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Are You Suited to Entrepreneurship

Asking The Wrong Questions Will Break Your Business

After almost two years of interviewing entrepreneurs, billionaires and CEO’s on my podcast the Matt Brown Show, I’ve noticed a commonality between them that I think may have the answer to the question about why some entrepreneurs start one successful business after the other and while others fail.

Matt Brown

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One of the great mysteries of entrepreneurship is why businesses fail. After almost two years of interviewing entrepreneurs, billionaires and CEO’s on my podcast the Matt Brown Show, I’ve noticed a commonality between them that I think may have the answer to the question about why some entrepreneurs start one successful business after the other and while others fail.

Curiosity Never Killed Any Cat

It can all be summed up with one word. Curiosity.

In dozens of interviews this reference to curiosity has come up. The best in business are incredibly curios and when someone is curious, they focus their curiosity through questions.

The most successful entrepreneurs I know literally question everything – all the time. They ask questions like: “why does it have to be this way?” Or, “what if we stripped the business down to its bare bones and rebuilt it?” Or, “what if we took the business into an entirely new market?” The reason they ask searching questions like this is because they are naturally curious about the answer. While they may seem like simple questions, searching questions like this are designed to seek clear facts that ultimately inform the decision-making process.

Related: 5 Answers From Digital Kungfu On Why Podcasts Are Your Best Self Development Tool

The Power of Questions

On average I ask a guest on my show about 40 questions per episode. This means that over the past two years, I’ve asked billionaires, CEO’s and entrepreneurs approximately 3,000 questions and if I could point to one thing that I’ve learnt in the process, it would be this: if you don’t ask the right questions, you’ll never get the right answers.

I’ve learnt that successful people in business are driven by an insatiable desire to increase their knowledge, skills and understanding. They are constantly learning and by asking the right questions, they automatically empower themselves to make better business decisions.

Decisions Are Your Ultimate Power

Ultimate Power

The ability to make great decisions in business is a skill that anyone can learn. For instance, when a new business opportunity comes your way, do you decide to take it or let it go? It’s an important question to explore because in business, while some opportunities may be right, but they may not be right for you.

In a high-stakes game like running your own business, when you make a good decision it can pay massive dividends but contrary to that, if you make a bad decision the consequences can be severe.

A decision represents your ultimate power in business because when you truly decide to do something, it unleashes the invisible forces that motivate your actions, and execution is nine-tenths of the law in business.

How A Simple Decision Lead to The Birth of a Media Company

When I made the decision to start podcasting, I never dreamed that I would end up with a media platform that would be consumed in over 100 countries. Looking back, I can clearly recall the question I was asking myself day in and day out.

That question was this: “How can I make a difference to South African entrepreneurs?” This question lead me to deciding to start a podcast, which eventually led to the formation of Matt Brown Media – a company which today is helping businesses tell their own stories through branded content AKA podcasting. But if I had never asked that question in the first place, I would never have achieved anything.

Related: The Business Plan Is Dead

Conclusion

Questions govern pretty much everything we do and they often lead us to ask further questions as our knowledge and understanding grows. The trick is to figure out what are the right questions to focus on, as asking the wrong questions, can change the direction and shape of the future of your business.

If you’d like more information on how to create a podcast for your business, please get in touch.

Are You Suited to Entrepreneurship

Going It Alone In Business? 5 Reasons That’s A Really Bad Idea

Being a solopreneur sounds great, but it’s actually a poor choice for your business.

Luis Congdon

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When we read about Elon Musk, Richard Branson, Arianna Huffington and all the other business giants – we immediately see a single champion. Much like old literature traditions where the hero triumphantly wins alone, our legends in business are often portrayed as the singular hero.

Steve Jobs reigning over Apple, Bill Gates towering over the giant that is Microsoft and Richard Branson stylised in his cape throughout the veins of Virgin – this kind of mythology and idealisation of the single hero in business has spurred a new wave of entrepreneurs who call themselves “solopreneurs.” We idealise the entrepreneur who does it alone and doesn’t need a team or support.

If you’ve been doing it alone or aspire to become a solopreneur, let me share with you five reasons to not be a solopreneur – and why the myth of any singular hero, whether in literature or business, is a misnomer and will only hold you back from having the most significant successes.

1. You’ll become a jack of all trades and a master of none

When you are a solopreneur, it’s practically impossible for you to master every skill needed to substantially grow.

