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Nestlife: Vusi Sithole

In 1996 Vusi Sithole was the chairman of a subsidiary of Hollard. He had worked his way up the ranks of the insurance industry and was earning an executive’s salary, with further advancement on the horizon.

Nadine Todd

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Vusi Sithole

The story of Nestlife Assurance’s founder, Vusi Sithole, is one of perseverance, determination and the willingness of one man to create a legacy not only for himself, but also future generations of South Africans. Vusi Sithole is not shy about his opinion on the value of working hard. His company was not built on the back of BEE funding, it was not an opportunistic move and he first learnt his industry from the inside out. He firmly believes that nothing in life comes easily, and that learning to roll up your sleeves and get dirty is vital for the development of individuals and the nation as a whole.

“Affirmative action means that young black graduates are snapped up by large corporates at big salaries as they leave university. They start their working life already successful, without really walking the path to success. It’s creating a generation of South Africans who don’t have to work for their dreams, which I find worrying. I want to leave a legacy that shows what you can achieve if you want something badly enough, and you are willing to work for it, without a hand-up from the system. That will be Nestlife’s legacy,” says Sithole.

Having painstakingly built his company from the ground up, he knows what he’s talking about. Nestlife began as Life and Pension Insurance Corporation (LPC), an insolvent insurance company about to be liquidated. Not even its holding company wanted to take the risk of keeping it open.

But achieving dreams comes at a price, and for Sithole, that was giving up his cushy executive’s salary, with the second home, boat and overseas holidays just over the horizon, to build his vision.

Today he sits at his executive boardroom table, immaculate in a pressed suit, the head of a company that underwrites R150 million in premium incomes. It’s a long way off from a decade ago, when he filled the role of admin staff, salesman and GM all in one.

He had to, he had a staff of one: himself. “My journey to this point has been a rollercoaster of highs and lows. I have never been afraid to take a step backwards in the present if it meant future growth, but that has also meant sacrifices, for myself and my family.” It’s this commitment to a long-term goal that has really paid off.

Looking back to where Nestlife started takes us to 1996. Sithole had just used everything he owned as collateral to buy LPC, which was based in Mafikeng. His wife had already supported him through numerous changes in his life, and now he was asking her to support his decision to spend each week, Monday to Friday, in Mafikeng, away from his home in Johannesburg and his family. He didn’t give her all the details, particularly the fact that the house had been used as surety to buy the business, because he didn’t want her to shoulder the stress of the risk he was taking; and, he quips, he wanted to stay married.

Not only would her husband be away each week, but she had to accept that he’d given up his safe executive position, comfortable salary and future promotions to do so. His ultimate goal was to bring the business to Johannesburg, but he had no idea how long that would take. LPC was an insurance underwriting business with a limited licence to operate in the North West province. Before he could begin operating in Joburg he needed to raise R10 million to buy a national licence from the Financial Services Board (FSB). He had no idea how long that would take.

Why did he do all this you ask? Because he had a gut feeling that a business that no one wanted and was about to be liquidated was his ticket to achieving his ultimate dream of owning his own insurance business and building a legacy.

It takes a lot of faith in yourself to make that kind of commitment, but Sithole has self-belief in spades, and by 1996 he had also worked his way slowly and consistently through every position in the insurance industry, knowing that he would need to know the sector inside out before he launched his own company. He knew his market and he was determined to follow his instincts.

“I’ll take it”

Sithole’s introduction to LPC was almost accidental. By 1996 he had been in the insurance industry for over fifteen years. He had worked his way up the corporate ladder and he was the chairman of a subsidiary of Hollard. Life was good. And then he was approached by Capital Alliance, a local company that had its eye on him.

“It was the mid-1990s and Capital Alliance was rebuilding its reputation. Its short-term insurance business had suffered setbacks and although its life insurance side was still strong it was focusing on damage control. That meant restructuring and getting rid of dead weight, particularly subsidiaries that were not performing, or were not in line with the group’s new strategy.” LPC was both. While wooing Sithole, the group’s CEO, Ben Geldenhuis, invited him to visit the floundering subsidiary in Mafikeng. The group wanted to liquidate the company and if Sithole joined them it would be one of his first tasks.

