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How tashas Built A Recession Proof Business

When tashas was started in 2005, it had all the makings of a trendy yet unremarkable lifestyle business. Founder Natasha Sideris had no grand ambitions – she simply wanted to create a cosy lunchtime café that would cater to a neglected market. Short on cash, she even had to borrow from loansharks, because her lack of experience ruled out other funding options. So how did she turn a simple café into a brand that not only attracted the interest of a listed company, but is now also going global and is often referred to in Famous Brands circles as recession-proof?

GG van Rooyen

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Vital Stats

  • Player: Natasha Sideris
  • Brand: tashas
  • Established: 2005
  • Visit: tashascafe.com

Natasha Sideris is not a chef. Nor does she have any desire to be one. She is an entrepreneur. More particularly, she is a restauranteur. Sadly, in the age of the celebrity chef, the crucial (and challenging) role of the restauranteur is often overlooked. Running a restaurant is incredibly hard. At its core, a restaurant is a business — one in which exceptional customer service and constant innovation is crucial — which is why so many new restaurants fail.

Sideris has overcome the challenges associated with starting a restaurant to create a brand that is utterly unique. Like many successful franchises, tashas grew from a small sole operation into a large organisation, but unlike many other brands, it has retained its soul. tashas Is not your typical franchise. In many ways, a tashas restaurant has as much in common with an independent operation as it does with a franchise.

How did Sideris manage it — how did she create a franchise that feels unique and offers a surprisingly intimate experience, but has also proven itself to be scalable and globally appealing? The journey hasn’t been easy, but it has been rewarding.

Related: Sigma Capital Is Built On Not Settling For Less

Challenge one: Finding a niche

tashas-restaurant-layout

The restaurant industry is an incredibly crowded one, which means it can be difficult to establish a new operation. There are foodies out there who enjoy testing new restaurants, but the average customer isn’t terribly adventurous. Very often, customers stick to what they know. This, at least, is a popular opinion within the industry, and one that causes many new restauranteurs to resort to a franchise business, as opposed to an independent operation.

The franchise option makes sense. It offers a proven business model that brings with it a built-in customer base, which is why franchises in general tend to fail with less frequency than independent operations.

But Sideris doesn’t agree that franchising is necessarily the only option. Sure, franchising makes sense, but there is space for independent operations as well.

“More than ever, I think there is a desire for restaurants that offer unique experiences,” says Sideris. “People in general are more knowledgeable about food and hospitality trends today than they were in the past, and they are now always on the lookout for a place that offers something new and innovative. Franchises will always be popular, but I do think the modern dining landscape leaves a lot of space for independent operations.”

Despite owning a franchise restaurant at the time (a Nino’s), Sideris started tashas in 2005 because she identified a gap in the market that no franchise operation — or independent operation, for that matter — was filling.

“I saw that there was a demand for a lunchtime restaurant that offered exquisite food, a trendy environment and great service,” says Sideris. “No one was really catering to that market at the time, and I knew there was a promising business there.”

Challenge two: A lack of funding

tashas-restaurant

Identifying a business opportunity is one thing, getting hold of the funding necessary to pursue that opportunity is quite another. Most lending institutions will only consider a start-up loan if the entrepreneur has considerable assets that could be offered up as collateral. Franchises, meanwhile, typically demand that franchisees provide 50% of the required start-up capital in the form of unencumbered funds. The reason is simple: Access to funds matters. Under-capitalisation is one of the main reasons many businesses fail.

So where does that leave entrepreneurs who don’t have adequate funds? Sideris — desperate to realise her dream but without the money needed — was forced to resort to extreme measures. She approached what might be charitably referred to as ‘unofficial lending institutions’, but could more accurately be described as loan sharks.

With no bank willing to look at her, it was a strategy that she was forced to resort to no less than three times: First when she opened her original Nino’s restaurant in Bedfordview, then when she opened her first tashas in Athol in 2005, and finally when she converted her Nino’s into the second tashas in 2007.

It is a ‘solution’ with obvious risks, and not one that she would recommend. “The first tashas was under-financed by about R1,8 million. By the time it opened, I was in a very deep hole. Clawing myself out of it required incredibly hard work. Fourteen-hour days were the norm,” she says.