Running a business takes a lot of capabilities: Mapping out content, creating it, sharing it, building a tribe, sending out emails, doing sales, attending events and growing the network, coaching, consulting and building out products is a small list of what a profitable business requires.

If you’re weak in some of these areas, it will hamper your business growth and fun.

Related: The Foundations Of Growth

Trying to do it all will soon see you doing low-level activities that pull you away you from making sales, doing projects for your high-end clients and doing the things that help keep the business growing.

2. You can’t scale or grow

business-strategist-jay-abrahamBusiness strategist Jay Abraham says there are only three ways to grow a business. You either get more clients, increase the cost of each transaction or you service your clients with more products. Two of these methods will mean more work.

If you increase clients or increase the number of products you sell, you will most likely need to increase your output.

Since there are only so many hours in a day, you’ll either become your own bottleneck and slow business down – or decide to outsource some of the tasks to your team and ensure business runs smoothly.

3. You won’t have time to do everything you want to do

When you’re overworked and doing it alone, you have no one to relieve the pressure. You have no team to support you, and you have no partners who can take some work off your plate. That means when there are emergencies, you won’t be available.

If a client needs you, your kids need you and a new client wants to pay you a lot for a new project – you’ll have to decide which is most important.

While having a team may not save you from making hard decisions, ideally you aren’t so thinly spread out that you find yourself saying no to more clients, family emergencies and serving current clients to the best of your abilities.With a team, you’ll be able to free yourself more, and you can say yes to more opportunities.

4. You’re more vulnerable to mistakes

Imagine if didn’t have spell check your documents and emails. Or what if this magazine didn’t have editors and any article got through? I’m sure you’d agree, the quality would be lost, and it’d likely result in many lost customers.

Related: The Case For A Business Partner Who Makes You Uncomfortable

In my life, I’m lucky to run a business with my wife and my team. Having a team helps me to not only “cut once and measure twice,” it also relieves some of the pressure to be perfect. It helps me to do my work, knowing my team will help me, and that inspires me. Doing it alone would be too stressful.

Having a team will allow you to call upon a support network, hand off jobs and have an extra set of eyeballs when you’re delivering a service.

If you’ve aspired to be like Elon Musk, Richard Branson, Arianna Huffington or any highly successful entrepreneur – take some time and study them and you’ll find they love building and being a part of a team. Soon you’ll find out all these legends have a team, an incredible support system, and they don’t do it alone.

5. You can’t ever sell your business

In most entrepreneurs’ minds, the idea of selling isn’t there until decades after starting the business. But, it’s something that if given the opportunity most of us would do.

Related: Why Partnerships Will Make Or Break Your Business

Even if you wouldn’t sell your business, isn’t nice to know that if you wanted you could take your business and get paid one lump sum equaling years of work?

Or if you don’t want to sell your business, maybe you want to step out of business but collect payments and keep it in the family – well, if you’re a solopreneur it’s tough to ever to work yourself out of a job.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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Are You Suited to Entrepreneurship

Start This Business With Zero Advertising Budget And No Need For Premises

What do we need to do to make our chances of entrepreneurial success as high as possible? Is it possible to build and position a business that has the highest statistical chances of survival? How would we even go about building such a business? Financial Freedom Project seems to have the answer.

Financial Freedom Project

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What are the causes of most business failures?

When it comes to business failure in South Africa, the numbers aren’t optimistic. Some of the more common reasons for business failure include:

  • Start-up funding
  • Ongoing support
  • Lack of new business to sustain growth
  • Admin time / costs associated with running a business
  • High cost of equipment / premises
  • Advertising budget
  • Cost of personnel labor
  • Legalities of employment contracts
  • Costs of credit
  • Market experience
  • Competition within the industry
  • Current market conditions.

With the odds stacked against you, what type of business could you start that offers you:

1. Minimal start-up funding

Consider minimal start-up funding requirements to mitigate as much risk as possible and make start-up as easy and quick as possible.

We need to go as low as less than one month of one month’s average salary as so to be able to start this business on the spot. Let’s make our criteria less than R10 000.

Related: 15 Things Every Newbie Needs to Know About Starting a Business

2. Mentor/ Trainer support

For support and experience we need to have easily accessible communication methods with a mentor / trainer i.e. WhatsApp and skype.

