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How Small Businesses Can Give Back Without Breaking The Bank

If you are not sure how to start giving back, below are some top tips on how to do just that… without breaking the bank.

Amy Galbraith

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As a small business owner, you might think that charitable giving is impossible on your small budget. But, this is not true. You can donate to a charity or contribute to a fundraiser, even if you have a startup or small business budget. You just have to be creative about it.

In today’s world, more and more consumers care deeply about social causes, which means that you need to seek ways to incorporate giving back into your business strategy. If you are not sure how to start giving back, below are some top tips on how to do just that… without breaking the bank.

Encourage your team to volunteer

You will see many calls from charities, such as MSF, to donate time and resources. One way to give back without breaking the bank is by encouraging your team to volunteer and offering paid time off as an incentive for them to volunteer at a charity.

You can give your employees a specific amount of time each month or quarter for volunteer work, and you will soon notice morale improving. It will also increase your community involvement and visibility in your community. You will have to ask your team which days they would prefer to volunteer, as many people might prefer the weekend over a Monday or other weekday.

Related: The Importance Of Being Organised For Your Start-up

Use your talents

Giving back does not always have to mean making a monetary donation. You can use the talents of the people in your business to give back to clients, or you can offer your services pro bono to charities that could use them.

For example, if you are a marketing agency, you can offer to upgrade a charity’s website or write content for their social media pages. If you are a financial business, offer a free day of accounting services to a charity that desperately needs some bookkeeping help.

Using your talents costs you nothing but can help to make a significant impact on the cause that is closest to your heart.

Set up a collection jar in the office

If you have chosen a charity, such as MSF to donate to, it can be difficult to find the funds in a small business. A simple but effective way to collect some funds is to set up a collection jar in the office for employees to contribute to.

Be sure that your collection jar is placed in a high traffic area of the office, such as in the kitchen or on the way to the coffee machine. You can make it fun by running a competition of who can donate the most and offering a prize, or you could ask those who bring in their own lunches to donate what they would have spent on purchasing a lunch that day. Be sure that your staff never feel forced into giving a large amount of money, but remind them the jar is for a good cause.

Launch a charity drive

If money and time are in short supply in your small business, you can still give back by launching a charity drive. You can collect anything from books and clothes for children, tinned food and bedding for an animal shelter or even tinned goods for a soup kitchen.

Be sure to choose a charity that everyone in your office agrees with supporting, otherwise it will be difficult to encourage everyone to take part. Take it one step further and ask your local community to contribute to your charity drive. Set up a place in your office where people can drop items off and offer them a thank you card or note so that they feel appreciated. Make posts on your social media platforms before, during and after the drive, and ensure that you share photographs of your company donating the goods to your chosen charity.

Related: How Entrepreneurs Can Make Good Decisions Quickly

Use your voice

If you know about a cause, such as the outbreak of Ebola in the DRC in 2017, then as a business you can use your voice to make people aware of it. You can create a social media campaign for a charity or join in their advocacy, lobbying, letter writing, and other efforts.

By adding your voice to theirs, their cause becomes louder and it is likely that more people will be interested in donating to them. For example, you could set up a Facebook page for your local animal shelter and create informative posts about pet health for their followers to share. Or you could post blogs to your company website detailing the needs of a local homeless shelter and how people can help them.

Be creative

You do not have to stick with monetary donations when helping a charity, although these are much appreciated. You can look for creative ways to give back without breaking the bank. As a small business, it is important to build your presence with consumers, and helping a charity is an effective way to do so.

You can encourage your team to volunteer, use your skills to help your chosen cause or you could set up a collection jar in the office. Whatever you choose to do, make sure it is creative and in line with what your employees can achieve.

Amy Galbraith is a junior writer at Rogerwilco. She has had a passion for professional writing since graduating from the University of KwaZulu-Natal with a Masters degree in English Literature. She now writes compelling copy for an exciting variety of clients, and enjoys writing on topics including education, finance and millennial issues.

Small Business

Is Unmanaged Stress Killing Off Our SMMEs?

Most SMMEs don’t make it past their first year. This is worrying for an economy in which SMMEs are a vital part of growth. A range of reasons are given for what is stifling these businesses, from financing to access to markets, but one factor has been completely overlooked: Stress.

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It is now widely understood that Small Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) are key to a country’s economic- and employment growth, but something is amiss in South Africa. Our SMMEs are just not doing what they should and understanding why this is – and fixing it – will be critical to the future success and sustainability of the economy.

The common conversations around SMME failure rates point at six main culprits: (1) access to funding, (2) access to markets, (3) infrastructure challenges, (4) scalability, (5) tough regulations, and (6) skills/education. The problem is that we have known about these for years, and for all the efforts to address them, we are unfortunately not seeing the growth in the sector that is needed.

