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Internet Solutions: Ronnie Apteker

Frenetic, intelligent, eccentric. These are some of the words used to describe South Africa’s youthful Internet pioneer Ronnie Apteker. Becoming a millionaire many times over has given the Internet Solutions founder the freedom to experiment.

Monique Verduyn

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Ronnie Apteker of Internet Solutions

The year was 1993. Schindler’s List was showing in cinemas, humans were cloned for the first time, the European Union was formally established and at CERN, just west of Geneva, the birth of the World Wide Web was announced.

In Johannesburg Ronnie Apteker and Thomas McWalter, two Wits University graduates, were dabbling with the Net and discovering how easy it was to access real time solutions to IT problems. The Internet was being used largely by academics to swap documents but Apteker believed it would become an important business tool. He began persuading South African companies to incorporate it into their business systems, and thus Internet Solutions was born. In 1994, Apteker graduated cum laude with an MSc in Computer Science. Technically, he and McWalter excelled, with Apteker’s knowledge and selling skills opening doors for him all the way. But their debt was rising, so Alon Apteker and David Frankel were brought in to turn the finances around. The company focused single-mindedly on providing corporate customers with Internet access, a factor which enabled IS to dominate the market from the beginning.

In 1996, when most organisations were embracing the concept of the corporate website, IS needed to grow, and it required the finance to do so. A deal was concluded with networking giant Dimension Data, which bought 25% of IS. One year later, Dimension Data bought the remaining 75% of the company, paying its directors Apteker, his brother Alon, David Frankel, Thomas McWalter and Andras Salamon R300 million. Today, IS provides e-business services to more than 80% of South Africa’s top 250 listed companies and has over 4 500 customers.

Entrepreneur: What was your vision for Internet Solutions?
RA: At that tender age we did not have a sense of purpose, but we wanted to do something magical with computers. We were involved with corporates from the start, but we first focused on dial-up home users. After six months we realised that we wanted a people-oriented business and you don’t get close to people when you have a mass consumer business like a dial-up Internet service provider (ISP). With corporates we could grow relationships and we could invest time and resources in building things like online banking, reservation systems, media archiving, payment gateways and complex security solutions.

E: How did you identify the market opportunity?
RA: It wasn’t so much about identifying the opportunity as it was about doing what we loved. We were crazy about technology and we knew the Internet would be something everyone would want to explore.    

E: How did you finance the company?
RA: We used furniture from home, our own computers and whatever we had lying around to set up the office. It was a tight and humble operation and didn’t need too much money to start. The biggest cost was the fixed line infrastructure from Telkom. Fortunately, Telkom supplies a service and only bills you months later which helped us from a cash flow perspective. Start-up finance for a new venture is largely about attitude. You can start a new business in your garage, or you can sign a five-year lease in some fancy building in Sandton and before you know you will be in the hole for a small fortune. Having fancy offices doesn’t make a company better.

E: What were the most difficult obstacles you faced as a start-up?
RA: We were all very young and didn’t know what it meant to lead people. As we grew we started getting older people on board who had more world and work experience and who were more set in their ways. The biggest challenge was to align everyone. On the business side, there was competition all around us. We had to be smarter than the rest, and we had to work harder to carve out more market share. And that we did. IS is still the dominant corporate service provider by far. The company’s culture plays a central role in this. There is a drive and a determination that goes back to the issue of alignment and purpose. We wanted to win, all the time. Complacency will kill any business and as a bunch of young leaders we were never satisfied. We always tried to stretch ourselves, month on month, and we never took “no” for an answer. This, coupled with chutzpah, a sense of humour, a love for technology and some sharp skills made for a selling and marketing tour de force.

