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10 Inspirational African Entrepreneurs

The spirit of entrepreneurship burns bright in Africa, despite the socio-economic challenges faced by a number of self-starters. These ten entrepreneurs are leading the charge when it comes to accelerating Africa’s seeding as a destination for investment.

Nicole Crampton

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Patrick-Ngowi

Cephas Nshimyumuremyi says to be successful is to do what you know

Cephas-Nshimyumuremyi

Image credit: CNN

“Don’t think that you need a lot of capital. Start with a little, but use the knowledge and the environment that you already have.”

Vital Stats:

  • Entrepreneur: Cephas Nshimyumuremyi
  • Business: Uburanga
  • Website: uburanga.com
  • Start-up story: Cephas Nshimyumuremyi used his salary from teaching to fund his venture.
  • Growth: In seven months his business was worth R280 000 the equivalent of Rwf14 million.

Cephas Nshimyumuremyi always wanted to be an entrepreneur but he knew his teaching salary wasn’t going to be enough to fulfil his dreams.

He saw a business opportunity when he became aware that the Rwandan people were attempting to use local plants for skin infections and to improve skin quality.

Nshimyumuremyi decided to use his science background and his knowledge of Rwanda’s local plants to create his company, Uburanga Products to create herbal smearing jellies and soaps out of local medicinal plants. He started his production line in his garage.

His products filled a need in the market because Rwandans were already using these plants in its raw form. As a result, Nshimyumuremyi created a more versatile and user-friendly product that he could distribute around the country. He wanted the benefits from the properties of these medicinal plants to reach a larger audience.

Today the venture is worth R432 000 and he employs 12 workers. In the next three years Nshimyumuremyi plans to release a further eight products. This will give him a total of 12 products and make him a profit of R834 000, this may not seem a lot in rand but in Rwandan Francs it’s roughly Rwf45 million.

Christine Buchanan and Louiza Rademan let their passion make them a success

Oh-Lief

Image credit: ohlief.co.uk

“We have a big vision for our brand – we would like to be the number one organic household brand in South Africa.”

Vital Stats:

  • Entrepreneurs: Christine Buchanan and Louiza Rademan
  • Business: Oh-Lief
  • Website: www.ohlief.com
  • Start-up story: Christine Buchanan and Louiza Rademan founded their business in 2010.
  • Growth: They sell internationally, while 25 leading Woolworth’s stores carry their products locally.

When Christine Buchanan had her first child, a son, he suffered from intolerable nappy rash and she couldn’t find a natural product to help soothe him. Christine’s sister Louiza Rademan concocted a nappy rash balm for him and it worked wonders. Buchanan then began selling the balm to other mom’s in her maternity classes and they swarmed to the product.

Buchanan and Rademan, then realising they had stumbled upon a business opportunity, decided to take their enjoyment for making lotions and balms to the next level. They quit their senior positions in the property sector to follow their passion for creating products using only natural ingredients.

Their first attempt at selling their product happened at a three-day trade show. They sold out 100 tubs of the nappy rash balm on the first day; they went home, made 100 more and sold all of those on day two. They worked through the night to make 100 more for the third day where they sold out again.

Buchanan and Rademan’s products are now sold internationally and are carried by leading retailers including Woolworths. These sisters are so successful because they control all aspects of their business. They realised that taking on the world with a niche product requires ingenuity and innovative marketing.

Related: Meet The 40 Richest Self-Made Entrepreneurs On Earth

Abasiama Idaresit manages being ahead of the curve

Abasiama-Idaresit

Abasiama Idaresit

“We must inspire our kinsmen to look beyond the now and to see the big picture. If we don’t roll up our sleeves and get dirty, no one else will.”

Vital Stats:

  • Entrepreneur: Abasiama Idaresit
  • Business: Wild Fusions
  • Website: wildfusions.com
  • Start-up story: Abasiama Idaresit started his company in 2010 with as little as USD250.
  • Growth: Six years later his company, Wild Fusion is worth USD6 million.