However, she doesn’t believe that a lack of funding should deter entrepreneurs from pursuing their dreams.

“Money helps, but you can get very far with hard work, tenacity and ingenuity. Don’t let money put you off. Too many entrepreneurs feel that they can’t pursue their dreams because they don’t have money. That’s just not true. If you’re willing to work extremely hard, you can make it happen.”

Related: Copeland Stables – Charné Gerber The Friesian Horse Breeder

Challenge three: Delivering a premium experience

tashas-founder

Right from the outset, Sideris knew that tashas should offer a premium dining experience — yet another reason she needed a lot of capital to get the restaurant going. As mentioned, she wanted the food, setting and service to all be of the highest quality. Accomplishing this required a fanatical attention to detail.

“Even today, I test and greenlight every single dish before it finds its way onto a tashas menu,” she says. “I also demand that only the best ingredients be used, and that absolutely everything be freshly prepared once ordered. Nothing is pre-made.”

This is an approach that one would hardly imagine lends itself to franchising, but the strategy went unchanged even when tashas was partially purchased by Famous Brands in 2008.

Sideris has maintained the same level of quality by selecting franchisees very carefully, and by offering far more training than you’ll find in the average franchise operation.

“With most franchises, head office will typically spend about a week in a store once it opens. We spend no less than six weeks in the business. When a tashas was opened in Dubai in 2014, I spent three months there. If you want people to really adopt your way of doing things, you need to expose them to it consistently. Once you’ve trained someone to do something in a particular way for six weeks, they’ll keep doing it once you’re gone.”

Of course, providing a premium product or service is expensive, which brings with it its own set of challenges. Rising costs and the weakening of the rand in particular is currently placing a lot of pressure on local restaurants.

“Not that long ago, an avocado cost R6. Today, a top-quality one costs about R22. If a restaurant charges a customer R60 for it, it might seem as if that offers a good chunk of profit. However, once you subtract labour costs, rent, furnishings, electricity and water, you’re not left with very much. The fact of the matter is, many restaurants are struggling to make ends meet,” says Sideris.

What are the options? The first is to up prices, and the second is to compromise on quality. Compromising the tashas experience is not something that Sideris is willing to do, which means that she has been forced to increase prices.

“We’ve upped prices recently,” says Sideris. “But you can’t pass all price increases on to the consumer. Over the last few months, our suppliers have increased prices twice, while we’ve only done it once. Like most businesses, we’ve been forced to absorb a significant amount of the costs.”

If you’re going to increase prices, you also need to be cognisant of the fact that customers will become increasingly demanding.

“If you’re going to increase prices, you need to provide an even better service and experience than before. You can’t ask more and then let the product take a dip in quality. Customers rightfully won’t stand for that.”

Challenge four: Franchising the business

tashas-franchise-business

When Sideris started tashas, she had no intention of ever franchising the business. In truth, franchising never even seemed like a possibility. An upmarket lunchtime café had little in common with the restaurants and fast-food operations that were typically franchised.

But fate intervened in the form of Kevin Hedderwick, CEO of Famous Brands. “I had known Kevin since about 2001,” says Sideris. “He was a regular customer at my Nino’s in Bedfordview, which I later converted into a tashas. When my second restaurant had been up and running for about a year, he approached me and asked me what my plans for the future were. I wasn’t sure what to say, and in any case, I didn’t think that a listed company would ever be interested in a small operation like mine.”

But Hedderwick was serious. Famous Brands was very interested in partnering tashas. Sideris, however, was reluctant.

“I didn’t want to franchise. I couldn’t imagine giving up control of the food and design of the restaurants,” says Sideris.

She struggled with the decision for no less than eight months. “Famous Brands was very patient with me,” Sideris laughs. “I was so afraid to make a decision.”

In the end, though, Sideris did agree to sell a majority stake in tashas to Famous Brands. The company acquired a 51% share in the brand, but she retained her two stores as a franchisee. Immediately, Sideris was in the unique position of being both franchisor and franchisee. It was clear that this would not be your typical franchise operation.

