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5 Key Areas Pratley Are Using For Current And Future Growth

The aim of most family-run businesses is to stand the test of time, a goal that influences strategy and tends to take the long-term view over short-term gains. Entrepreneur spoke to Kim Pratley and his sons, Andrew and Charles, about growing a business without compromising on quality or price.

Nadine Todd

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Vital Stats

  • Players: Andrew Pratley, Kim Pratley, Charles Pratley
  • Company: Pratley
  • Founder: George ‘Monty’ Pratley
  • Est: 1948
  • Divisions: Electrical division, adhesives division, mining and minerals division; Select Hairdressing Supplies
  • Visit: www.pratley.co.za 

In both B2B and B2C circles, Pratley is a household name. Pratley Putty and Pratley Steel can be found in most home workshops and garages, while cable junction boxes tend to be called ‘Pratley Boxes’ in the electrical world — even if they aren’t Pratley-made.

Building a brand that has cornered the market in many respects is a good foundation for future success, but it does not guarantee it. Sustainable growth takes an ingrained value system that the entire organisation believes and follows, strong cash flow, continuous innovation, an unwavering focus on quality and sacrificing short-term gains for long-term aims.

Pratley has been on a steady growth trajectory over the past 70 years. Many companies reach maturity and stagnate. Pratley has done the opposite. All growth periods are followed by consolidation, but despite numerous challenges and tough market conditions, the line continues to move up.

Here are five key areas that Kim, Andrew and Charles are focusing on to maintain that growth, now and for the future.

1. R&D: As the core – not a small side division

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“Research and development has always been our core, and as a result of that, diversification,” explains Kim Pratley, CEO of the business. “We launched with our electrical division in 1948, followed by the adhesives division.” Before their first product of that division, Pratley Putty, was used by NASA on the moon, it was originally developed to stick electrical terminals into an electrical junction box and insulate them.

“Once it was developed though, we realised that we could productise it outside the electrical sector for the consumer market, and our adhesives division was born.”

Developing new products is in Pratley’s DNA. The company aims to release at least three or four new products into the market each year and is continually looking for new and better ways to do things. “We have to grow somewhere,” says Andrew Pratley, Pratley Group IT Manager and General Manager of Select Hairdressing Supplies. “We need to be simultaneously growing our markets and our product ranges, and that means we need to find better and more cost-effective ways of doing things.”

There is a school of thought that says a smaller, tighter product range keeps costs down and the business focused. In many ways Pratley has done the opposite, with its electrical division offering more than 3 000 products, many of which are patented and based on proprietary technology.

“Like most things in business, our product range follows the 80/20 principle,” agrees Kim. “20% of our product range is responsible for 80% of our revenue. Logic would say why have the rest then? Unfortunately, because of the way the market operates, customers expect us to also provide the niche products that don’t sell well but are occasionally needed. If we chopped off the 80%, we would lose a lot of the customers who make up the 20%, but are responsible for 80% of our revenue.

“It’s a perception — a customer who buys all their products from Pratley expects to be able to get everything from us. If they need to go to a competitor to get a special fitting, they might move all their business.”

That said, there are cost and complexity implications when carrying such a large product range, which means the management team needs to be hyper-focused on the details. “We’re currently looking at rationalising our product range. Products become obsolete and if you’re too focused on new products without paying attention to the entire range you can end up carrying old stock or manufacturing unnecessary items,” says Charles, Engineering Manager: Group Technical Services.

“Our customer base appreciates that we’ve become a problem solver in the market — they come to us with a need, for example, a stainless-steel cable gland for the food industry, and we will design and manufacture it. It must be viable for us as well, but on the whole, because we do everything in-house, we can add value as real problem solvers and as a one-stop shop,” adds Andrew.

Customers want quality, their lives simplified, and good service — exactly what Pratley aims to offer.

R&D’s role in creating diversification for the business has also mitigated Pratley’s risks. “Rubber brushes inside a flame-proof cable gland is what keeps people alive — if they fail, people die. If there’s an explosion inside the apparatus and it gets out and ignites the atmosphere, people die. The technology that goes behind that rubber is polymer technology; adhesives are also based on polymer science. We can bring the same expertise from the one side of our business into the others,” explains Kim.