Abasiama Idaresit didn’t make any money for the first eight months. He was chased out of a potential client’s office for his outrageous concept. Digital marketing was almost unheard of in Nigeria at the time.

Idaresit approached Baby M, a small business that catered to the needs of new mothers and their babies. Baby M had a network of sales agents who searched for customers on a daily basis to make ends meet. Idaresit finally managed to convince Baby M, his first customer, to give him a chance by offering a money back guarantee if he didn’t give the company a return on investment.

Baby M gave him N40 000(roughly USD250) as payment in advance so that Idaresit could work his magic. In three months Baby M’s revenue grew from USD1000 a month to USD100 000 a month through digital marketing. The business was immediately overwhelmed with orders.

Now Wild Fusion spans three countries and boasts clients like Unilever (Nigeria and Ghana), Vodacom, Diamond Bank, Planned Parenthood and many more African and international clients.

Divine Ndhlukula shows us how to keep hustling until you make it

Divine-Ndhlukula

Divine Ndhlukula

“My quest to start and run my own company never dissipated and therefore, even as I was back at work, I started investigating the various opportunities that I could see and think of.”

Vital Stats:

  • Entrepreneur: Divine Ndhlukula
  • Business: SECURICO
  • Website: www.securico.co.zw
  • Start-up story: Ndhlukula founded SECURICO in her cottage with four employees.
  • Growth: The organisation has won over 20 major national and regional awards and Divine Ndhlukula becoming a living African business legend after she won African Woman of the Year 2013.

Divine Ndhlukula always had an entrepreneurial passion; she would sell clothing to her colleagues and rent out trucks to construction companies to make a little extra money. She was always on the lookout for her next entrepreneurial opportunity.

But, her entrepreneurial momentum was side tracked. Her brother fell on hard times and she had to sell all her budding enterprises to save him from bankruptcy. She had to go work with her brother on his farm to keep it afloat and almost lost her house while trying to keep the farm afloat.

Once she returned to work she became aware of an entrepreneurial opportunity to branch into the security services sector. She decided to enter into this sector because of how she, as a customer, experienced the sector. Ndhlukula found that the security sector lacked the professionalism, quality and services that a number of businesses required.

Although she didn’t have a passion for security, she had a passion for business. So with almost no capital and no knowledge of security she started her business with a determination to succeed.

SECURICO is now one of Zimbabwe’s largest security groups and has partnerships in South Africa, China and India. Ndhlukula’s business has developed into a world-class security service organisation.

Related: 10 Successful SA Women Entrepreneurs’ Top Advice On Balancing Work And Family

Chris Kirubi shares his secrets to success; hard work and out of the box thinking

Chris-Kirubi

Chris Kirubi

“Business is always a struggle. There are always obstacles and competitors. There is never an open road, except the wide road that leads to failure. Every great success is always achieved with fight. Every winner has scars.”

Vital Stats:

  • Entrepreneur: Chris Kirubi
  • Business: Director at Centum Investment Company Limited
  • Website: centum.co.ke
  • Start-up story: Chris Kirubi started out by buying and flipping houses.
  • Growth: The Kenyan entrepreneur has built an empire spanning real estate, manufacturing and investments, which has made him one of the wealthiest people in Africa.

Chris Kirubi decided to make extra money by purchasing and selling houses. He used the money he made from flipping houses to invest in some of the city’s finest up-and-coming business and residential organisations. He started out with a clever profit making scheme and investment strategy, but now he is an icon of the Kenyan property industry

Today, Kirubi owns more than 40 commercial and residential properties in Kenya’s capital, Nairobi. These properties have a total value of USD200 million and Kirubi owns assets worth USD100 million.

“I rise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world,” admits Kirubi. “This makes it hard to plan the day. But because I want to achieve my purpose and make a difference in society, I will stop focusing on the frightful things I see when I take my eyes off my goals and instead fix them there.”