“Having my own stores has been very useful,” says Sideris. “It helps me to understand the challenges that franchisees deal with.”

Read more on Famous Brands: Kevin Hedderwick here.

Why did she finally agree to sell?

“It all came down to my belief in Kevin. He had a vision, and I knew that I could trust him. I knew he would allow me to retain the kind of control I was looking for,” she says.

Challenge five: Growing the brand

tashas-logo-nicolway

The approach that Sideris has taken to growing the tashas brand is very different from that typically used with franchise restaurants and fast-food outlets.

While she demands consistency in the quality of the food and the level of service, each of the locations is unique, while at the same time retaining the DNA of the tashas brand. This is mostly shown through the tashas design elements that inform both the interior design and the ‘Inspired By’ menu.

“If every tashas was exactly like the next one, I think people would get bored. Customers want unique experiences. I always compare the tashas restaurants to a group of close friends — they’re similar but still unique,” she says.

With this in mind, tashas makes use of a 30/70 rule, whereby 30% of the food and design of each store has to be the same as the other restaurants, but 70% can be different.

“I came up with the idea of giving each restaurant its own unique look and feel that would appeal to the local clientele. So, tashas Melrose, which is situated in the very upmarket Melrose Arch, is inspired by salmon, champagne and oysters. tashas Brooklyn in Pretoria has a Dutch Huguenot vibe, while tashas Hyde Park has a Parisian feel.”

While most franchise operations tend to operate under the belief that more is better, Sideris and Famous Brands have made the surprising decision to limit the number of local locations to the relatively small number of 15.

“I don’t think the local market can really support more tashas restaurants. There is a limit to the number of suitable locations,” says Sideris. “tashas isn’t like other franchise operations where success lies in scaling as quickly as possible. tashas has fewer locations, but higher turnover.”

Where does that leave the future of the brand? The answer lies in heading overseas. “We made the decision a few years ago to expand the brand internationally. We looked at two markets in particular: Australia and Dubai,” says Sideris. “At first glance, Australia seemed like a great idea, since it is very similar to South Africa.”

What gave Sideris pause, however, was the long distances and time differences involved. “I was worried about the logistics of setting up a restaurant so far from home. The time difference would make it hard to communicate, and, should there be a sudden emergency, getting there wouldn’t be easy,” she says. “Because of this, Dubai made more sense. There’s no great time difference and it’s only eight hours away.”

Also, Dubai proved to be surprisingly similar to South Africa in many ways. It had the same mall and restaurant culture that South Africa is famous for.

tashas Dubai opened in 2014 and was an instant success. “We were blown away by how well tashas was received in Dubai,” says Sideris. “It showed us that we have a brand that has international appeal.”

What’s next for the brand? More restaurants are already in the works for Dubai. After that, opening tashas in Australia and the UK seems like an inevitability.

Read Next: Work Smarter Says Matsi Modise

GG van Rooyen is the deputy editor for Entrepreneur Magazine South Africa. Follow him on Twitter.

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Lessons Learnt

Founder of Five-Star Wes Boshoff Weighs In On Becoming An Entrepreneur

Here are Wes Boshoff’s seven lessons in building a brand that matters, offering your clients something of worth, and always following your passions.

Nadine Todd

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A lot of starting a business is just winging it. Call it the hustle, faking it ‘till you make it or biting off more than you can chew (and then chewing like hell), the reality is the same: Doing what you can, when you can to get yourself and your business out there so that you can build a brand with longevity.

As a start-up, does your vision push the boundaries? Are you putting everything you have into achieving something great? Here are seven lessons to help you (and your business) reach full potential.

1. Seize the day

Wes began his career in the people development industry. He was involved in high-impact training and developmental coaching, and entrepreneurship couldn’t have been further from his mind. “I had no appetite for going solo,” he recalls.

Related: Failure Is Not An Option – Or Is It? Your How To On How To

“I was employed but doing some part-time coaching on the side, and while this may have seemed like a springboard into entrepreneurship, I’ve always viewed start-ups as requiring three key things: Timing, opportunity and experience. Experience in particular was a stumbling block for me. I was young. I didn’t feel like I’d earned real credibility or had enough life experience to offer real value to others. Who would listen to me? I was just Wes.”