Related: Kid Entrepreneurs Who Have Already Built Successful Businesses (And How You Can Too)

A sister company of Pratley, Select Hairdressing Supplies, was first bought from Kim’s father-in-law when he retired, but the business has since been expanded to bring manufacturing in-house and to develop proprietary products. “We asked our R&D team what they knew about hair products,” says Kim. “They went away, did some research and came back and said we could definitely do this. We also import some products. It’s a profitable business in its own right that diversifies our risk.”

“It’s a high-end product,” adds Andrew. “Our market is professional hairdressing salons, and they cater to clients who demand quality, high-end hair products. We don’t compete with cheap imports at the lower end of the market. The focus is on quality at a reasonable price.”

On the whole, Pratley’s R&D follows a two-pronged approach. Charles, Andrew and Kim all love R&D. If they find something cool, they want to mess with it until they find a real-life application for it.

A strong R&D mindset means the team is always open to finding solutions to problems.

Pratliperl, a lightweight, thermally insulating cement aggregate that was originally developed for low-cost housing, is now used as a fire-proof plaster that doubles the thermal insulation of a building. It’s very lightweight and is ideal as a screed where additional floors to buildings are required. Pratliperl has been used at Loftus Versfeld Stadium and the Sandton City parking lot.

2. Finding market fit

pratley-south-africa

A strong R&D component works hand in hand with the ability to shelve products that aren’t working in the market, and Pratley has had a few of those. Sometimes even the best products don’t find product-market fit — in one memorable case it was because the product worked too well.

“We launched a product called Wham a few years ago because customers kept requesting an ultra-quick super-glue,” says Andrew. “We wanted to design the fastest adhesive in the world — and we did — but it ended up being practically unusable. It was just too quick for the end user.”

It was an interesting lesson for the team on giving customers what they need, and not necessarily what they ask for.

“We also brought out a palm cleaner that I love, but which the market hated,” says Kim. “We wanted a solution for dirty palms after you’ve changed a tyre, for example. Palm Cleaner was essentially a glue that stuck to the dirt and then rolled off the hands in little balls. It was extremely effective.”

Consumers didn’t read the instructions and thought it was a hand cleaner. The result was Palm Cleaner getting stuck in the hairs on the back of people’s hands.

Related: 30 Top Influential SA Business Leaders

“We try to stay away from ‘me too’ type products. We look for problems that haven’t been solved or where we can do it better. That involves a lot of trial and error, and we won’t always get it right,” says Charles. “That’s the cost of R&D. You can’t let your ego or personal feelings get in the way of what your market research is telling you.

“We have a department that tests everything in every way the market could use it. Interestingly, we often find that we test a product for one thing, and end up finding a whole host of other applications for it. Sometimes the larger market is the one we didn’t originally develop the product for.”

It’s an interesting process. You can’t make assumptions about any market, even one you know well, and if you aren’t looking at solutions from every angle, you could miss a huge opportunity. This thinking has become ingrained at Pratley.

3. Quality first

successful-south-african-companies

In a world where one industry after the next is becoming commoditised and businesses are competing on price (particularly against low-cost imports), Pratley’s strategy has remained the same, with a strong focus on quality, in-house manufacturing and R&D.

How do they maintain this from a cost perspective, particularly when so many companies are turning to outsourcing to keep costs as low as possible?

“We have two main drivers,” says Kim. “Every pack of Pratley carries a statement signed by me that our products must outperform any other on the world market. It’s a big statement, and we mean it. It’s so big that we’ve found in some cases people actually don’t take it seriously because of its magnitude.”

Over the years Kim has performed a number of stunts proving his confidence in Pratley’s products, including filming a TV commercial standing below a 13 tonne bulldozer suspended by a joint bonded together with Pratley Wondafix.