“When we arrived in Mafikeng it took less than ten minutes to assess the company, including its five employees. There wasn’t much to see.” Which Geldenhuis of course knew. 1994 had seen a major change in South Africa’s political structure. The homeland governments were disbanded, replaced by new provincial governments. LPC had been formed to cater for the Bophuthatswana government’s insurance and pension policies. With the dismantling of that government, LPC lost the bulk of its client list. By 1996 it was underwriting an annual premium income of R5 million.

From this revenue, claims and other business expenses had to be paid, and in terms of the Insurance Act, insurance companies had to maintain a stipulated capital adequacy requirement, or they would be declared insolvent. LPC was dangerously close to this mark and the FSB wanted to revoke its limited licence, which meant it wouldn’t be able to trade at all, and Capital Alliance had no real interest in trying to secure new clients in the struggling North West province, which had taken the place of Bophuthatswana. Liquidating the company was a no-brainer.

But not for Sithole. “I can’t explain what happened. Here was this struggling company and instead of agreeing with Ben, I suddenly had this irrational but burning fire in me that this was it. Here was an opportunity for me to get into the industry on my own. I had been prepared to start a business from scratch — I was planning for it even — but this was a way in now, and I was ready.

I literally walked in and thought ‘I’ll take it’. Ben couldn’t believe it. In fact, he put a lot of effort into trying to convince me not to do it. He told me I was crazy, highlighting that I’d need to raise R10 million before I could move the business to Joburg, and Mafikeng did not offer that many potential clients. Maybe I was crazy.

I certainly didn’t know where I would get the money to buy the company, let alone how I would make the R10 million to buy a national licence, but I wanted to buy it anyway. One of the things that I believe is that at the core of all successful entrepreneurs is the ability to see the moment of truth when you are facing it. I knew what I was capable of, and I needed to trust in myself that I could get it done.”

Despite all the hurdles Sithole faced, he and Geldenhuis agreed on the terms of sale. Sithole raised just under the required money by putting his house and everything he owned up as collateral, for which he would own 74% of LPC. Capital Alliance would retain 26%. “I remember the day we signed the papers. Ben turned to me and said, Vusi, now you own an insurance company. Don’t f*** it up.”

Building foundations

Leaving his position as chairman of an insurance company to go it alone was not the first time Sithole had started from scratch. His entire career is marked by decisions to take the difficult road, rather than be satisfied with his current situation.

“I was a black varsity student at Fore Hare during the early 80s, when activism was rife in South Africa, and that influenced me. I wasn’t going to accept a life of mediocrity because of South Africa’s political system. I had big dreams for myself, and the will to achieve them.”

That activism got Sithole kicked out of Fort Hare early, and he arrived back in Johannesburg without a degree or a job. “It was the early 80s and work was not easy to find. Black people were carrying pass books, which the government used to keep track of employment status and work permits.

After months of looking for work, my father managed to get his boss at Anglo American Shipping to organise me a clerk’s position. My first day arrived, and as a young, idealistic young man, I looked at the office job I now had and rebelled against it. I arrived late, I took an extra long lunch hour and I left early.

I didn’t like the office space or the work. I didn’t appreciate the necessity of a job. The next day I was fired and while I wasn’t really sad to see the job go, I didn’t realise the problems the ‘unemployed’ stamp one day after the ‘employed’ stamp in my pass book would have on future job prospects. I was unemployed for months after that. Finally, I was put in contact through a family member with Sam Moseu, who sold insurance policies to the working class in Joburg. He needed someone to do admin for him, and so I was introduced to the insurance industry.”

It was the mid-80s and Sithole was back in an office, doing clerical work, which was exactly what he didn’t want to do, but months of looking for work had taught him the value of a job, any job. That didn’t mean he was giving up on his ambitions though. “I had my eye on hitting the streets with Sam. It took some convincing, but within a few months he let me join him in selling policies. Sam ended up being the man who taught me my first lessons in sales, and the ins and outs of the insurance industry.”

Once there, Sithole soon proved his flair for selling policies. Under Moseu’s guidance he gained enough of an understanding of the insurance industry to become a partner in the business, an arrangement that would last for almost five years. By the late 1980s, the business was doing well, but Sithole knew it would never reach the heights he was ultimately aiming for. And then an opportunity presented itself: local insurance company African Life opened a ‘black’ branch to target the burgeoning working class in the city of Johannesburg. “African Life needed black consultants to sell the policies, and I was approached to join them.”