A recent survey by the Small Business Institute (SBI) and the Small Business Project (SBP) put the number of formal SMMEs in South Africa currently at just 250,000. These numbers are alarmingly low – especially when compared with international benchmarks. SMMEs in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, make up 95% of businesses, and employ between 60%–70% of the working population, contributing up to 60% to GDP. In South Africa, while SMMEs make up 98% of the business population, they only employ 28% of the nation’s workforce, according to Chris Darroll, CEO of the SBP.

Related: Why Stress Can Actually Be Good For You

And yet the government continues to pin its hopes on the SMME sector. Initiatives like the DTI’s Invest SA and the South African Investment Conference this October, that claims to have attracted billions in foreign investment to the country, have foregrounded the role of SMMEs in economic revival. And the Government’s National Development Plan aims to have SMMEs contributing 90% of job growth by 2030. It is likely that more money will be channelled into support for the sector, to join the billions that have already been spent on incubators and initiatives to help small businesses.

This is a good thing, but it is not enough. The numbers speak for themselves. To date, none of these initiatives has borne much fruit and this signals that we may be overlooking something fundamental. Our collaborative research at the UCT Graduate School of Business suggests that what is being overlooked is something that most of us find difficult to define, or even talk about: Stress.

Stress is under-acknowledged by most people, personally and professionally, and for varied reasons. And this can have devastating effects. If ignored in business, the human devastation is likely to have larger scale effects on job loss, workforce disengagement, health-related days off, impaired teamwork, sub-optimal decision-making, lowering of productivity, and ultimately fuelling a declining economy.

While access to finance and markets, infrastructure and scalability challenges, tough regulations, and not enough educated and skilled employees are all valid hurdles tripping up SMMEs, the fact is that they are perfectly normal hurdles to have in a competitive, emerging economy. Our research reveals that good leaders, who are able to get their businesses over each encountered hurdle, are also able to manage their personal negative stress and harness their positive stress.

Related: A Brain Surgeon’s Tips For Handling Stress Head-On

Stress can, generally, be quite motivating, however it is generally accepted that there are three kinds of stress: (1) positive stress, which is chosen and does not last very long (like writing an exam), (2) tolerable stress, which is unexpected and lasts a little longer, but then stops and there is time to process, and (3) toxic stress or distress. Toxic stress is tolerable stress left to run on and on without end, without rest and without time for healing and processing. It is this third and debilitating kind of stress that business leaders are likely to experience, and in SMMEs it can be even more severe.

Our research suggests that SMME owners tend to set very high, and often lofty, goals for themselves when setting up their SMMEs. And then they are constantly feeling stretched in either striving for these goals or ‘maintaining the course’. This can mean maintaining good business results, maintaining the customer base, where often 20% of the customer base accounts for 80% of the revenue, maintaining employment levels in changing political and economic conditions, maintaining pricing when squeezed for ever-lower prices while delivering good quality products and services, having their integrity challenged, and dealing with clients/customers who are not averse to replacing their products/services.

Another cause of stress for SMME business owners is that they mostly have internal loci of control, meaning that they take personal responsibility for outcomes and results and therefore blame themselves for every failure, and find it difficult to forgive themselves for deviations from intended results. In addition, an innate sense of accountability to their staff and their staffs’ families reportedly weighs heavily on business owners. Many feel similar accountability toward the broader stakeholder groups that their businesses serve.

All of these factors, which many argue are innate to the nature of business, place undue, long-term pressure (toxic stress/distress) on the cognitive, emotional, psychological and spiritual resources of individual business owners. This reportedly leads to drops in productive activity and motivation, withdrawal from relationships both personal and professional, low energy, impaired decision-making and ill health. And it also destroys resilience – leaving business leaders unable to ‘bounce back’ from personal- or business-setbacks, which is part and parcel of life and business. With a debilitated leader, the business is almost always likely to suffer, on a day-to-day basis and also in the long run. Like a virus, stress transfers to others.

An SMME’s success is inextricably linked to having an effective leader. And effective leadership is inextricably linked to effective stress management and self-care. It stands to reason, therefore, that improving the way SMME business owners manage their stress and boundaries could have a significant impact on improving business survival rates.

Related: Is Your Business Prepared For The Worst? How You Can Stress-Test Your Business

Along with offering business advice, funding incubators, opening up markets, attracting foreign investors, educating consumers, subsidising and improving infrastructure, the government should be looking at ways to encourage stress management and self-care into the daily operations of small to medium-sized businesses.

We need to get business owners educated about stress and self-care: about how exercise, sleep, diet, meditation, life-balance, self-forgiveness, and other-forgiveness affect them, their staff and their businesses. Effective self-care, of which stress management is a part, will enable business owners to courageously stay resilient in the ongoing stressful situations they will naturally encounter. This may, in turn, help to turn the tide in South Africa’s SMME sector so that it can drive the country’s economic revival like everyone hopes it will.

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Many SMEs Start With Great Plans But Fail To Take The Big Leap

Most small-to-medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are aware of the benefits of good governance practice but, faced with limited time and resources, which could be costly in supporting growth ambitions.