Jacky Goliath and Elton Jefthas grew their business by exploiting a gap in the market

Jacky-Goliath

Jacky Goliath

“None of us came from rich families so we had to grow it out of our own pocket and I also had to wait for the business to be big enough to actually pay my salary.”

Vital Stats:

  • Entrepreneurs: Jacky Goliath and Elton Jefthas
  • Business: De Fynne nursery
  • Website: www.defynne.co.za
  • Start-up story: Started as a part-time activity with 1 000 plants.
  • Growth: Today it is a 22 hectare farm and the business is still growing.

Jacky Goliath and Elton Jefthas’ story begins when they spotted a business opportunity in selling fynbos. Their part-time business of selling and growing fynbos and indigenous plants was run out of Jefthas’ backyard, but it couldn’t keep up with the market demand. Once their side job paid more than their actually jobs they decided to create De Fynne nursery.

Goliath and Jefthas eventually moved their nursery from the backyard to a 0.5 hectare piece of land in 2005. Three years later they needed additional space to keep up with growing demand and to host 600 000 plants, so they moved once more to a 1.5 hectare property.

Today, they employ 22 permanent workers and produce indigenous potted plants, fruit trees and other ornamentals for the local horticultural and agricultural industry. To keep up with the constantly growing demand they had to move to a commercial-grade 22-hectare site.

De Fynne nursery now supplies plants to retailers such as Woolworths, Massmart and Spar, as well as landscapers, commercial farmers and wine estates

Related: Reel Gardening Warns That Innovation Is Never Easy

Christine Mbabazi show us how to profit off your own talent

Christine-Mbabazi

Christine Mbabazi

“My friends saw me and saw I was uniquely dressed at parties, weddings and even at work. So the word spread and the demand grew.”

Vital Stats:

  • Entrepreneur: Christine Mbabazi
  • Start-up story: Christine Mbabazi started her fashion journey making clothing for herself.
  • Growth: Her clothes were featured during the Rwanda Cultural Fashion Show.

Christine Mbabazi’s journey began when she decided to make her own clothes so she could look unique and interesting. Her friends saw her designs and convinced her to start selling them. Soon clients would come knocking on her door, asking for her creations.

Eventually Mbabazi had to expand into a store to keep up with the orders. She is still in the early stages of her world domination, but that is exactly what she plans to do. She is strategising to become a household name in Rwanda, and sell her clothing all over the world.

“The brand is promoting African fabric and African designs, with my creativity, and developing it for the rest of the world,” says Mbabazi.

Patrick Ngowi believes; if opportunity knocks, answer

Patrick Ngowi

Patrick Ngowi

“It was a business on the side, nothing serious, but I loved the fact that I was making money and I was becoming a bit independent. The very foundation of the little success I’ve achieved was formed during those years. I learned about profit and loss, about margins, about marketing and hiring the right people– I learned so many things at that stage.”

Vital Stats:

  • Entrepreneur: Patrick Ngowi
  • Business: Helvetic Solar Contractors
  • Website: www.helvetic-group.com
  • Start-up story: Started as an entrepreneur at the age of 15, earning money on the side during high school.
  • Growth: Ngowi is now Chairman of the United Nations Global Compact in Tanzania.

During his gap year, Patrick Ngowi discovered that cell phones in Asia were cheaper to buy than in Tanzania. Ngowi bought cell phones from low-cost manufacturers and sold them to the Tanzania’s gadget enthusiasts for a profit. At the tender age of 18, Ngowi’s first start-up made USD150 000.

At the time, Tanzania’s national power grid met about 10% of the population’s electricity needs. This meant that most companies, government agencies and wealthy families depended on electrical generators. While Ngowi was selling low cost cell phones and traveling back and forth from Hong Kong and China he learnt about solar panels and renewable energy.