E: Can you identify what your big break was?
RA: Our big breaks came from our first few customers who included Price Forbes (now known as Alexander Forbes), Sasol, Times Media (Johnnic), Q-Data, The Argus Group (Independent Group), ICL, IBM, Sybase and a host of others. As the virtual online community grew so we formed a critical mass of Internet users. Also, our timing was really good. We were there from the start of the global Internet phenomenon. Many people say we all got lucky, and yes, we all admit that we were there at the right time, with the right people. But luck did not make the venture work. Making IS work was about hard work, sacrifice and risk taking. There was competition all around us. We were selling people on e-mail, but, who were they going to e-mail? Well, I volunteered for the job. Yes, every time we got a new customer up and running, the majority of emails they would send and receive would be to and from their new IS friends. And so the online community grew.

E: How did you build your client base?
RA: We were relentless. We knocked on every door we could find. We also asked our customers to help us. We learnt that happy clients multiply. I remember in the early days asking a customer if they were happy. When their face lit up I would then ask them if they would help us get more customers. All corporates have partners: auditors, IT providers, advertising agents, furniture suppliers, landlords, bankers. We made it our mission to connect everyone in the chain, and so the virtual network grew. When you love what you do it is not work any more. When you love your products and services it is not a sale any more. We were simply out there evangelising with anyone who would give us five minutes of their time.     

E ;What are your views on leadership?
RA: A key thing we learnt at IS was “who works for whom”. Leaders work for the people they serve, not the other way round. When you hire 10 people, it means you have to work 10 times harder to grow and inspire these people. And of course, your ultimate job is to develop them into future leaders. We went on many leadership courses and we sought enlightenment all the time. We learnt that leaders command respect, whereas bosses demand it. We learnt that leaders lead through goodwill, where as bosses lead through authority. We learnt to say “we” instead of “I”. Another key and fundamental element we embraced early on was how to have fun. It is important to celebrate victories. Remember to laugh, often. Having fun is the most important aspect of any venture. If you are not loving it then something is fundamentally wrong.


E: What was your key sales strategy?
RA: Selling is about listening. I am not a good listener so this was an interesting realisation for me. We learnt that the more we listened the more we would get business. I remember going to a presentation at Edgars over 10 years ago. The CEO there loved to talk. I was the guest speaker at their corporate lunch. After a minute of my presentation I said “Sir, I would be more interested to hear your views on how you see the Internet playing a role at Edgars.” He perked up and started going on and on. After an hour he said that was the best presentation he had ever been to. I had hardly said a word, but while he spoke I wrote it all down. When we sent our proposal, they said that we seemed to know so much about their business and their strategic direction – of course we did, the CEO told us everything.

E: What is the most important lesson you have learnt about sales?
RA: If you are waiting to close a deal and it is not happening then one way to find out what the problem is, is to ask the customer “What do we need to do to get your business?” But then, also offer that prospective customer a set of answers, like a multiple choice exam. There are a bunch of reasons there could be a hold up. Perhaps they can’t afford the service. Or perhaps their budget cycle is six months away and they can only commit the funds then. Or perhaps the guy you are selling to needs to get sign off from the board. Yes, there are a bunch of common reasons that generally strike a chord when trying to close a deal. Then there is one big fundamental question: does the person you are selling to like and trust you? If you don’t know that answer then all bets are off.

E: What was your marketing strategy?
RA: Like our selling strategy, it was relentless. When we started IS we never had big budgets to spend on marketing so we had to be as vocal with limited resources. What emerged was a creative culture. The Internet was an intriguing place in the early 90s. We would get calls from people asking us why “they should Internet”. We weren’t selling IS as much as were selling the benefits behind networking technology in general.

E: How did you differentiate your marketing?
RA: We learnt to become story tellers. The more we made people feel comfortable, the more we established trust, and the more we did that the more the business grew. People were afraid of this new technology and what it would mean to their business. So we made them laugh. And we told them colourful anecdotes about people who would call us up and tell us that they wanted to buy the Internet. I have a friend whose husband thought he had broken the Internet. I remember people asking Dave Frankel and me for discounts. And we would say “I’m going to have to check with the board.” What we didn’t tell them was that we were the board. Of course, the board always said no. Paul Harris once told us that when they started RCI (Rand Consolidated Investments) they would call people and say “We are calling you from our Johannesburg office.” What they didn’t say is that there weren’t any other offices. The name of the company was also a big bonus. When Time magazine ran the first big Internet story at the start of 1994, with the word “Internet” in big letters on the cover, a lot of people thought they were writing about us.