It was an interesting choice for Sithole. He had now been running his own business with Moseu for almost five years. African Life was not offering him a managerial role. He would be a sales consultant earning commission only and working with Khehla Mthembu.

Many people would have seen this as a step backwards. Not Sithole. “I saw an opportunity to increase my skills base and learn from the best. I would be working in a large corporate firm, and if I worked hard I would move up through the ranks.

“I started at the bottom. I thought I understood my industry, but it didn’t take long to realise how little I knew. I hadn’t been formally trained as a salesman either, so I needed massive growth in that area as well. But I also knew why I had made the move. The whole point was to learn where my shortfalls were and to fix them.”

It wasn’t an easy process. “I was on commission only. I had just gotten married and I actually took a pay cheque home one month worth zero Rands. Policies had lapsed or been cancelled and the returned
commission meant I earned nothing that month. It was an important lesson: don’t sell something to someone who doesn’t want it, or can’t afford it. Their cancelled policies meant I took no money home that month.”

Sithole’s perseverance paid off though. Over the course of nine years he worked his way up the ranks, learning from each position. “I was a consultant, field manager, branch manager and finally area manager for Johannesburg before the BEE insurer Afgen approached me to join them.

It seemed like a good next move.” After a few years at Afgen the opportunity to join Hollard through a subsidiary presented itself. It was the early 90s and Sithole was a hot commodity. He was an experienced black man in the insurance industry at a time when political change was paramount. His future in the industry seemed assured. But still the dream of owning his own company persisted. He was simply biding his time, waiting for the right moment to present itself.

One of Sithole’s strengths is the discipline and patience to lay excellent foundations. By the early 1990s he had come a long way from the youth who was fired on his first day for being a lazy employee. He is a firm believer that the best things in life are earned, and his business success is a prime example of this philosophy.

“By the time I bought LPC I knew my industry inside out, mainly because I had held virtually every position the industry offers. I knew what it took to sell insurance policies, and conversely the administration behind receiving and honouring policies. I knew where things went wrong, and how successful underwriters operated. I had learnt the business from the ground up, and I didn’t make my move until I knew I was ready.”

Creating NestLife

After so many years of preparation, one would think that finally owning his own company would be the end of Sithole’s journey. In fact it was only the beginning. The decision to buy LPC once again took Sithole backwards before he went forwards.

The first challenge was buying the company.  Once he managed to pull the money together though, he still needed to take the company from insolvency to making enough money so that he could raise R10 million in cash to buy the national licence. “I planned to take the company from Mafikeng to Johannesburg from the beginning. I knew there were no real growth possibilities in Mafikeng. As a life insurance underwriter my clients would be big companies, and those were all in Johannesburg. But, unlike Capital Alliance, I didn’t need huge clients in the North West to make LPC viable.”

In order to make LPC a sustainable company, Sithole needed to secure new clients and grow his existing client base. He also needed to run a tight ship, because although he would save money from his own salary, he needed to make the business profitable. “At that stage LPC was a tiny underwriter.

We couldn’t compete with large players in the industry on price, so we needed to differentiate ourselves in another way.” That way was superior service. Sithole shared his vision of growth with his employees and how they were going to get there.

Everyone was invested in his vision. He trained them in the art of customer service, and together they started growing the business, pulling it out of insolvency step by painful step. It took Sithole four long years to secure the national licence, which he achieved through the business’s profits, and by raising capital on the back of his own assets.

Four years of driving from Joburg to Mafikeng each week. Four years of wondering not only if and when he would reach his goal, but whether there would even be enough money to pay the company’s bills at the beginning of each month.

Sithole’s determination, intimate understanding of the insurance industry and support of his staff won out though. The company became ready to secure a national licence, which did not mean Sithole could rest on the success of achieving his goal; more work was ahead.

“When I bought the national licence from the FSB in 2000, I bought out Capital Alliance, changed the company’s name to Nestlife and moved the main office to Johannesburg, but I kept the office in Mafikeng. That was where our clients were, and we needed that business. But moving to Joburg presented its own challenges. After working as hard as I did for four years to achieve my first goal, I was now quite literally a one-man band again. I was making contact with the people I knew in the industry to pitch my business to them. I don’t think I slept for months.”

And then the tipping point came. Sithole had risked everything on being able to secure big clients if he managed to get a national licence, allowing him to sell insurance policies to companies across the country, and not just in the North West province.