He realised another business opportunity had presented itself and Ngowi wasn’t going to let this one pass either. He founded Helvetic Solar Contractors, to help Tanzania manage its energy crisis. Ngowi’s little start-up went on to become the Helvetic Group. This company would go on to install 6000 rooftop solar systems and branch out into Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi.

Helvetic Group partnered with The Climate Reality Project and Ngowi spoke alongside Al Gore at the first ever Climate Reality Leadership Corps in Africa.

Related: Fake It ‘Til You Make It: How These 10 Entrepreneurs Did Just That

Zainab Ashadu reveals how profitability can come from your roots

Zainab-Ashadu

Zainab Ashadu

“The biggest lesson I’ve learned is to dream big, but start small.”

Vital Stats:

  • Entrepreneur: Zainab Ashadu
  • Business: Zashadu
  • Website: zashadu.com
  • Start-up story: Zainab Ashadu started her business in 2011 out of a tiny workshop
  • Growth: Her company now sells her handbags locally and internationally.

Zainab Ashadu started a sustainable luxury handbag company, which specialises in handcrafted leather pieces. Ashadu uses locally sourced materials including leather, exotic skins and rough cut semi-precious stones.

Ashadu produces her luxury handbags out of a workshop where her team is able to benefit from traditional techniques passed down through generations, by a community of local artisans.

She sells her handbags via her company’s website and supplies products to a selected number of boutiques. Ashadu’s brand has spread internationally to London, Paris and the USA, elevating awareness of Nigeria’s beautiful craftsmanship.

Alex Fourie reveals how to turn skills into profitability

Alex-Fourie

Alex Fourie

“Initially, it was when I was solving my own problem. Then it was when I posted my first CapeAds ad and my phone rang 15 times on the first day. I thought that there might be a business here.”

Vital Stats:

  • Entrepreneur: Alex Fourie
  • Business: weFix
  • Website: ifix.co.za
  • Start-up story: Alex Fourie started his entrepreneurial journey with no capital.
  • Growth: Now the company has 11 stores across South Africa.

Fourie’s entrepreneurial journey started when he wanted to fix his iPod. Eventually, his friends started coming to him for help with the same problems he’d experienced and soon he was repairing devices out of his dorm room in Stellenbosch.

Today, his weFix national chain of stores repair on average 10 000 Apple and Samsung products a month. As a result of the high influx of tech related customers, the weFix stores now host in-house product lines. These stylish wooden device casings and accessories are branded Houdt. The weFix stores also host mobile charging stations called RiCharge. Fourie exports both product lines into 12 African countries.

He also offers iSureFix, an affordable protection plan for Apple products and uFix, a DIY Apple repair kit. Fourie believes: “Excellence isn’t a result of one or two good decisions. “It’s a result of thousands of small, good decisions. A bunch of above-average decisions will culminate over time. Everything you do, do it well and the rest will sort itself out.”

 Read more on Alex Fourie Here.

Nicole Crampton is an online writer for Entrepreneur Magazine. She has studied a BA Journalism at Monash South Africa. Nicole has also completed several courses in writing and online marketing.

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Lessons Learnt

10 Gary Vaynerchuk-Approved Success Strategies

The VaynerMedia founder gets real about drive and ambition.

Nina Zipkin

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Gary Vaynerchuk

Perhaps the best way to describe Gary Vaynerchuk is “nonstop.” The founder of VaynerMedia, VaynerSports and Vayner/RSE is also an author, host and vlogger who records just about everything he does.

He is known for being relentless in his pursuit of the hustle and has a loyal audience of millions (2.4 million on Instagram, 1.58 million on Twitter and 2.3 million on Facebook) who take his advice to heart.

We took a deep dive into his blog archive to find some of his best tips and advice for making it as an entrepreneur.

1. On why failure shouldn’t scare you

“It’s the lack of fear of failing that has allowed me to make decisions so quick. People don’t make decisions because they are scared to lose. I make decisions because I want to know what’s going to happen, and then I use that information to help advise what I do next,” Vaynerchuk writes.

