Connect with us

Lessons Learnt

Author Of The Little Book of Inspiration Gives Great Advice On Having Direction And Courage

If you can keep learning along each step of the start-up journey, you’ll continue to grow, and your business will be a success, says entrepreneur and author, Matshona Dhliwayo.

Nadine Todd

Published

on

matshona-dhliwayo

Vital Stats

  • Player: Matshona Dhliwayo
  • About: Matshona Dhliwayo is a Zimbabwean-born and Canadian-based philosopher, entrepreneur, and author of books such as The Little Book of Inspiration, 100 Lessons Every Great Man Wants You to Know, and Lalibela’s Wise Man.
  • Twitter: @MatshonaD

What is the difference between a ‘learn it all’ entrepreneur, and a ‘know it all’ entrepreneur, and why is it imperative that a start-up strives to be the former?

A ‘learn it all’ is one who is driven by the desire to learn and a ‘know it all’ is one who is driven by the desire to prove how much he knows. It’s imperative that you focus on the former because, in life, we are only as successful as what we know. Knowledge is more than power, knowledge is wealth.

How can someone go about being a ‘learn it all’? First, be humble; humility allows you to learn from others. A humble student is better than a proud scholar.

Related: Relax Spas Founder Noli Mini Shares Her Insights On Building A Business Of Value

Energy is a great thing, but it needs direction. How can a start-up entrepreneur calm down, focus, and find their direction?

You find direction from having well-defined goals in a business plan. You keep a tab on those goals by using a daily planner to help you steadfastly execute your objectives. In good times, be cautious; in bad times, be hopeful; and in busy times, be level-headed, never taking your eyes off your goals.

Why is it important to have direction?

road-directionA chariot can’t travel in two directions, and when you know where you’re going it’s easier to get there. When you lose direction you lose opportunities, and when you lose opportunities you lose rewards.

What are the pitfalls and limitations of ego?

Ego is an inflated sense of self and is therefore no different from arrogance. The pitfalls of conceit, which shouldn’t be confused with confidence, are endless. You start thinking you are better than others and the moment you do, this means you can’t learn from them.

If you don’t learn you don’t grow, and if you don’t grow, you die. Most experienced entrepreneurs understand the importance of being humble because people buy from people they like, and people don’t like egotistical personalities. Humility opens people up to you, but arrogance drives them away. And the more people an entrepreneur draws the more people he can serve, and the more people he can serve, the more money he can make.

That said, a degree of arrogance allows you to push through the hardships. Where is the balance, and how do entrepreneurs find that balance without getting discouraged?

Only a few people in history like Julius Caesar and Nebuchadnezzar II rose to great heights with arrogance, but their very egotism destroyed them in the end. I prefer courage, not pride, because it rises from conviction; and also faith, not ego, because it rises from hope. These two have helped the weakest of men and women achieve the greatest feats. An entrepreneur must be filled with courage daily and emptied of hubris incessantly. The higher you rise with ego, the lower you will also descend in the end because of it.

Related: How To Build A Disruptive Attitude

Why should you never, ever feel threatened by someone smarter or with more skills than you? In fact, why should you be partnering, hiring or learning from these people?

I am never threatened by people who are smarter and better than me because I see them as gifts, and not as competition. I view them as assets, not threats, so I allow them to do what they do best, thereby benefiting from it. It also frees me so I can do what I do best. We can be Jacks of all trades but we can’t be masters of all disciplines. Partnering with people who are cleverer than you elevates you.

Many entrepreneurs trust the wrong people. Why does this happen, and what is the solution?

People are complex creatures. The best of us can’t always predict human behaviour. Entrepreneurs, like everyone else, make mistakes. What they should shy away from are the avoidable ones. My advice: Take time to get to know people. Do your due diligence. Ignorance is your opponent, fear is your enemy, vice is your adversary, virtue is your friend, and wisdom is your helper.

Nadine Todd is the Managing Editor of Entrepreneur Magazine, the How-To guide for growing businesses. Find her on Google+.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Lessons Learnt

Jimmy Choo’s Co-Founder Explains Why There Are No Small Jobs

Tamara Mellon shares the strategy that has helped her find new opportunities throughout her career.