E: What was your growth strategy and what it is now?
RA: When I was at the helm our growth strategy was to work seven days a week until we collapsed. We continually tried to find new leaders and we always empowered people to make their own decisions. In effect, my task was to work myself out of a job. I have done this quite a few times now in my life. Now I am quite removed from the running of IS. I am there helping out on a few ventures and cultural activities. The company is stronger than ever and the CEO, Gus MacRobert, is the greatest guy, with the biggest heart. The business is in a new and inspiring chapter in its history.

E: How do you develop your knowledge and skills?
RA: You learn by listening. I have developed my knowledge and acquired new skills by spending time with inspired people. A mentor is always an asset. I have been very privileged in my life to have had some humble and brilliant mentors share their wisdom with me. At IS we also bought a lot of books – on leadership, values, purpose, business, you name it. We loved sharing and swapping books. We also would organise a lot of team building events where people went on leadership courses. We were always looking to be provoked.

E: What have been the key elements of your success over the years?
RA: Investing in people. Empowering people. Growing people. Trusting people. Listening to people. From the first day we were aligned. The original team were aware of their individual strengths and weaknesses. Entrepreneurs always surround themselves with good people. We never had to meet and have long discussions. We met to celebrate, to brainstorm and to discuss challenges and obstacles, but we never wasted time with politics and power struggles. There was a healthy respect for each other and there was a common set of values which bound everyone together. We also learnt early on about money and motivation. A motivated person is someone who is enthusiastic, happy, passionate, thrilled, excited, energised and inspired. Imagine I ask you to wake up tomorrow morning at 4:00am and to come to my house to clean my driveway. Imagine it is the middle of winter and I will be fast asleep as you do this uninteresting task. Would you be excited or enthusiastic? Would you be inspired or passionate? Of course you wouldn’t. Even if I paid you a million rand, you would do it in a flash, but you still wouldn’t be motivated. Money moves people, but it doesn’t motivate them.


How do you define innovation?
Innovation is about attitude.
It’s about changing the way we think.
It’s an emotional construct.
Innovation is about taking risks, and doing what is in your heart.
Innovative ventures involve the most fundamental things we know: chicken, soft drinks, fashion, watches, music systems.

Making movies
Someone once asked Ronnie Apteker how to make a small fortune in the movie business. He replied: “Start off with a big fortune.” He has spent over R80 million on films in the last seven years. Apteker pumped a significant amount of money into Purpose, the first film he produced, in 2002. In South Africa it earned R175 000, although it did earn much more around the world for its distributor. A movie set during the height of the dotcom boom, it has been said to reflect his own life. In 2005, he put $400 000 into the horror flick Reeker. That year also saw the release of teen flick Crazy Monkey, Straight Outta Benoni, a film which Apteker acknowledges was not to everyone’s taste.  The budget for that was R8 million and it made around R3 million at the box office. His latest venture, Footskating 101, had a budget of just R1 million and is said to have achieved the quirkiness Apteker and co were trying to capture in Crazy Monkey. It’s due for release next year.

The business of making a film can be a lot of fun, but that of selling it is another story altogether, Apteker says. “I stay motivated because I am still inspired, still excited, still enthusiastic. But I often get anxious about the money side of things.” He says, however, that his experience in the industry is starting to pay off;  for  the first time, he is making a return on his investment in Reeker. He’s had a lot to say about the local movie industry and its shortcomings, so it will be interesting to see what comes out of his stable next.

What is your key advice to anyone seeking to start a business?