“The one thing I know for sure, is the outcome of what happens if you don’t decide. If you never make a decision, or deliberate for too long, all the upside or potential opportunity could be lost.”

Related: 5 Vital Keys To Success From The Likes Of Tony Robbins And Gary Vaynerchuk

2. On the value of patience

“The game is LONG. There’s so much opportunity. Optimism is the secret to capitalizing on this opportunity and that’s where you need to live. You need to figure out how good it really is and how much opportunity you have,” Vaynerchuk writes.

“Patience is practical. I push patience because I know life is long. Everybody around here is running around like it’s not. 24 year-olds running around like it ends tomorrow. Like they need it now. What’s wrong with being 26 or 41 or 73?”

3. On why age has nothing to do with ability

gary-vaynerchuk-entrepreneur

“The youth are the future of everything. They are the future of business, of society, of law and of government. We better pay attention, and empower them to be the best that they can be,” Vaynerchuk writes.

“My hope is that we lose the sentiment of age makes a difference in skill. There are plenty of 22 and 24 and 26 year olds in my office right now that work harder and smarter than some of the 50 year olds I know. It’s just the truth and we are going to continue to see this trend adopted in the marketplace. You can’t deny results.”

4. On how to build a lasting legacy

“I think my actions map to my ambitions. Because my ambition is to have legacy. I treat it that way. I treat everybody I interact with, with kindness and respect. These days, as my notoriety has grown, I still treat people just the same. I look them dead in the face and I’m just in it with them for that one minute or two or three or 10, and really care about they have to say! Because I am very appreciative and humbled for their attention. I will never get over it. I will never get over the fact that people actually care.”

Related: 8 Pieces Of Sage Advice From Ernest Corbett of Tintswalo Safari Lodges

5. On the importance of an open door policy

“I don’t think one can win in business without having the proper teammates and empowering them to play their role. Ideas can come from anywhere but the fact of the matter is you need an offensive line, you need a receiver, you need a quarterback, you need them all and I think any leader that doesn’t recognise that will ultimately not succeed in the long term. Obviously you can have a company that runs for six months and you sell it but over a 10, 20, 40 year period, there is no other strategy that will actually work.”

6. On why you need to prioritise your own happiness

“To truly be selfless, you have to give without expectation. It’s the mindset of giving with expectation, which kills everything. It just doesn’t work at all. Being selfish is the gateway to selflessness, because you learn to take care of your own personal needs first in order to use that as collateral later so that you can really, truly help.”

7. On why you shouldn’t think about how things “should be”

gary-vaynerchuk-entrepreneur-quote

“Navigating our society and our lives with the hope of how it ‘should be’ versus the way it actually is, is the quickest and least practical way to create success. This is something I say to myself every single day,” Vaynerchuk writes.

“I am in control of my destiny. Nobody else. I get to decide how I react and how I respond, and the greatest motivator to inspire perspective is the simple statement ‘What’s the alternative?’”

8. On why you must value the perspective you bring to the table

“Why are you taking somebody else’s opinion about yourself greater than your opinion about yourself? It’s the single greatest mistake that will keep you from finding happiness and confidence in who you are,” Vaynerchuk writes.

“And it’s not that their opinions don’t matter. You have to have an equal amount of respect for yourself as for others. It’s a democratic society and everyone gets a vote. So beyond the thought leaders, and politicians and school systems you have to have respect for yourself. You need to put yourself on your own pedestal and then start weighing the opinions of others proportionately to how you actually feel about yourself.”

9. On why the competition doesn’t matter

“I am and always have been consumer focused. The reason I don’t pay attention to my ‘competition’ is not because I’m brash or cool. It’s because it doesn’t matter when you’re obsessed with the end consumer,” Vaynerchuk writes.

“Because it starts and it ends with the end consumer and where the attention actually is. I will always do actions that bring you the most value because then I get value in return.”