“We don’t believe the statement itself necessarily leads to sales, but it does have a big impact internally,” he says. “Inherent in our core values is the ideal that we need to be producing the best — it’s expected from every person in the organisation, at all times.

“From an external customer point of view, the fact that the product works is important. How we ensure that quality is a result of what we do internally.” A product that consistently works fosters trust and brand loyalty, which results in repeat customers.

Because the company’s focus is on quality, this is a non-negotiable, but there is a cost to quality as well. From a sales perspective, this means Pratley’s sales force needs to concentrate on educating the market about purchasing a slightly higher priced product for the long-term gains that are achieved from peace of mind and the risk mitigation of operating in a safer environment.

“We manufacture cable junction boxes, cable glands and the rubber shrouds that protect those glands for hazardous locations. If something goes wrong and there’s a fire or an explosion because a cheap inferior product was chosen and used, people can lose their lives,” says Charles.

“In some cases, it’s relatively easy to convince the customer as they have either had a  costly experience with a cheaper product or have seen UV-damaged rubber shrouds from a cheaper brand. It’s up to our team to educate our customers. There is also always a segment of the market that will buy cheap, no matter what, and we accept that and don’t waste resources trying to convert them. There is also a segment that recognises and always chooses quality, and that’s our ideal market.”

To mitigate higher costs associated with quality, R&D and local manufacturing, Kim and his directors work tirelessly to control costs. Every line item is scrutinised, but never at the expense of quality.

“Our sales arm plays a key role in the business for this reason and we emphasise training to ensure the team is equipped to engage with customers and understand their needs and the risks they face, balancing those risks with the costs of investing in quality.”

In line with a strong quality proposition are high exstore service levels that ensure Pratley can offer high-quality customer service. “We measure this according to the value that comes in versus the value executed. If 100 orders come in, we must execute 99% of them exstore immediately,” says Kim.

“This requires a large amount of inventory on hand, so we need to pay attention to which stock moves and how quickly, but ultimately we understand the frustrations and costs of downtime, and we aim to minimise both for our customers.”

From a cost perspective, the father and sons team understand that they need to be aware of the market and competition in order for their manufacturing methods and pricing to be internationally competitive, and the way to achieve that is through the right machinery, controls and management.

“We have a very flat management structure,” says Kim. “We aren’t top heavy. We have directors who are in charge of specific departments, middle managers and foremen. Each department is run as clean and lean as possible. The numbers are monitored by each foreman and reviewed at board level. Nothing slips through the cracks, and each number is scrutinised.”

4. The power of (the right) people

pratley-logo

One of the biggest hinderances to growth that Pratley has faced is human resource issues. Based on the West Rand of Johannesburg, the business doesn’t have access to as large a labour pool as it would if it was based on the East Rand or closer to the city centre.

That said, Kim, Andrew and Charles love the lifestyle on the West Rand, and they operate from a large property developed specifically for their needs. 185 employees work from that site, with satellite offices in Durban, Port Elizabeth, Cape Town and Bloemfontein.

“We employ multi-disciplined people who have skills in their primary activities, but who can also play a secondary role,” says Andrew.

“If you employ a person for their underlying work ethic, willingness and general attributes, you’ll employ a good person who can do anything,” agrees Kim. “Attitude and a willingness to learn means you can upskill someone and they will be eager to take on more responsibility and perform their defined roles. This is true across the organisation and not just in middle management positions.”

Related: Inspiring Entrepreneur Siyanda Dlamini Believes You Need To Back Yourself To Build Your Dreams

As a result of this people-focused strategy, Kim, Andrew and Charles remain involved in the business’s hiring process.  “It’s not something you can delegate,” says Kim.

5. Cash is king

pratley-company-founder

Pratley is in the enviable position of never having financed the business. As a result, the company has grown more slowly than it could have, with each new acquisition or investment into machinery or R&D funded internally through cash flow, but it has never had to service debt.

“We’ve been comfortable delaying growth, where necessary, to be able to make investments from our own cash reserves,” says Kim.

“We have very strict but fair payment policies in place. Credit control is a non-negotiable. Our rules are set in stone and there’s never an exception; it doesn’t matter who the client is.”