  • Having a good idea helps, but starting a business is all about investing in good people. I would rather invest in a bad business with good people, than in a good business with bad people. Arrogant, lazy, obnoxious people can take the best plans and mess them up. But good, humble, enthusiastic, honest people can take the most arbitrary plan and bring you joy
  • Don’t ever abandon your sense of judgment. If something is not feeling right then you can place a bet that something is going to go wrong. We all suffer from pride; we all tell ourselves things like “the train has left the station”. Rather pull the plug on something before the wheels come off
  • Always stick to the fundamentals
  • Mean what you say, and say what you mean
  • Be tough minded, but don’t be hard hearted. Make small decisions with your head and big decisions with your heart
  • Listen, and you will learn
  • Always remember, luck favours the persistent

Apteker vottles the classifieds market

It was American computer scientist Vinton Cerf who said: “By placing intelligence at the edges rather than control in the middle of the network, the Internet has created a platform for innovation.” Ronnie Apteker continues to take advantage of that platform with his new concept, The Vottle Project. A free Internet service that allows people to interact via a virtual marketplace, it enables users to buy and sell goods and services, to engage on a social level, and to promote local arts and culture. Vottle also includes a crime watch facility where people can report on criminal acts in their areas. “We were inspired by Craigslist in America and we are trying to establish an online community here in South Africa where people can interact, socialise, and trade,” says Apteker. “Our goal is to build critical mass over time and then roll out further enhancements and value added services. If we ever do build that mass we will be in a strong position to leverage this for further online business activities.”

Craigslist is a network of online urban communities featuring free classified advertisements. It was founded in 1995 by Craig Newmark in San Francisco. By June 2006, Craigslist had established itself in approximately 310 cities across the globe. Its sole source of revenue is paid job ads in select cities, and paid broker apartment listings in New York City. Apteker says the online classifieds space is one of the fastest growing areas of the Internet. In South Africa there are almost a dozen websites focused on second hand goods. Vottle recently introduced a payment facility that allows eBucks members to pay with eBucks currency. “This is the first facility of its kind in South Africa,” says Apteker. “With Vottle we can now test and perfect micro payment solutions.” This in itself is an important development for the local market. Micro payments are means for transferring small amounts of money electronically. Since it is not practical – or cost-effective – for individual users to charge small amounts of money to a major credit card, this method of payment is needed for sites like Vottle where low-cost items are traded. It’s worth noting that Craigslist serves over five billion page views per month. Although the company does not disclose financial information, it is speculated that its annual revenue approached $10 million in 2004.

Monique Verduyn is a freelance writer. She has more than 12 years’ experience in writing for the corporate, SME, IT and entertainment sectors, and has interviewed many of South Africa’s most prominent business leaders and thinkers. Find her on Google+.

Entrepreneur Profiles

6 Lesson Gems From Appanna Ganapathy That Helped Him Launch A High-Growth Start-Up

Twenty years after first wanting to own a business, Appanna Ganapathy launched ART Technologies, a business he aims to grow throughout Africa, starting with Kenya thanks to a recently signed deal with Seacom. As a high-growth entrepreneur with big plans, Appanna spent two decades laying the foundations of success — and now he’s starting to collect.

Nadine Todd

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appanna-ganapathy

Vital Stats

Like many entrepreneurs before him, Appanna Ganapathy hadn’t even finished school and he was already thinking about his first business venture. A friend could secure the licensing rights to open Nando’s franchises in Mozambique, and they were very keen on the idea — which Appanna’s mom quickly dampened. “You can do whatever you want,” she said. “As long as you finish your degree first.”

Unlike many other entrepreneurs however, Appanna not only finished his degree, but realised that he had a lot of skills he needed to develop and lessons to learn before he’d be ready to launch the business he wanted.

“We launched ART Technologies just over two years ago. If I had started any earlier, I don’t think I would have been as successful as I am now,” he says.

Here are six key lessons that Appanna has learnt along his journey, which have allowed him to launch a high-growth start-up that is positioned to make an impact across Africa.

1. You don’t just need a product – you need clients as well

Business success is the ability to design and execute a great product and solution, and then be able to sell it. Without sales, there is no business. This is a lesson Appanna learnt while he was still at university.

