questions around managing multicultural teams.

Dr Sorayah Nair

Published

on

managing-multicultural-teams

Companies that have greater gender and cultural diversity, particularly at senior management level, have consistently reported higher than industry profitability – as shown in McKinsey’s latest Delivering through Diversity’ report. The statistics gleaned from the report show that companies in the top 25th percentile for gender diversity on their executive teams are 21% more likely to yield above-average profits.  Furthermore, executive teams that are more culturally and ethnically diverse are 43% more likely to report more favourable bottom line figures.

Whilst the findings do not directly confirm the correlation, that increased diversity results in increased profitability, it is hard to ignore the consistency comparing outperforming industry rivals. The benefits of diversity are strongly suggestive, however, managing the challenges of diversity in the workplace can be challenging. It requires leaders with high emotional intelligence (EQ) that focuses on open communication and building an inclusive culture.

In this article we answer some key questions around managing multicultural teams, including:

  • What are some of the challenges of workplace diversity?
  • 5 essentials to managing multicultural teams
  • What is the future of cross-cultural training? 

1. What are some of the challenges of workplace diversity?

For a start there is not enough diversity in the workplace. Statistics suggest that we do not have enough representation of women and, in particular, people of colour in senior management positions and even less at board level. The dearth of women and cultural diversity is a global problem and not just a South African one.

To address diversity organisations need to:

  • Make a compelling case for diversity.
  • Invest more in employee training.
  • Expose all staff to diversity and inclusion workshops.
  • Ensure that hiring, promotions, and reviews are fair.
  • Give employees the flexibility to fit work into their lives.
  • Focus on accountability and results. (McKinsey report, 2017)

Related: 5 Tips To Make Managing Employees Less Stressful For Everyone

2. Five essential to manage multicultural teams:

It is important to understand that culture is fluid. It is also common to find people identifying with more than one culture. This means that we need to be careful about making the error of cultural stereotyping. There are as much differences within cultural groups as there are between groups.

So the way to manage multicultural teams, I believe, should be no different to managing any team. If we want great teams then managers need to have the following attributes;

  • High EQ
    • Awareness of self (ability to self-regulate)
    • Awareness of others (Skilled at relationship management)
    • Motivated
    • Empathic
  • Be skilled communicator
  • Be inspirational
  • Be courageous
  • Understand diversity (in all its forms) 

Here are five ways to get the most out of a multicultural team:

Clearly communicate the “Why” (Simon Sinek)

It is important for leaders to clearly communicate the organisation’s vision and to ensure that the message cascades throughout the organisation. Organisations where staff are clear about their purpose and know what is expected of them, show less entropy (time spent on non-revenue generating activities). Staff also report higher job satisfaction when their purpose is clear.

Create an inclusive culture

Leaders need to create a space that allow everyone a seat at the proverbial table. Staff need to feel they have a voice and that their opinions matter.

Create a psychologically safe workplace

Employees need to feel safe to express their opinion without fear or favour. It is the manager’s responsibility to ensure that the right culture (the way things are done daily) is in place and that candid conversations are encouraged.

Allow employees to bring their ‘whole-selves’ to work

It is important for managers to get to know their employees. Managers need to make time to enquire about their lives outside of the workplace.

Create a culture of accountability

All employees need to understand the role they play in the long-term sustainability of the organisation. Employees who need support should be encouraged to ask for help timeously as their contribution impacts the whole organisation. This understanding of the individual contribution to the collective outcome should also encourage staff to support each other and discourage the creation of silos in the workplace.

Related: Your Employees Are Your Greatest Asset – Manage Them Well

3. What is the future of cross-cultural training?

The global trend is towards the need for greater cross-cultural awareness. In South Africa particularly, we are becoming increasingly aware of the legacies of our political history that continues to negatively impact the world of work.

Cross-cultural training or diversity and inclusion needs to intensify – for that we need our industry leaders to be courageous and know that increasing diversity not only makes good business sense, but that it’s the right thing to do.

For more information on online courses that help with managing multicultural teams, visit USB-ED.com.

Continue Reading

Managing Staff

From Employee Engagement To Empowerment

Engaged employees will go the extra mile to resolve a client’s problem or close a sale, they contribute to a culture that consistently delivers great service and they drive company growth. Here’s why.

Sandra Burmeister

Published

on

employee-engagement

“Engaged employees are more innovative and take the success of the company personally.”

Employee engagement is defined as an active state related to productivity and innovation. Engaged employees can be described as being fully immersed in and enthusiastic about their work. This emotional attachment means that employees will go above and beyond the call of duty. Employee engagement differs from employee satisfaction. Satisfaction can be described as being happy at work. Engagement takes employees to another level.

Engaged employees will go the extra mile to resolve a client’s problem or close a sale, they contribute to a culture that consistently delivers great service. Engaged employees take ownership, deliver on their commitments in and outside the organisation and are passionate about satisfying the customer because they own the result of their work.

Simply put, engaged employees are a prerequisite for building high performance teams within an organisation.

Unleash potential

A recent Gallup survey on the State of the Global Workplace shows that a way to significantly increase productivity is to unleash employees’ potential by allowing individuals to identify, develop and use their natural talents so they become strengths. Employees who use their strengths on the job are more likely to be intrinsically motivated, and teams who know each other’s strengths relate more effectively to each other, boosting group cohesion.

Related: How To Build Better Employee Engagement

The survey also shows that making better use of employees’ strengths requires businesses to grant workers greater autonomy to use their strengths, which requires a profound management shift in which more personalised relationships and positioning team members for maximum impact occurs.

The resulting sense of empowerment, however, benefits both the employees and the organisation. Higher levels of autonomy also promote the development and implementation of new ideas, as employees feel empowered to pursue entrepreneurial goals that benefit the organisation — that is, to be ‘intrapreneurs’.

In addition, talented managers are critical players in implementing a performance- orientated, engagement-based and strength-focused culture and aligning the leadership and employee values. This individualised approach helps great managers account for generational differences in employee expectations, in particular Millennial employees that prefer a higher level of flexibility.

Amongst the top performing companies, in any survey, 60% to 70% of employees are engaged at work. This is a clear financial incentive for leaders to take employee engagement and empowerment seriously. Engaged employees are more innovative and take the success of the company personally.

Focusing on engagement

There are a number of additional activities to help leaders succeed in employee engagement. These include: Strong visible values in the organisation, understanding and addressing employee expectations, career pathing with tailored development programmes to help employees achieve their goals, great communication tools and internal social collaboration for peer-to-peer learning and collaboration, knowledge transfer and helping the company expand the use of best practices, along with a great reward and recognition programme.

The African continent, in particular, offers companies and employees more opportunities to be involved in community improvement projects and company-wide CSI programmes, which also increases the feel-good factor in the organisation and ultimately contributes towards an increase in employee engagement.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

SPOTLIGHT

Advertisement

Recent Posts

Follow Us

Entrepreneur-Newsletters
*
We respect your privacy. 
* indicates required.
Advertisement

Trending