3. Access to a market full of customers with unlimited spending ability

Want a colossal market, how about an estimated 5.3 Trillion Dollars a day?

4. No need for an advertising budget

Maybe a business where customers come to you without advertising because they want what you have. Let’s be ridiculous and put a zero advertising budget.

5. Minimum paper work / admin requirements before and after sales

Let’s aim for no admin and have everything processed and stored online for absolute minimal ongoing costs.

6. No premises required

You can work from anywhere at minimal cost and only need one computer.

Related: Why Build a Business Just to Close It?

7. No employees required

This business must be able to run as a “one man show” as to exclude all labor costs and employment legalities. As in previous point, let’s aim for one person to run this business and internet to stay connected to the world.

8. Little competition

This industry offers the least possible competition between participants.

9. A industry with no “seasonal times” so you can make money all the time

To get a never ending supply of opportunity we absolutely have to be a part of the global supply and demand system.

10. A proven concept

This will be outlined below.

What’s the business?

Financial Freedom Project provides you with a long-term financial freedom by utilising financial markets. The Financial Freedom Project is a results-based wealth creation training and mentorship programme that has start-up capital requirements of only R4 000 to begin accessing markets.  The course requires only 3 days of your time and offers unlimited course re-sits.

For more information about how you can work with Financial Freedom Project visit financialfreedomproject.net or call them on 010 020 5699 for further info.

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Are You Suited to Entrepreneurship

BrightRock’s 5 Entrepreneurial Tips For Start-ups

Schalk Malan, co-founder and executive director, shares five tips that he says were instrumental to BrightRock’s success thus far.

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After six years in business, needs-matched life insurance player BrightRock is widely regarded as the fastest growing player in its segment. By the end of 2017, they have achieved an annualised premium income of of over R1.1 billion and a year-on-year growth of 62%, relative to the industry’s growth of 8%. Schalk Malan, co-founder and executive director, shares five tips that he says were instrumental to BrightRock’s success thus far:

1. Get the right people together

It all starts with a shared goal to make a difference – in our instance, we shared a vision to change the life insurance industry through a unique, needs-matched product that would make BrightRock stand out from the crowd. We ensure that this vision is embedded in the actions of each and every one of our employees by encouraging a collaborative and entrepreneurial spirit, which in turn continues to enable us to drive the business forward.

Related: How BrightRock Is Rocking The (Industry) Boat In Only 5 Years Since Launch

2. Always put your clients’ interests first or build products that really create value for your clients

We put clients’ interests first by designing a product that tracks the changes in clients’ financial needs over time, so they pay only for the cover they actually need. It’s more cost-efficient and sustainable, because we strip out wasted cover to deliver premium savings. In doing so, we also create more value for our clients. But it’s not just the product that puts clients’ interests first:

By communicating our cover in simple, plain language without intricate terminology and clauses, our clients are empowered to understand what they signed up for. This principle of client-centric design can be applied in any business.

3. Play on a differentiated playing field >>> Stand out from the crowd, create your own niche

BrightRock operates in a competitive and well-established market, so we understood we couldn’t compete if we simply did things the way they’d always been done. We created our own playing field with new rules, where we differentiate what we do in every facet of our business. This is done on various levels – from our highly advanced product and systems architecture; to having the best claims definitions in the market; to offering a high touch; personal claims experience; personalised documentation; various initiatives offering support for independent financial advice; to our content-led consumer marketing strategy.

Related: Bright Futures

4. There will be twists and turns, no new business perfectly follows the original business plan

Any successful entrepreneur will tell you that you will need to constantly adapt and make changes to your business plan to stay at the top of your game. This needs to be done without compromising on the reasons why you started your business. One of many examples of this in the BrightRock story is that we originally had envisaged a Johannesburg-based head office. These days, we have a large contingent of our staff based in Port Elizabeth – delivering cost efficiencies and service improvement to our servicing model, much to the benefit of our clients.

5. Never give up

In the beginning of any new venture, it is hard because many people doubt you. We were told we were nuts to leave successful careers to start something new and take on the big boys. That doubt can be crippling if you let it be. You’re constantly watching the cash flow and new business numbers and need to recruit and motivate people based on a promise of what the business will become. There will be many sleepless nights and dark-hours-of-the-morning butterflies-in-the-stomach, but just keep going – your perseverance will eventually pay off.

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