His faith in himself and his reputation in the insurance industry were well founded. “I carried the differentiator we had used in Mafikeng through to Johannesburg with me. Even today, as a R150 million company, our differentiator remains service. Never underestimate the power of looking after your clients.”

His strategy was simple. He would use his reputation to secure a meeting, investigate what areas his potential clients were dissatisfied with in terms of their current providers, and find a solution for them. Success lay in following through on any promises he made to deliver those solutions. While doors opened slowly, they did open, and Sithole used every inch to gain a mile. “I approached insurance companies that I knew held big accounts, like Eskom, and I pitched our business as their underwriter.

I didn’t try to get everything at once. Instead, I convinced them to give me a small percentage of their business so that I could prove myself. Here my reputation in the industry definitely played a role. They knew me, and they were willing to give me a chance.

I wasn’t an unknown.” 5% of a company’s business soon grew into 10%, then 20%, until in many cases Nestlife now holds 100% of its clients’ business, all through an unwavering focus on service.

In 2006, Nestlife closed the year with R30 million in premium income, and has experienced exponential growth ever since. In March 2011 the company closed on R150 million, and Sithole aims to grow the business to R1 billion by 2015.

“One of the most interesting things I have learnt on this journey is that you never stop learning. Running a R30 million company is different from running a R10 million company, or a R150 million company. Each time the business has grown, I have had to grow with it, and expand my own horizons.”

Sithole recently completed an MBA degree, which took him four years to achieve on a part-time basis. “If I don’t keep my eye on the ball at all times, I won’t achieve my 2015 vision, or the goals I have set after that. I need to stay on top of everything happening in my company and the insurance industry.”

The human factor

Sithole does not attribute Nestlife’s growth to himself alone. “One of the biggest mistakes I have made is letting excellent employees leave the business without fighting for them. Without skilled staff there is no business, and if there is one piece of advice I can offer other business owners, it’s hold on to the people who make your business great.”

Nestlife employs 100 people across its four offices in Johannesburg, Bloemfontein, Durban and the Eastern Cape. The Mafikeng office was closed in 2006 and its employees relocated. 2011 will see further expansion with offices opening in Cape Town, Nelspruit and Limpopo province.

“Excellent service starts in-house. If employees understand and buy into a company’s vision, they can support that vision and the business’s overall values. We call it our 2015 vision, and it’s something that everyone, from the cleaning staff to our top brokers, lives and breathes from the moment they walk through the doors each morning.” Interestingly, this is one area that any business can achieve at no cost. Clients appreciate good service and follow-up support. Every business owner can foster this attitude in their staff.

Sithole has worked hard to earn the respect and dedication of his employees. He is particularly focused on helping each individual under the Nestlife banner grow. “We have data capturers and clerks that started as cleaning or gardening staff. If we recognise potential we will open every door we can for that individual to achieve what they are capable of.”

This isn’t ‘bleeding heart’ altruism on Sithole’s part. Netslife’s growth is testament to what employees can achieve if they believe in where a company is headed. “People are not productivity tools. They have personal and career aspirations. As a business owner I have worked hard to never stifle those aspirations, but encourage them instead.”

Future vision

The discipline needed to take an insolvent company and turn it into a major player in an historically competitive industry cannot be downplayed. Sithole lives his life according to three strict pillars: physical, mental and spiritual. He is a firm believer that both the mind and body need to be maintained and worked out for overall health and success, and that spiritual awareness completes a healthy balance.

His passion gave him the drive to not only create a dream, but doggedly pursue it, even when he thought he couldn’t go any further. His discipline has allowed him to realise his vision.

“I want to create a legacy for myself, my family and even South Africa. I’m proud to say that Nestlife isn’t the product of a BEE deal, and I think it’s important for South Africa that companies like mine exist. I want to show our youth that if you put your mind to it, you can achieve anything.”

Growing businesses

One of Nestlife’s goals is supporting people, particularly the historically disadvantaged. Sithole has watched people start their companies from scratch, and if he has believed in them, he has used Nestlife as a tool to give them business and support them, through mentoring and resources. One such story is a man who started a small local insurance broking firm. Nestlife supported him, and his insurance company has grown from strength to strength.