The terms are straightforward: Payment is in the month after the date of invoice. If you place your order on the first of the month (and it’s dispatched immediately, thanks to the company’s 99% exstore service levels), you can essentially have 60 days to pay, as the payment is only due at the end of the following month. Pratley also offers good settlement discounts.

But there are never, ever any exceptions to the rules. When their biggest adhesives client took a R2 000 settlement discount that they weren’t entitled to, supply was immediately stopped.

“The Adhesives sales manager resigned over that decision,” says Kim. “He handed over his letter of resignation and said we were mad. It was a small amount and they were a big customer, but I knew that we’re not in business despite that decision; we’re in business because of that decision.

“If we had buckled, it would have set a precedent. Instead, I called them up and said, ‘You know the rules, I know the rules, I know what you’re doing, you know what I’m doing, let’s carry on.’ They’re still a very good customer today — but it was important to stick to our guns. It’s important to have people in the business who understand this, which is why I accepted that sales manager’s resignation. More companies flounder on the rocks of cash flow than anything else.

“Our growth strategy has been to build up cash reserves. That takes rules that you stick to above all else. One of my favourite business mantras is that profit is the very small difference between two very large numbers. All you need is one small percentage change on one of those numbers and your profit disappears. If you’re not taking risk with one of those numbers, well, I see that as security and survival.

“That doesn’t mean we don’t spend money — we’ve just invested in some very expensive machinery that will increase our output, productivity and efficiency down the line. It’s a large upfront expense for future growth and sustainability. But it’s a mitigated risk because we’ve built up the reserves to take that next step.”


KEY INSIGHTS

Cash is King               

Profit is the very small difference between two very large numbers. One small percentage change on one of those numbers and your profit disappears. How are you mitigating that risk?

Skills differentiate                 

In a competitive business landscape where skills are in high demand, employing multi-disciplined people who have skills in their primary activities but can play strong secondary roles is crucial.

The cost of quality                 

When you’re competing against commoditised products that differentiate in price, it’s not enough to know you offer quality. You have to prove the value of that quality by educating your market.

Read next: This Is What Bevan Ducasse Did When He Realised wiGroup’s Revenue Model Wasn’t Working

Nadine Todd is the Managing Editor of Entrepreneur Magazine, the How-To guide for growing businesses. Find her on Google+.

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Blood, Sweat And Tears – The Journey To Becoming Emerging Entrepreneur Of The Year®

You see the awards, the magazine features and the highlight posts on social media. But building a successful business from the ground up is a really tough journey behind the scenes. Outsourced CFO co-founder Louw Barnardt opens up to Entrepreneur Magazine about what it actually takes.

Louw Barnardt

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I can tell you about all the exciting successes. I can mention things like two to twenty-six professional staff in under five years, more than R500 million in growth funds raised for SMEs, some notable awards and many other things that make the headlines. This is a part of the story and we do try to stop and celebrate the successes as we go…

What I would rather share with you are the trials and tribulations, the challenges and heartaches of the process of building a company. It is in this trail by fire that one learns the most about being a good entrepreneur. The most challenging of times often determine your path and hold the best lessons.

Blood

For me, blood represents the big losses. Bleeding financially is definitely a part of the journey. Very few companies have started up without some months or years of bootstrapping, of keeping it lean. For us, that meant continuing on articles salaries for more than a year after we had qualified. It took years to get to and exceed market salaries. This has been a painful sacrifice, but one that all founders need to make in order to get out of the rat race. Live a few years like no-one would so that you can live the rest of your life like no-one else can.

Relationships are also often counted among the losses. Many a time we have invested a lot into a staff member only to see them jump for a better deal. Many times people close to you try to steal ideas or copy direction. It hurts, but it has definitely been a reality.

Sweat

Sweat represents hard work. Outsourced CFO was built on many long hours of hard, focused work. We’ve made this fun by working from coffee shops on weekends or from the beach for a day. But hard work has definitely been a part of getting things to where they are today. Nothing worth building is easy. Don’t start a business if you want to work less!