10. On why your goal should be to keep working

“I didn’t need to get mine at 25. Heck, I don’t even need to ‘get mine’ at 41. This is the long, long game. I’m driven by the climb. It could be because I’m an immigrant and I just have this chip on my shoulder. Or maybe it’s in my DNA. I don’t like winning. I like losing. I like the struggle. I like people telling me that I can’t,” Vaynerchuk writes. “I don’t give a shit if my payday comes tomorrow. I want the game. The game is my life. There will never be a moment to quit. There’s no dollar amount. Nothing you can do to make me stop.”

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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7 Motivational Habits That Drive Millionaires

Habits seem to rule us. They can hold you back, or you can adapt the right habits and prosper.

John Rampton

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wealthy-people

Have you ever been awed by the motivation of a successful entrepreneur, leader or athlete? I have. It’s not jealousy, either. Far from it. It’s respect for how motivated they are. Even though I consider myself fairly motivated, their examples encourage me to become even more focused and driven.

The good news is that by adopting the following seven habits, anyone can become more motivated:

1. Find your why

“Highly motivated people start with their WHY. WHY do you do what you do?” asks J.D. Meier in an article for Time.

“If you climb a mountain simply because it’s there, that’s probably not enough to keep you going when the going gets tough. If you know WHY you do what you do, and it matters deeply to you, then you will find your strength in any situation,” adds Meier.

Why do you want to start a workout regiment? Because it was suggested by your doctor? Did your spouse mutter a comment? Are you tired of feeling lethargic? Once you find your why, you can use that to motivate you to follow through with exercising.

2. Get your morning started on the right foot

sleeping-habits

One of the easiest and most powerful habits that drive motivation is kicking off your day correctly by having a morning routine. Think about it. Getting your day started on the right foot makes it a lot easier to stay motivated throughout the entire day.

To ensure that you wake up on the right side of the bed, try these tips:

  • Have a reason to get out of bed. It could be anything from walking your dog, making sure your kids are off to school, or squeezing in a workout before work.
  • Stretch and breathe deep. This gets the blood and oxygen flowing to your brain, and helps you get up.
  • Do something simple to start the day. I make my bed immediately once I’m up. It’s not because I want the bedroom to look presentable. It’s because it’s an easy task that makes me feel like I’ve already accomplished something — even though I’ve only been awake for a couple of minutes!
  • Create rote tasks. As explained by Due’s Miranda Marquit, “Look for ways you can make mornings easier by creating rote tasks that are easy to accomplish. We don’t like to face a day that starts hard. Do what you can to make it easier. Once you’re up and moving, you’ll feel better and eventually be awake enough to tackle the
    hard stuff.”
  • Set goals for the day. This doesn’t have to be lengthy. Just list your top priorities for the day.

Related: 20 Things Millionaires Aren’t Sharing With You

3. Change it up

There’s an old saying: Variety is the spice of life. Variety keeps you motivated to meet goals when you haven’t yet made much progress and risk falling into a rut.

Changing things up is like your workout routine. You can’t just work on your legs. Other parts of your body need some loving too. Keep doing the same exercises and you’ll soon plateau.

The same is true for any aspect of your life. Changing things up gives you a chance to break up the monotony, try out new skills, and have new experiences that can lead to new ideas or develop a new passion.

4. Chart your progress

This is a simple way for you to see how far you’ve come along. Sounds simple, but think about when you set a reading goal. Maybe you want to read more books. Your initial goal is to read for just five minutes a day, but once you start you’re reading for ten minutes and then 30 minutes and soon you’re flying through books.

If you can do 30 minutes, then why not bump up to 40? Just imagine all the books you’ll be able to read. Mark this on your calendar each and every day.

5. Create environmental anchors

working-environment

This is simply writing your goals or inspiring quotes on a Post-it or 3×5 card and placing it on the wall of your office, the inside of your car, bathroom mirror or calendar. A daily reminder of your goal will push you to accomplish it.