Four years since Sithole started supporting him, he has grown to the point of being able to place R11 million worth of business with Nestlife. “At our broker awards earlier this year, he came up to me and said, ‘Mr Sithole, I owe my company’s growth to you. A quarter of that R1 billion company that you are planning for 2015 will come from my business.’ That’s the commitment and the passion we share with the people we have walked our journey with,” says Sithole.

Naming Nestlife

When Vusi Sithole bought a national licence in 2000, he had the perfect opportunity to rebrand the company. The name Life and Pensions Insurance Corporation (LPC) did not actually reflect what the underwriting firm did, as the company no longer sold pension policies. “I got the whole company involved. We had a staff competition to see who could come up with the most appropriate name.”

As it turned out, Sithole himself came up with Nestlife. “I was in the bush watching birds build nests. They were building their homes so patiently and deliberately, piece by piece. I started musing about what we did, helping people build their futures and support their families. The symmetry was perfect. Nests for eggs and protecting baby birds, Nestlife for security for people.”

Nadine Todd is the Managing Editor of Entrepreneur Magazine, the How-To guide for growing businesses. Find her on Google+.

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Entrepreneur Profiles

Jason English On Growing Prommac’s Turnover Tenfold And Being Mindful Of The ‘Oros Effect’

Rapid growth and expansion can lead to a dilution of the foundational principles that defined your company in its early days. Jason English of Prommac discusses how you can retain your company’s culture and vision while growing quickly.

GG van Rooyen

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Vital stats

  • Player: Jason English
  • Position: CEO
  • Company: Prommac
  • Associations: Young President’s Organisation (YPO)
  • Turnover: R300 million (R1 billion as a group)
  • Visit: prommac.com
  • About: Prommac is a construction services business specialising in commissioning, plant maintenance, plant shutdowns and capital projects. Jason English purchased the majority of the company late in 2012, and currently acts as its CEO. Under his leadership, the company has grown from a small business to an international operation.

Since Jason English purchased Prommac in 2012, the company has experienced phenomenal growth. At the time he took over as owner and CEO, it was a small operation that boasted a turnover below R50 million.

Today, Prommac is part of a diversified group of companies under the CG Holdings umbrella and alone has grown it’s turnover nearly ten fold since Jason English took over. As a group, CG Holdings, of which Jason is a founder, is generating in excess of R1 billion. How has Prommac managed such phenomenal growth? According to Jason, it’s all about company culture… and about protecting your glass of Oros.

Jason English

Related: 5 Top Lessons From LAWTrust To Prepare For Super-Charged Growth

“As your business grows, it suffers from something that I call the Oros Effect. Think of your small start-up as an undiluted glass of Oros. When you’re leading a small company, it really is a product of you. You know everything about the business and you make every decision. The systems, the processes, the culture — these are all a product of your actions and beliefs. As you grow, though, things start to change. With every new person added to the mix, you dilute that glass of Oros.

“That’s not to say that your employees are doing anything wrong, or that they are actively trying to damage the business, but the culture — which was once so clear — becomes hazy. The company loses that singular vision. As the owner, you’re forced to share ‘your Oros’ with an increasing number of people, and by pouring more and more of it into other glasses, it loses the distinctive flavour it once had. By the time you’re at the head of a large international company, you can easily be left with a glass that contains more water than Oros.

“Protecting and nurturing a company’s culture isn’t easy, but it’s worth the effort. Prommac has enjoyed excellent growth, and I ascribe a lot of that success to our company culture. Whenever we’ve spent real time and money on replenishing the Oros, we’ve seen the benefits of it directly afterwards.

“There have been times when we have made the tough decision to slow growth and focus on getting the culture right. Growth is great, of course, but it’s hard to get the culture right when new people are joining the company all the time and you’re scaling aggressively. So, we’ve slowed down at times, but we’ve almost always seen immediate benefits in terms of growth afterwards. We focus heavily on training that deals with things like the systems, processes and culture of the company. We’ve also created a culture and environment that you won’t necessarily associate with engineering and heavy industries. In fact, it has more in common with a Silicon Valley company like Google than your traditional engineering firm.

“Acquisitions can be particularly tricky when it comes to culture and vision. As mentioned, CG Holdings has acquired several companies over the last few years, and when it comes to acquisition, managing the culture is far trickier than it is with normal hiring. When you hire a new employee, you can educate them in the ways and culture of the business. When you acquire an entire company, you import not only a large number of new people, but also an existing organisation with its own culture and vision. Because of this, we’ve created a centralised hub that manages all training and other company activities pertaining to culture. We don’t allow the various companies to do their own thing. That helps to manage the culture as the company grows and expands, since it ensures that everyone’s on the same page.