And then an opportunity presented itself and Wes decided to take the plunge anyway. “After becoming an expert in behaviour and personality profiling, I was asked to join a project management company. About a year into joining them they shut down.”

Facing unemployment, Wes decided to take the plunge and never work for a boss again. Instead, he seized the opportunity to launch his own business and brand.

And so, Five-Star was born, a brand that sought to help businesses improve their customer service by first focusing on their employees. Wes decided to cut his teeth in the hospitality arena, where customer service is the life-blood of the industry.

The lesson: There is no perfect time to start a business. There will always be excuses to put it off. You will never be 100% ready. And yet, until you’ve taken that first step, you can’t start testing your model in the market, tweaking and adjusting your offering to suit your audience. If your dream is to become an entrepreneur, don’t look for all the reasons why you shouldn’t take the plunge, but focus on the one reason why you should.

2. Don’t wait for business to find you

When Wes launched Five-Star, he had no savings to invest in the business and no assets. He had himself and his experiences. “I didn’t spend time on a business plan or money on getting a website up and running — that would all come later. I spent what I could afford on business cards, and hit the streets. I believed I could tell my story better than a website could, and so I focused on getting myself in front of the people I needed to sell my services to.”

Wes’ first call was to the GM of one of the fastest growing hotel groups in the country. “I introduced myself as Wes from Five-Star, told him I’d heard a lot about how good his hotel was, and that I’d love to take him out for coffee to discuss what would take them to a ten. I didn’t sell anything over the phone — I wanted a face-to-face meeting, and the opportunity to share real value. I wanted him to see why we should work together, rather than make a hard sell.”

Wes is an expert in hospitality, training and customer service. But he was also winging it. During the coffee meeting he was asked to do a mystery guest assessment, to uncover which areas could be improved upon. “I asked him if he’d like me to use their report or mine, and thank goodness he said theirs, since I didn’t have one.” Nine years later, that hotel group is Wes’ longest-standing client.

This is the tactic Wes has used to build his business and brand ever since: He focuses on face-to-face meetings, sharing his story, who he is and what he’s learnt, and really listening to his clients’ challenges so that he can offer advice and add value — even if they don’t end up doing business together.

The lesson: Entrepreneurs make things happen for themselves. Wes personally does not like cold calls, and so he’s found a sales strategy that works for him. How you sell isn’t as important as the fact that you are out there, selling yourself, your business and the solutions you can offer. If you aren’t out there selling, you’ll never build a sustainable start-up.

3. Make the most of tools

wes-boshoff-five-star

The report that the hotel gave Wes for his first mystery guest assessment became the template for a report he built for himself. Over the years he has developed numerous tools, building on his experience with Discus and other methodologies to create frameworks for his motivational talks, training and coaching programmes.

“In the early days I couldn’t afford to purchase tools, so I had to really listen to my clients and develop what they needed. There are so many resources available to us today. You just need to do your research, know your industry and be constantly tweaking your offering based on what works best.”

In Wes’ own words, he’s not a book smarts guy, but a street smarts guy. “It’s why a business plan didn’t work for me — I needed to be out there, testing my model and my theories, and tweaking and adjusting my offering. I paid my school fees, and used those learnings to develop the tools I needed to deliver results.

Related: The Journey Of Entrepreneurship: How The Tough Get Going

“I love developing models. Applied knowledge is power. But don’t overcomplicate things. There’s a simple process to learning and development: The stages of knowledge start with a revelation, new knowledge, followed by realisation — making it real — and finally a revolution, which leads to purpose and progress. That’s what I help people to do — create perspectives, interrogate the perspective, and then affect real change in their lives and businesses.”

The lesson: The more open you are to learning and adjusting your solutions, the more you’ll be able to offer to your clients. Any tools you can develop to add to the overall experience are value-adds that benefit yourself and your clients.