Nina Zipkin

Published

on

tamara-mellon

The co-founder of Jimmy Choo, Tamara Mellon, believes that you can find inspiration and opportunity anywhere. All it takes is determination to keep going and a keen eye for observation.

Mellon began her career in the early 1990s working as an accessories editor for British Vogue. Always on the hunt for up-and-coming designers, she came across Jimmy Choo, a cobbler working in London’s East End.

She would commission him to create shoes for fashion shoots. They were so well received by readers that the pair realised they could expand beyond one-of-kind pieces for the pages of the magazine.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

Continue Reading

Lessons Learnt

6 Habits Long-Time Millionaires Rely On To Stay Rich

It’s a simple fact: Most millionaires have different habits than the average person. However, these habits are far from inaccessible; they improve one’s odds of finding success but can be adopted by just about anyone with a bit of concerted effort.

Timothy Sykes

Published

on

Prev1 of 7

jack-dorsey

To take that idea one step further, once someone has become successful, how do they stay successful? Here, I’d like to take a slightly longer-sighted look at the habits of millionaires, focusing not just on the habits that make them successful but the ones that help them stay successful over time. By cultivating these habits in your own life, you’ll be investing in your own sustained success over time.

Here are six habits of long-time millionaires:

Prev1 of 7

Continue Reading

Lessons Learnt

(Infographic) The Early Failures Of The Most Successful Billionaires

To help inspire readers who are frustrated, or worse, too anxious about the possibility of failing to try to chase their dreams, here is a list by GetVoIP that highlights some of the greatest success stories, and how it wouldn’t be possible without their greatest failure.

Reuben Yonatan

Published

on

steven-spielberg

If at first you don’t succeed, try try again. You’ve heard the phrase all your life, but how often did it actually inspire you to actually, well, try again? If you’re going to be a success, you’re going to meet with rejection or a significant loss a dozen times over before you “make it.” The one thing that major successes in business (not to mention politics, entertainment, and most other endeavours), have in common is the ability to pick themselves up after a failure and take what they’ve learned from it to their next venture.

Success is never a straight line from one to ten. It’s a roller coaster of small victories followed by defeats that seem twice as big. In the world of sports, the list of undefeated champions is very short. For every iPhone there’s a Newton. For every Star Wars, there’s both a Howard the Duck and a Star Wars Holiday Special.

Overcoming obstacles and reframing failure as just one step along the path to success is crucial to continued success in today’s business world. Failure is part of the experience of trying something new, and sometimes it won’t work out as well as you’d hoped, but the experience teaches you something that will be invaluable later on. That may sound pat or trite, but that’s the lesson you’ll hear from nearly every public figure you admire.

You’ve probably heard that Wayne Gretzky said, “You miss one hundred percent of the shots you don’t take.” But here’s something you don’t hear nearly as much: As many accolades as “The Great One” has made, in his best year (1983) his shot percentage was 26.7. Think about that. The biggest name in hockey missed three out of every four shots he took in the best year of his career, and in five years he missed nine out of ten.

Related: The Top 25 Self-Made Billionaires In the World

Failure Is a Necessary Journey

Here’s a similar statistic: Gordon Ramsay, a man best known for turning around failing restaurants, has owned 42 restaurants in his career—and 16 of them have closed. And who can forget that Halle Berry won awards for being both the best and worst actress in the same year?

Failure is part of the journey, and you are in great company if you fail at something you were sure was going to change the world. So, by all means, take your shot. And if you hit the mark 25% of the time, you can consider yourself a huge success.

To help inspire readers who are frustrated, or worse, too anxious about the possibility of failing to try to chase their dreams, here is a list by GetVoIP that highlights some of the greatest success stories, and how it wouldn’t be possible without their greatest failure.

billionaire-early-career-failures-infographic

Related: 6 Unlikely Characteristics Common Among Billionaires

Continue Reading
Advertisement

SPOTLIGHT

Advertisement

Recent Posts

Follow Us

Entrepreneur-Newsletters
*
We respect your privacy. 
* indicates required.
Advertisement

Trending