6. Develop gratitude

Just by identifying the one thing every day that you’re grateful for is powerful enough in helping you achieve both mini-goals and your big goals, since it develops the ability to look for a daily opportunity that you can grow from.

For example, if you’re grateful that you just landed a new client today, use that feeling and experience to secure two new clients tomorrow.

Related: The One Habit of Self-Made Millionaires

7. Discover your passion

Obsession can be an extremely powerful motivator since it creates its own motivational might. In fact, the most successful individuals are those who chased their passion and are doing what they love to do.

When you become passionate, whether it’s at work, exercising, or volunteering, it no longer becomes laborious. It becomes something that you enjoy, look forward to, and want to get better at.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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From Local To Global: Bruce Mackenzie CA(SA) Shares Top Tips On Being A Successful Entrepreneur

Managing Director of W.Consulting, Bruce Mackenzie CA(SA), has done exactly that and shares his top tips.

SAICA

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bruce-mackenzie

How do you grow your own SME into a global consultancy? Managing Director of W.Consulting, Bruce Mackenzie CA(SA), has done exactly that and shares his top tips.

“I started W.Consulting with the aim of providing an independent, high-quality alternative for corporates and audit firms looking for advice on International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). The business has grown substantially to more than 40 people working globally, providing advisory services on IFRS, audit risk and corporate finance, training and IT product development.” These are Bruce’s five top tips for achieving growth.

1. Take the risk as soon as possible

It was a nerve-wracking decision to go on my own, as CAs(SA) are taught to be risk-averse. It’s very tough to throw away a CV, but rather than spend a life regretting not taking a chance, if you have thoughts of running your own business, do so sooner rather than later, as the decision only gets tougher with each passing year.

Related: Better Thinking For A Better World

flights-to-london-long-day2. Work hard and persevere

One point seldom emphasised enough when talking of entrepreneurs is that it is very hard work and requires a great deal of energy and perseverance. I attribute my success in large measure to high energy levels. You need that.

It’s exhausting — long days, early flights to London to deliver training, and sometimes back again the same day. So, yes, you need a surplus of energy.

3. Know how to sell yourself and your business

You also need a predisposition towards selling, as any business requires sales in order to expand. Selling is something that’s in my DNA.

Especially when selling advice, it requires persistence because I know that a potential client will at some point need services like ours, so I make sure W.Consulting is top of mind when that day comes. I achieve this by keeping up the relationship, sending new ideas with no sales angle connected, mailing interesting books, and checking on how things are with the client. It’s a matter of having genuine interest. 

4. Hire trustworthy people who share your passion

There are many risks in establishing your own business and one of the first challenges stems from the need to expand beyond a one-man operation. There’s a certain comfort in doing all the work and seeing all the cash in the business as yours, but it puts a fairly low ceiling on the business’s prospects and potential income.

The decision to expand and hire your first employee is both a big decision in itself and important as to the individual you select. It’s the biggest single decision most entrepreneurs have to make — and one that most don’t make early enough. You need to scale up a business to release resources at the top. That process never really ends — whatever you’re currently doing, you have to continually ask yourself: “Could this be done down the line?”

In an SME, each hire, but especially your first, has to be somebody you can trust, someone with the same objectives as you. Instead of having 9 to 5 people, rather employ someone who will do whatever is necessary, regardless of what time of day it is.

My philosophy is to hire people with passion and who preferably know what they’re doing, and then pay well to get them.

Related: 10 Things Successful People Tell Themselves Every Day

5. Continue to innovate

Most businesses fail not for want of an entrepreneurial idea, but because of management and accounting basics like cash flow. CAs(SA) already understand these basics and so arguably can concentrate on the actual operations of the business. However, because CAs(SA) can earn good money in the corporate world, most opt for the easy route in the corporate environment.

The future and success of any business is to keep on doing what it’s doing well. Bruce attributes the success of the business to its culture of continuous innovation: “It’s easier to sell something new,”  he concludes.

Visit www.saica.co.za

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