ACCA

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  • 27% of SMEs don’t have a vision that covers more than the next 12 months
  • 45% of SMEs either don’t have a strategy, or one which covers only the next 12 months or less. 

The latest global research, inclusive of Africa in supporting small business growth from ACCA, outlines the governance needs of SMEs. It highlights simple but effective practice over vision, strategy and human capital can provide them with greater flexibility, adaptability and resilience as they grow. This a huge factor in the long-term sustainability of the business, if put in practise.

“If you incorporate good practice for running your business from an early stage, your company is more likely to be resilient and is more likely to appeal to external investment,” explains Jo Iwasaki, head of corporate governance at ACCA. It is about leadership directing the company and being aware of factors both within and beyond their enterprise and build resilient organisations in the face pf the changing world.

Related: Growing Globally – Supporting SMEs On The International Stage

The research also found that half (49%) of SMEs do not involve anyone external in their strategy discussions, despite the benefits experienced by those that do, which include additional experience and knowledge of the industry/sector (according to 46%), an independent perspective / constructive criticism (44%) and advice on their growth strategy (39%).

“There are a lot of daily concerns for the leaders of a small business, and often the biggest challenge is meeting day-to-day operations and cash management needs while thinking about the long-term future of the company. And while many leaders are keenly aware of the importance of resilience in the rapidly changing business environment and of buy-in from stakeholders, for example funders and employees, there often may not be the time to think or do much about it,” added Iwasaki.

“I hope that this research helps SMEs in focusing on some of the most crucial issues, and can be a resource not just to SMEs themselves but also to policymakers,” concluded Iwasaki.

How vision and strategy helps small business succeed is available at ACCA Global.

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Small Business

Small Business Owner? All The Documents You Need To Get A Car

Read on below for some tips on all the documents you need to get a car as a small business owner.

Amy Galbraith

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As a small business owner, transport is an important aspect of your financial success. You need to be able to drive to and from meetings so that you arrive on time, as well as have the ability to transport your products to customers and to your store.

You will need to purchase a car for your small business to make life easier and more efficient. Once you have used a car repayments calculator in South Africa, you will need to gather all the necessary documents together in order to make a purchase. Not sure what those documents are? Read on below for some tips on all the documents you need to get a car as a small business owner.

A business plan

A business plan is necessary for the financial institution as it will show them how your business is doing financially and whether or not you will be able to repay them on time and in full. Your business plan should be detailed and provide a financial breakdown of your business at its current point in time.

Having a business plan will also show the financial institution that you are serious about your commitment to repaying your car loan. Being transparent with them will work in your favour and allow them to see the progression of your business with the use of your new vehicle. You will need to carefully outline how you will repay the car and what you will do if you are unable to make the repayments.

Related: Keep It Simple: How To Write A One Page Business Plan

Ownership

One of the most important documents you will need to provide the lender with is proof that you are the owner or part-owner of the business. You will need to turn in the correct documents that correlate to your business, such as a partnership agreement, limited liability company documents or a business licence.

In some cases, you can simply provide your lender with your personal information and the information of your business. You will need to provide the tax identification number of your business too. The ownership documents are important, as they differentiate the purchase from being a personal one to being one for a business.

Be sure to have these documents ready, and make copies in case you should misplace anything.

Personal information

You will need to provide the lender will all the necessary personal information. This includes a copy of your identity document, the most recent three month’s worth of bank statements for your business as proof of your ability to repay the debt, as well as proof of business and residential address.

If you are the sole proprietor, the financial institution or lender will need these documents because you and your business are seen as one in the same. This means that they need to look at the income from your business and both your business and personal expenses when calculating your affordability. You can use a car repayments calculator in South Africa to do the legwork and figure out your affordability before the financial institution does but their results might differ.

Driver’s licence of the regular driver

If you are going to be driving the car regularly, then you will need to provide the financial institution or lender with a copy of your driver’s licence. However, if you will be allowing your staff to use the company car, then you will need to provide both a copy of your licence and theirs, in order to add them to the insurance as a regular driver.

Providing a copy of the driver’s licence of everyone who will be driving the company car will allow your insurance company to add them as regular drivers. It is also important for your financial institution to know how and how often the car will be used, as this will influence their approval decision. Be sure that whoever you list as a regular driver is trustworthy and will drive responsibly in order to limit the amount of wear and tear on your business vehicle.

Related: How South African Small Business Owners Can Overcome Economic Uncertainty

Proof of insurance

Once you have settled on the perfect car for your needs, before the car can be delivered you will need to provide the lender with proof of insurance. This is necessary as the financial institution or lender needs to be assured that the car will be insured against anything that might happen to it while en route to your business.

You should look for car insurance that offers affordable premiums and that is tailored to company cars rather than cars for personal use. The proof of insurance should have the details of all regular drivers listed, so that your lender has a comprehensive list of everyone who will be using the car, and should clearly state what is and is not covered. Be sure to make a few copies of this document for the drivers to keep for themselves in case they have any queries or need to make a claim at some point.

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