Sweat also means stretching. Coming from a finance background, there are dozens of core skills that you need to teach yourself in order to be successful at business. Sales, marketing, public speaking, networking, people management, technology. It is a process of continuously stretching your mind and your abilities. Treat learning like a superpower!

Related: Seven SA Star Entrepreneurs Recognised At Premier Competition

Tears

Tears just refer to literal tears. I have yet to meet an established founder who has never come home after a ridiculously tough day to a good cry in the dark. The journey has massive emotional asks. Disappointment, rejection, temporary defeat (which feels like failure in the moment) and other experiences are a part of the game. You have to learn how to dust yourself off, refocus and keep moving forward. But sometimes it’s okay to just shed that tear. Heaven knows I have.

Fate has a cruel sense of humour

entrepreneur-of-the-year

The funny thing is that our biggest successes have very often been followed in quick succession with our biggest disappointments. The week we received the Premier’s award as one of the top two Emerging Companies in the province is the same week we had to postpone paying our own salaries. The month I came back from honeymoon early in our second year of business is the same quiet April that we had to seriously consider if we should continue with business. The list goes on! Business teaches you in a very real way to hold both the extremely high and extremely low moments at the same time.

Pivotal moments and the grind

In every young company’s story there are pivotal moments. Things that happen that change the game. I’ll share two of ours with you. At the end of the very April month mentioned above, we won the contract to become the national financial service providers to Microsoft’s BizSparks Program, allowing us to work with the top 10% of a pool of one thousand tech start-ups being incubated by Microsoft. This set us on a coarse to become the leading authority in the country on finance for tech start-ups.

Another such moment was the Fundraising Readiness Program that we ran with Investec, where we helped over a dozen private companies prepare for and pitch for growth capital. The brand association and fundraising processes that came from this also changed our trajectory. These pivotal moments change your game – but don’t take anything away from the weeks and months of hard grind in between them.

Entrepreneurship is a team sport

No great company has ever been built by one person. It takes a village to build a business. I have been blessed with two co-founders that I have been friends with for over a decade. Their work and support as well as that of our team (which include my sister Dore too) has been the secret sauce to our success. Don’t try to go it alone. Surround yourself with likeminded people who share in and contribute to your vision.

In summary

The road to building a successful company is a steep and rocky one. It is scattered with high mountains as deep valleys. You will need patience, dedication, willingness to sacrifice and a sincerely, fierce belief in your vision for the road. But if your why is big enough, you can get up every morning and make that dream a reality!

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SA Entrepreneur Takes First-Of-Its Kind Business To An International Level

Jo Farah shares some insights on his entrepreneurial journey as Global Entrepreneurship Week (GEW) gets underway.

Entrepreneur

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South African-born entrepreneur and creator of the world’s first environmentally friendly sneaker care product – Jo Farah says entrepreneurship has always been part of his DNA, and making a valuable contribution to society his ultimate goal.

The founder of Sneaker LAB – an innovative business that’s managed to create a first-of-its-kind, biodegradable sneaker care product, delivered his sentiments on entrepreneurship and his entrepreneurial journey as Global Entrepreneurship Week (GEW) kicked-off in 170 countries around the world this week.

Farah, who’s been mentored and groomed by his entrepreneur father, says developing a successful business has always been part of his life’s plan. And while he managed to establish a few start-ups during his entrepreneurial journey, which includes founding a guerrilla marketing agency in South Africa, and producing ads for the likes of Adidas, New Balance and Puma it still wasn’t enough.

After returning from the United States in 2008 with just one thing on his mind – to help cure South Africa’s conundrum by creating jobs for the unemployed, and in-turn fostering economic growth, Jo invented a one-of-a-kind sneaker care product, and put shoulder to the wheel to establish his business in 2013.