“Systems and processes need to make sense. One of the key reasons that drove us to create a central platform for training is the belief that systems and processes need to make sense to employees. Everyone should understand the benefits of using a system. If they don’t understand a system or process, they will revert to what they did in the past, especially when you’re talking about an acquired company. You should expect employees to make use of the proper systems and processes, but they need to be properly trained in them first. A lot of companies have great systems, but they aren’t very good at actually implementing them, and the primary reason for this is a lack of training.

“Operations — getting the work done — is seen as the priority, and training is only done if and when a bit of extra time is available. We fell into that trap a year ago. We had enjoyed a lot of growth and momentum, so we didn’t slow down. Eventually, we could see that this huge push, and the consequent lack of focus on the core values of the business, were affecting operations. So, we had to put the hammer down and refocus on systems, processes and culture. Today Prommac is back at the top of it’s game having been awarded the prestigious Service Provider of the year for 2017 by Sasol for both their Secunda and Sasolburg chemical complexes.

Related: Establishing The Wheels Of Change In Business

“If you want to know about the state of your company’s culture, go outside the business. We realised that we needed to ‘pour more Oros into the company’ by asking clients. We use customer surveys to track our own performance and to make sure that the company is in a healthy state. It’s a great way to monitor your organisation, and there are trigger questions that can be asked, which will give you immediate insight into the state of the culture.

prommac

“It’s important, of course, to ask your employees about the state of the business and its culture as well, but you should also ask your customers. Your clients will quickly pick up if something is wrong. The fact of the matter is, internal things like culture can have a dramatic effect on the level of service offered to customers. That’s why it’s so important to spend time on these internal things — they have a direct impact on every aspect of the business.

“Remember that clients understand the value of training. There is always a tension between training and operational requirements, but don’t assume that your clients will automatically be annoyed because you’re sending employees on training. Be open and honest, explain to a client that an employee who regularly services the company will be going on training. Ultimately, the client benefits if you spend time and money on an employee that they regularly deal with.

“For the most part, they will understand and respect your decision. At times, there will be push back, both from clients and from your own managers, but you need to be firm. In the long term, training is win-win for everyone involved. Also, you don’t want a client to become overly dependent on a single employee from your company. What if that employee quits? Training offers a good opportunity to swop out employees, and to ensure that you have a group of individuals who can be assigned to a specific client. We rotate our people to make sure that no single person becomes a knowledge expert on a client’s facility, so when we need to pull someone out of the system for training, it’s not the end of the world.

“Managers will often be your biggest challenge when it comes to training. Early on, we hired a lot of young people we could train from scratch. As we grew and needed more expertise, we started hiring senior employees with experience. When it came to things like systems, processes and culture, we actually had far more issues with some of the senior people.

“Someone with significant experience approaches things with preconceived notions and beliefs, so it can be more difficult to get buy-in from them. Don’t assume that training is only for entry-level employees. You need to focus on your senior people and make sure that they see the value of what you are doing. It doesn’t matter how much Oros you add to the mix if managers keep diluting it.”

Exponential growth

When Jason English purchased Prommac late in 2012, the company had a turnover of less than R50 million. This has grown nearly ten fold in just under five years. How? By focusing on people, culture and training.

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Who’s Leading Your Business Billy Selekane Asks – You Or The Monkey On Your Back?

You’re either a change-maker, or someone who is influenced by the shifting conditions around you. The truly successful know how to determine their own destinies. Here’s how they do it.

Nadine Todd

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  • Player: Billy Selekane
  • Company: Billy Selekane and Associates
  • About: Billy Selekane is an author, internationally acclaimed inspirational keynote speaker, and a personal, team and organisational effectiveness specialist.
  • Visit: billyselekanespeaks.com

We live in a world of disruption. We live in a world where Airbnb’s valuation is $31 billion, but the Hilton’s market cap is $30 billion. Airbnb doesn’t own one square kilometre, and yet they’re worth more than the world’s biggest hotel chains with enormous assets. We live in a world where things have been turned upside down.