“I was drawn to computers. I loved figuring out how they worked, playing computer games — everything about them,” he says. “My parents lived in Mozambique, and during my holidays I’d visit them and a friend who had a computer business. I helped him assemble them and thought I could do this too while I was studying. I convinced my dad to buy me a car so that I could set up my business — and never sold or assembled a single computer. I delivered pizzas instead.”

So, what went wrong? The simple truth was that at the time Appanna had the technical skills to build computers, but he lacked the ability to sell his product.

“If someone had said, ‘I’ve got an order for 30 computers’, I would have filled it — but to go out and get that order — I didn’t really even know where to start.”

2. Price and solution go hand-in-hand

As much as you need the ability to sell your solution, you also need a market that wants and needs what you’re offering, at a price point that works for everyone.

In 2007, Appanna was approached by a former supplier whom he had worked with while he was based in Mozambique. The supplier had an IT firm and he wanted to expand into South Africa. He was looking for a local partner who would purchase equity shares in the company and run the South African business.

“I loved the opportunity. This was something I could build from the ground up, in an area I understood well,” says Appanna. The firm set up and managed IT infrastructure for SMEs. The value proposition was simple: “We could offer SMEs a service that they could use for a relatively low cost, but that gave them everything an enterprise would have.”

The problem was that although Appanna and his team knew they had a great product, they were competing on price with inferior products. “If we couldn’t adequately unpack the value of our solution, an SME would choose the cheaper option. It was a big lesson for me to learn. It doesn’t matter how good the solution is that you’re offering — if it’s not at a price point that your target market accepts, they won’t choose you.”

It was this understanding that helped Appanna and his team develop the Desktop-as-a-Service solution that ART Technologies now offers the SME market.

“While I was developing the idea and the solution, I needed to take three key things into account: What do SMEs need from an IT infrastructure perspective, what is the most cost-effective way to offer them that solution, and what will the market pay (and is it enough to cover our costs and give us a small profit margin)?”

Appanna’s experience in the market had already taught him how cost-conscious SMEs are, and so he started developing a solution that could deliver value at a price point SMEs could accept. His solution? A unique Desktop-as-a-Service product that combines all the processing power and Microsoft products a business needs, without any capex outlay for servers or software.

“It’s a Cloud workstation that turns any device into a full Windows computer,” Appanna explains. “We hold the licences, and our clients just access our service. A set-up that would cost between R180 000 and R200 000 for 15 users is now available for R479 per user per month.”

It took Appanna and his partners time to build the solution, but they started with the price point in mind, which meant a solution could be designed that met their needs as well as the needs of the market.

“Too many businesses set everything up, invest in the solution, and then discover they can’t sell their product at the price point they need. My time in the market selling IT and infrastructure solutions gave me invaluable insights into what we needed to deliver on, and what we could realistically charge for our service.”

3. Get as much on-the-ground experience as you can

appanna-ganapathy-art-technologies

The time that Appanna spent building the IT firm he was a part-owner of was invaluable. “I started as a technical director before being promoted to GM and running the company for three and a half years. Those years were very, very important for me. They’re where I learnt everything about running a business.

“When I started, I was responsible for sales, but I didn’t have to actually go out and find clients, I just had to meet them, compile quotes and handle the installations. Everything I did was under the guidance of the company’s CEO, who was based in Mozambique. Being the guy who did everything was the best learning ground for me. It set me up for everything I’m doing today. In particular, I learnt how to approach and deal with people. Without people and clients your business is nothing.”

Appanna didn’t just learn by default — he actively worked to expand his understanding of all facets of the business. “At the time I wasn’t planning on leaving to launch my own business,” he says. “I was a shareholder and I wanted to grow that business. That meant understanding as much as possible about how everything worked. If there was something I wasn’t sure of — a process, the numbers, how something worked — I asked. I took personal responsibility for any errors and got involved in every aspect of the business, including areas that weren’t officially ‘my job’. I wanted to really grow and support the business.”