Related: How Lorenzo Escobal Bootstrapped His Way To Competing With Titans And Attracting Top-Tier Clients

sneaker-lab-founder-jo-farahStarting a sneaker care product range was a natural choice, especially considering Jo’s passion for sneakers, street wear and urban culture. He also wanted to create a complimentary product to accompany the list of sneaker brands that has inspired him over time. Jo’s work behind the scenes commenced in earnest and in no time he conducted enough research to support his theory – there was a gap in the market for branded sneaker care products. He knew that he was on a good wicket.

“There already was a range of non-branded products on the market, but my research revealed there was a healthy appetite for branded, environmentally friendly sneaker care products. That spoke directly to my business model,” he says.

Today, Sneaker LAB has placed Cape Town on the map with its premium global status – it’s the only sneaker care product range in the world to be Green TAG certified, environmentally friendly and biotech driven. Its products are water-based, readily biodegradable, and the packaging is suitable for recycling. The business also operates internationally, in 50 countries across Africa, with an experiential brand store in Braamfontein Johannesburg; as well as downtown Los Angeles in the USA; Asia and Europe.  The business is growing by the day, with a store in Tokyo set to open soon.

As an entrepreneur he’s grown in leaps and bounds, and despite many changes along the way, his sentiments on entrepreneurship remain.

“Inspiring potential entrepreneurs to develop an entrepreneurial mindset and embark on an entrepreneurial journey is one way of solving some of the world’s most critical problems, and freeing the economically marginalised,” Jo says.

Related: Two 20 Year Olds Reshape Entrepreneur Landscape With New Social Investment Platform

He urges young aspiring entrepreneurs with an entrepreneurial mindset to take the plunge and to channel time and energy into developing their business ideas into something tangible and workable that could generate good long-term financial returns.

“People will tell you that it can’t be done, but believe me, it can. All you have to do is to believe in your idea and to work hard and smart and you’ll reap the benefits,” Jo says.

 

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9 Ways Successful Entrepreneurs Spend Their Weekends

All work and no play makes for a very dull entrepreneur.

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Successful entrepreneurs have a passion for what they do, so working hard is part of their DNA. But anyone who is successful also recognises that life and work are a marathon, not a sprint. Even they need downtime on the weekend to ensure they’re up to the task of being creative problem solvers and innovators Monday through Friday.

Sure, they may spend some time catching up on administrative work. They may spend time on a big project that needs special attention. And they should definitely spend time thinking about the future and considering the big picture.

But what successful entrepreneurs don’t do is spend the entire weekend buried under work. We all need a break, and entrepreneurs are no less immune to burnout than anyone else. Their weekends are spent restoring their bodies and minds, and getting prepared to function optimally come Monday.

Here are nine things successful entrepreneurs do over the weekend to unwind and re-energise for the week ahead.

wake-up-routine

1. Wake up at about the same time

Successful entrepreneurs understand that staying on track for the week ahead means keeping the same sleeping patterns, even on weekends. That means going to bed and getting up at about the same time all week. This is because your circadian rhythm will stay consistent, so your body will naturally know when it’s time to sleep and wake up.

As tempting as it might be to sleep in, doing so can throw off your sleep/wake cycle, disrupting sleep patterns and giving you a poor night’s rest. Make sure you aim to get seven to eight hours of sleep every night to avoid a sleep deficit. Also, getting up early means you’ll be ready for whatever the day brings and you’ll have time to accomplish all the things you hope to do.

Related: 20 South African Side-Hustles You Can Start This Weekend

2. Spend quality time with loved ones

It’s no surprise that weekdays can be hectic and filled with obligations. There’s a good chance you spent more time in front of your computer (and with co-workers and colleagues) than with the most important people in your life. Make sure you’re tending to the quality relationships in your life by making them a priority on the weekends.

Have a date night with a partner. Go for a long walk or enjoy a leisurely lunch with a friend. Make sure you’re building and maintaining those relationships by really listening to them. And then share what’s on your mind and how you’re feeling. The support and connection you feel with others will give you resiliency and can support you in stressful times.

3. Pursue a passion

Is there some hobby or activity you’ve been wanting to try but have never made time for? Dedicate some weekend time to pursuing a passion that’s outside of work and beyond your normal day-to-day obligations. Maybe you’ve always wanted to learn to paint, take up photography or write a novel.