In this brave new world, you can either thrive, or fight to survive. As a leader in your organisation, the choices you make, the mental mind-space you occupy and how you engage with those around you, will determine your personal success, as well as that of your entire organisation.

“The business of business is people. You can’t just pay lip service to the idea that they are your most important asset. You need to live it. Leaders must be intelligent and honest. You can’t just push people to meet the numbers,” says Billy Selekane, personal and business mastery expert and international speaker.

The problem is that great leaders need to first find balance within, before they can successfully lead their organisations.

“Things can no longer be done the same way,” says Billy. “Success today is defined by people who are driven, are inspired by their own lives and goals, and have the power and capability to inspire others.” But before you can achieve any of this, you need to rid yourself of the monkey on your back.

Related: Billy Selekane

The monkey on your back

“If I continue doing what I’m doing, and thinking what I’m thinking, I’ll continue to have what I have,” says Billy. “That’s the definition of insanity. Are you doing things by default or design?”

Billy’s analogy is a simple one. It’s something we can all relate to, and it’s the single biggest thing stopping us from clearing our minds, focusing on the positive and achieving success. He calls it the monkey on our backs.

“Every one of us is born with an invisible monkey on their shoulder,” says Billy. “Your monkey is always with you. Sometimes they’re the one speaking, and you need to be careful of that.” What you need to be even more aware of than your own monkey though, is everyone else’s monkeys.

“Every interaction we have is an opportunity for what I call a monkey download. You have an argument with your spouse before work, and you end up getting into your car with not only your monkey, but theirs as well. Your irritation level has doubled thanks to the extra monkey. Now you get irritated with a pointsman, another driver or a taxi on your way to work. You’ve just added three monkeys.

“By the time you walk into the office, you’re bringing an entire village of monkeys with you. They’re clamouring, clattering, arguing with each other, and the noise is deafening. Not only does everyone get out of your way, but you can’t hear yourself think. And the more your mood drops, the more monkeys you download from the people around you. This is not the path to focus, achieving your goals or being happy. It’s certainly not the path to great leadership.

“Great leaders know how to keep all those monkeys out. They know how to control their moods, and regulate their own positivity. They understand that they are the architects of their own success.”

Getting out of the monkey business

To be a great leader — and personally successful and happy — you need to start by getting out of your own way, and as Billy calls it, ‘getting out of the monkey business.’ You need to not only shake your own monkey, but everyone else’s as well.

According to Billy, there are four simple areas you can begin focusing on today that will help you become the person (and leader) you want to be.

First, honesty is the foundation of everything else you should be doing. “Be clear and straight. Speak to people simply and honestly, but with respect. Connect with them, not through the head, but with the heart. Don’t play tricks.”

Related: 5 Top Lessons From LAWTrust To Prepare For Super-Charged Growth

Next, be authentic. All great leaders are authentic, and recognised as such. Aligned with this is integrity. “This is sadly out of stock, not only in South Africa, but the world,” says Billy.

“There is nothing as disturbing as a leader without integrity, and on a personal level, you won’t achieve emotional stability if you aren’t a person of integrity.”

Finally, you need to embrace love. “Wish your employees well. Wish your family, friends and connections well. When we are given love, and trusted to perform, we take that and pay it forward. In the case of business, this means your employees are giving the same love to customers, but if everyone showed a little more love, the world would be a better place. When people feel cared for, they show up with their hearts and wallets, and they pay it forward.

“Great leaders understand this. They don’t only focus on making themselves better, but adding to everyone around them. Remember this: In every business, there are no bad employees, just bad leaders. Employees are a reflection of that.”

If you want to build a better future, business or life, you need to start with yourself.


Do this

Stop letting negative thoughts and minor irritations derail you. You are the master of your moods and thoughts, so take personal responsibility for them.

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Entrepreneur Profiles

Shark Tank Funded Start-up Native Decor’s Founder on Investment, Mentorship And Dreaming Big

Vusani Ravele secured offers from every single Shark in the first episode of Shark Tank South Africa, eventually settling on an offer from Gil Oved from The Creative Counsel. Entrepreneur asked to him how this investment has changed his business.

GG van Rooyen

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Vital stats

  • Player: Vusani Ravele
  • Company: Native Decor
  • Established: February 2016
  • Visit: nativedecor.co.za
  • About: Native Decor creates visually pleasing products from sustainable timber. The company’s designs are innovative and functional, with its creations mostly inspired by South African cultures, landscapes and wildlife.