4. Stay focused

Interestingly, while the experience Appanna has accumulated throughout his career has allowed him to build a high-growth start-up, it also taught him the importance of not wearing too many hats as an entrepreneur.

“I’m glad I’ve had the experience of wearing multiple hats, because I’ve learnt so much, but I’ve also learnt that it’s important to pick a lane, not only in what you do as a business, but in the role you play within your business. I also race superbikes in the South African Kawasaki ZX-10 Cup; through this I have learnt how important it is to focus in the moment without distractions and this is a discipline I have brought into the business.”

“If you’re the leader of an organisation, you need to let things go. You can’t be everything to everyone. When I launched ART Technologies, I knew the key to growth would be the fact that although I’m technical, I wasn’t going to run the technical side of the business. I have strong technical partners whom I trust, and there is an escalation framework in place, from tech, to tech manager, to the CTO to me — I speak tech and I’m available, but my focus is on strategy and growth. I believe this is the biggest mistake that many start-ups make. If you’re wearing all the hats, who is looking at where you’re going? When you’re down in the trenches, doing everything, it’s impossible to see the bigger picture.”

Appanna chose his partners carefully with this goal in mind.

“All the partners play a very important role in the business. Ruaan Jacobs’s strength is in the technical expertise he brings to the business and Terry Naidoo’s strength is in the support services he provides to our clients. Terry is our technical manager. He has the most incredible relationship with our customers — everyone wants to work with Terry. But there’s a problem with that too — if we want to scale this business, Terry can’t be the technical point for all of our customers.

“As partners we have decided what our blueprint for service levels will be; this is based on the way Terry deals with clients and he is developing a technical manual that doesn’t only cover the tech side of the business, but how ART Technologies engages with its customers.

“Terry’s putting his essence down on paper — a step-by-step guide to how we do business. That’s how you build a service culture.”

5. Reputation, network and experience count

Many start-ups lack three crucial things when they launch: Their founders haven’t built up a large network, they don’t have a reputation in the market, and they lack experience. All three of these things can (and should) be addressed during start-up phase, but launching with all three can give the business a valuable boost.

Appanna learnt the value of networks at a young age. Born in India, he moved to Zambia with his family as a young child. From there he moved to Tanzania and then Mozambique, attending boarding school in Swaziland and KwaZulu Natal. At each new school, he was greeted by kids who had formed strong bonds.

“I made good friends in those years, but at each new school I recognised how important strong bonds are, particularly as the outsider.”

Appanna’s early career took him back to Mozambique, working with the UN and EY on various projects. When he moved to South Africa, as a non-citizen he connected with his old boss from the UN who offered him a position as information officer for the Regional Director’s team.

His next move would be to the tech company that he would run for just over three years — also the product of previous connections. “Who you know is important, but how you conduct yourself is even more so,” says Appanna. “If your reputation in the market place is good, people will want to do business with you.”

Appanna experienced this first hand when he left to launch his own business. “Some key clients wanted to move with me,” he says. “If I had brought them in it would have settled our business, but I said no to some key customers who hadn’t been mine. I wasn’t ethically comfortable taking them with me.”

One of those multinational clients approached Appanna again six months later, stating they were taking their business out to tender and that they were hoping ART Technologies would pitch for it. “Apart from the Desktop-as-a-Service product, we also provide managed IT services for clients, particularly larger enterprise clients. Due to the client going out on tender and requesting for us to participate, we pitched for the business and won. The relationship with this client has grown, allowing us to offer them some of our services that they are currently testing to implement throughout Africa.”

“I believe how we conduct ourselves is essential. You need your own personal code of ethics, and you need to live by it. Business — particularly in our environment — is built on trust. Our customers need to trust us with their data. Your reputation is key when it comes to trust.”

Interestingly, although Appanna and his team developed their product based on a specific price point, once that trust is built and a certain standard of service is delivered, customers will pay more.

6. Start smart and start lean

Appanna was able to launch ART Technologies with the savings he and his wife, Kate, had put aside. He reached a point where he had ideas he wanted to take to market, but he couldn’t get his current business partners to agree to them — and so setting up his own business became inevitable.