Whether it’s a long-lost hobby or a labor of love you’ve dreamed of embarking on, stop telling yourself that you’ll get around to it “someday.” Set aside a quiet weekend morning or afternoon to work on it. Pursuing your interests beyond work improves your mental health and reduce stress levels. Plus, focusing on activities outside of work will improve your creativity and give you a chance to look at life from a new perspective.

Related: How To Work Less And Still Get More Done

camping trip

4. Find time for a mini-adventure

Weekends give you a chance to unplug from life, put aside your daily responsibilities and go have some fun! Let loose and break out of your rut by taking yourself on a mini-adventure. Get out of the house and find a change of scenery.

A mini-adventure means sticking close to home, so hiking the Grand Canyon may be a bit much, but an overnight camping trip or a day hike is totally doable. Spend an afternoon at the beach or take your bike out for a long ride. The point is to get out and make a memory that will give you a smile for the rest of the week.

5. Fuel their creative mind

Successful entrepreneurs make sure they take time to feed their creative minds by finding ways to connect with the arts. You don’t need a degree in art appreciation or music theory to enjoy the benefits of engaging with the arts. Simply visiting a local museum or spending time listening to music will suffice.

Viewing art can be like a mini-vacation for your brain. It activates areas of the brain that are involved in processing emotion and engaging your pleasure and reward systems. Listening to music can have an even more dramatic effect. In fact, music has been found to stimulate more parts of the brain than any other human function.

6. Relax, reflect and renew

Savvy entrepreneurs have learned that they must give themselves the space and time to decompress and mull over the events, issues or dilemmas they face. Giving yourself time for self-reflection allows you to link and construct meaning from your experiences. Reflection is one of the main ways we gain insight and foster complex learning and personal growth.

In our busy world, we are often dealing with packed schedules and juggling multiple issues. Make sure you find time on the weekend to disengage from your hectic schedule and just chill. Try journaling, going for a walk, taking in the beauty of a sunset or even just focusing on the present moment and being aware of all the sensations you’re experiencing.

Related: Get Your Weekend Started

hiking

7. Get outside and exercise

Whether it’s getting out for a walk through the neighbourhood, shooting some hoops or taking a run through the park, high-achieving entrepreneurs get outside on the weekend to stretch their legs and soak up some vitamin D. There are some great benefits to an outdoor rather than indoor workout (although the most important thing is getting exercise, however it works best for you).

Getting some natural sunlight may be a welcome reprieve from artificial lighting if you spend most of the week in an office. Studies have found that adults tend to exercise for longer when they’re outside. You also tend to burn more calories and work slightly different muscles because of the wind resistance and changes in terrain. Perhaps most important, you’ll have a chance to admire nature and the outside world, which is good for your mental health and well-being.

8. Socialise and network

Successful entrepreneurs realise that any event or gathering is a chance to get to know other people and learn something new from someone you haven’t met. Set aside time to socialise with friends and family or get to know colleagues and workmates. If everyone else is busy this weekend, look for other opportunities to socialise and do something fun and interesting.

Check out a local community event. It could be a great chance to learn more about where you live and network and make connections with others. You could also look for a volunteer opportunity with a charity or nonprofit you’d like to support, such as a local animal shelter, senior centre or food bank. If you enjoy active sports, join a local team or club. If you’re into less strenuous activities, consider a joining a bowling or bocce ball team.

9. Catch up on rest

It’s been a busy week, and you’re feeling sleep deprived and run down. While sleeping in isn’t a good idea, successful entrepreneurs know when they need to catch up on some much-needed rest. A 10- to 20-minute power nap may be just the thing to help you feel refreshed and alert – a short snooze is actually much more effective than a cup of coffee in providing an energy boost.

It’s best to keep naps short: 30 Minutes or less. Longer naps are more likely to leave you feeling groggy and can interfere with your nighttime sleep quality. So when that wave of post-lunch sleepiness hits, go ahead: Indulge in an mid-afternoon nap and enjoy the rest of your weekend!

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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