It all started with a cordless drill. In February 2015, Vusani Ravele received a drill from his girlfriend as a Valentine’s Day gift. He immediately became obsessed.

“I couldn’t stop drilling holes in things,” Vusani laughs. “I just loved working with my hands.”

Unlike most people, who lose interest in a Valentine’s Day gift by the first day of March, Vusani’s passion for his cordless drill didn’t dissipate. Instead, it had reignited a spark. Thanks to that cordless drill, he rediscovered a love for design he’d first felt in high school. And one year later, he had started a company called Native Decor.

Related: 6 Great Tips For A Successful Shark Tank Pitch

As a start-up he then made the bold move to enter the inaugural season of Shark Tank South Africa. He was funded by Gil Oved on the very first episode. It was a life-changing experience, but Vusani is keeping a level head. The money helps, but he’s trying not to let it change his approach too much.

I’m doing my best not to think of Native Decor as a funded start-up. The money has allowed me to do certain things, like buy a new CNC machine, but I still try to think like a founder without money. Once you have a bit of money in the bank, the temptation exists to throw it at every problem, but that’s not how you create a successful business.

You need to bootstrap and pretend that you don’t have a cent in the bank. With a bit of lateral thinking, you can often come up with a solution that doesn’t require money. It might require more effort, sure, but I believe it creates a stronger foundation for your business. If a business can carry itself from early on, its odds for long-term success are much higher. You also need to fight the urge to spend money on things like fancy premises or extra staff. The longer you can keep things lean, the more runway you create for yourself.

Vusani Ravele of Native Decor

I didn’t enter Shark Tank just for the money. The money was important, of course, but there was more to it than that. Looking purely at money versus equity, Gil Oved’s offer wasn’t the best, but I knew that I wanted to work with Gil. Stepping into the room, my primary aim was to attract him to the business.

He wanted 50% equity for R400 000 of investment. I wanted to give away 25% for the same amount. We settled on 40% for R400 000 with an additional R3 million line of credit. It was more of the company than I initially wanted to give away, but I was okay with it, since I saw it as the cost of Gil’s involvement, which I knew would add bigger value to the business than just the cash injection.

Related: Shark Tank’s Dawn Nathan-Jones: How Leaders Who Focus On Growth Will Build Successful Companies

Investment comes in many forms. I wanted Gil to invest in the business because I realised that investment isn’t purely about money. I didn’t just want him to invest his cash in Native Decor, I also wanted him to invest his time and energy. You can get money in different places. You can create a business that funds its own growth, for example, or you can get a loan from a bank.

What an investor like Gil offers, however, is knowledge and access to a network. Money can help a lot with the growth of a business, but a great partner can help even more. By giving Gil 40% of the business, I’ve ensured that he has skin in game. He has a vested interest in seeing Native Decor succeed, and that’s worth more than any monetary investment.

True mentorship can be a game-changer if you’re running a young start-up. A great advantage that often comes with investment is mentorship from someone who knows the pitfalls of the entrepreneurial game. With a new business, it’s easy to be sidetracked or to chase an opportunity down a dead end.

Gil is visionary, and he has helped me focus on the long-term goals I have for Native Decor. He has also helped me to think big. As young entrepreneurs, I believe we often think too small. We don’t chase those audacious goals. Someone like Gil, who has seen huge success, can help you push things further and to dream bigger.

You need to dream big, but act small. It’s important to have big dreams for your business, but you should also chase those easy opportunities that can help you build traction. When I started, I wanted to try and get my products into large retail stores, but the fact of the matter was, as a start-up, I didn’t have a strong negotiating position.

There was a lot of bureaucracy to deal with. Gil advised me to focus on the ‘low-hanging fruit’ — those small gift stores that would be keen to carry my products. By doing this, I’m gaining traction and building a track record for the business. Also, I realised the importance of aligning myself with the right kind of stores. Perhaps being in a large retailer isn’t a good idea, since this is where you typically get cheap items produced overseas. Unless you’re purely competing on price, that’s probably not where you want to be.

Related: Shark Tank’s Romeo Kumalo Weighs In On High-Impact Entrepreneurial Businesses


Take note

Funding is great but it’s not all about the money. If that’s what you’re chasing you’re doing your start-up an injustice.

Watch the Shark Tank investment episode here:

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