Although he was fortunate to have savings to bootstrap the business, it was essential for the business to be lean and start generating income as quickly as possible. This was achieved in a number of ways.

First, Appanna and Kate agreed on a start-up figure. They would not go beyond it. “We had a budget, and the business needed to make money before that budget was reached.” The runway Appanna gave himself was only six months — highly ambitious given the 18-month runway most start-ups need. “Other than my salary we broke even in month three, which actually extended our runway a bit,” says Appanna.

Appanna had a server that he used to start with, and purchased a second, bigger server four months later. He also launched another business one month before launching ART Technologies — ART Call Management, a virtual PA services business that needed a PABX system, some call centre technology and two employees.

“I’d been playing around with the idea for a while,” says Appanna. “We were focused on SMEs, and I started noticing other challenges they faced. A lot of entrepreneurs just have their cellphones, but they aren’t answering them as businesses — it’s not professional.

“In essence we sell minutes — for R295 you get 25 incoming calls and 50 minutes of transferred calls. We answer the phone as your receptionist, transfer calls and take messages. How you use your minutes is up to you. For example, if you supply the leads, we can cold call for you. ART Technologies uses the call management business as a reception service and to do all of our cold calling. It’s kept the business lean, but it’s also brought in an income that helped us with our runway.” In 2017 ART Call Management was selected as one of the top ten in the SAGE-702 Small Business Awards.

The only problem with almost simultaneously launching two businesses is focus. “It’s incredibly important to know where you’re putting your focus,” says Appanna. “The call management business has been essential to our overall strategy, but my focus has been pulled in different directions at times, and I need to be conscious of that. The most important thing for any start-up is to know exactly where your focus lies.”


Into Africa

Thanks to a distribution deal signed locally with First Distribution, ART Technologies was introduced to Seacom, which has available infrastructure in a data centre in Kenya.

“It’s a pay-per-client model that allows us to pay Seacom a percentage of every client we sign up,” says Appanna. “First Distribution will be our sales arm. They have a webstore and resellers, and we will be opening ART Kenya with a shareholder who knows the local market.”

From there, Appanna is looking to West Africa and Mauritius. “We have the product and the relationship with Seacom gives us the foothold we need to grow into East Africa.”

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Entrepreneur Profiles

Kid Entrepreneurs Who Have Already Built Successful Businesses (And How You Can Too)

All over the world kids are abandoning the traditional notion of choosing a career to pursue until retirement. Gen Z aren’t looking to become employable job-seekers, but creative innovators as emerging business owners.

Diana Albertyn

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Do kids have an advantage or disadvantage when it comes to starting and building a company? It depends on how you look it. Juggling school, friends, family and other aspects of childhood and adolescence comes with its own requirements, but perhaps this is the best age to start.

“Being an entrepreneur means having to learn, focus, and connect to people and these are all traits that are valuable throughout life. Learning this when you are young is especially crucial, and will set you up for success and to be more open to other opportunities,” says billionaire investor, Shark Tank personality and author Mark Cuban.

Here are some of the most successful kidpreneurs who have cashed in on their hobbies, interests and needs to start and grow million dollar businesses borne from passion and innovation:

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30 Top Influential SA Business Leaders

Learn from these South African titans of industry to guide you on your entrepreneurial journey to success.

Nicole Crampton

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Entrepreneurship is said to be the answer to South Africa’s unemployment challenges and slow growth, but to foster entrepreneurship we ideally need business leaders to impact grass root efforts. Business leadership is vital to improved confidence and growth. These three titans of global industry say:

  • “As we look ahead, leaders will be those who empower others.” – Bill Gates
  • “Leaders are also expected to work harder than those who report to them and always make sure that their needs are taken care of before yours.” – Elon Musk
  • “Management is about persuading people to do things they do not want to do, while leadership is about inspiring people to do things they never thought they could.” – Steve Jobs

Here are 30 top influential SA business leaders forging the path towards a prosperous South African future.

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