4. Add value before you add an invoice

Wes is a born networker. He loves meeting new people, sharing his story, and finding out more about the people he’s networking with. He’s also very good at uncovering the challenges they face and offering solutions, even if those solutions aren’t one of the products he offers.

“When you increase your network, you increase your net worth. I believe in being the go-to guy for my clients. I want them to feel comfortable picking up the phone and asking my advice on anything. I believe great businesses and brands are built when you add value before you add an invoice.”

This has been Wes’ motto throughout his career, long before he launched his own business. “I’ve always put my hand up when a new challenge or task has presented itself. I don’t believe in constantly looking for what’s wrong in what’s right. Face the reality, and determine the best way to get the opportunity out of the obstacle. You need to choose to be opportunistic. I’m a realist, but that doesn’t mean I want to live in a negative environment.

“I’ve brought this attitude to everything I do, including how I view my clients’ businesses. It’s not about what I can get from them, but what I can add to them. Some of this I can charge for, but valuable advice should be freely given. I believe in cultivating an opportunistic mindset; and I want to help my clients and their employees to do the same.”

The lesson: As an entrepreneur, you need to walk the talk. If you truly care about your customers, add real value without always expecting something in return. You’ll build long-term relationships built on trust and mutual respect.

5. Don’t lose Focus

It’s a common problem amongst start-up entrepreneurs. Early wins leave you feeling overly confident and eager for more. It’s at this stage that many business owners start looking for new challenges, and where else they can divest their energy for new and exciting wins.

For Wes, this diversion was cars. “I’d been accepted into the Branson Centre for Entrepreneurship, but instead of focusing on Five-Star, I was looking for a way to combine my passion for cars with business.”

Related: 8 Entrepreneurs Share Their Best Advice For When The Going Gets Tough

What Wes found was Plastic Dip, a US-based product used to wrap cars. “I stopped focusing on Five-Star and launched Plastispray,” he recalls. “I had this massive vision, with not much support. I forgot the cardinal rule that I’d learnt in Samuel Chand’s book, Who’s Holding Your Ladder, and that’s the importance of support. We might be the sole founders of our businesses, but that doesn’t mean we don’t need support systems. Who is holding your ladder? Who won’t get bored and walk away?

“I ended up in a situation where my focus was completely scattered, I wasn’t managing my personal life, and the business I was trying to build just didn’t have legs. I even landed this incredible project, building a Mini Cooper for the launch of Virgin Mobile. We turned it into a photo-booth and broke a world record for the most people squeezed into a Mini — which was 25.

“I thought, that’s it, after this project, the business will just take off. And nothing happened. It opened no doors.”

It was a hard lesson to learn, and one that took its toll on Wes emotionally. “2013 was the lowest year of my life,” he says. “I started seeing a psychologist, and spent 2014 rebuilding myself. I realised I needed to work on my attitude, my fears and my business. I also needed to learn how to focus again. We can’t achieve anything in life if we aren’t focused.

“I failed hard, but it also gave me perspective. When you learn you win — which means that failure isn’t actually losing. It’s important to understand that, and it’s what pushed me through the tough times. Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn.”

Once Wes regrouped and renewed his focus on Five-Star, the business started taking off. “People outside of the hospitality industry started asking me for help. I was invited to speak at international leadership conferences, and work with businesses on turnaround strategies. From there the business has just grown from strength to strength.”

The lesson: Focus is essential. It’s easy to get distracted and chase the next trend or hot idea, but real success takes time to build, and sticking to anything long-term takes focus. The more focused you are, the higher your chances of success.

6. Understand your brand

For nine years Wes has operated the business under the Five-Star name. The longer he’s been in the industry however, the clearer it’s become that his brand isn’t the business, it’s himself, and his ideas.

“I’m always, unapologetically, ‘just Wes’,” he says. “You’ll never be everything to everyone. The best thing you can be is authentic. Some people will love you, others won’t. That’s okay. Just be true to yourself. I’m not a suits guy. I arrive how I am, share my story, my lessons, and give the best advice I can. I share tools and tips to become the best version of you. I wouldn’t be able to do that if I wasn’t completely myself when I work with my clients.”

It’s for this reason that Wes has recently rebranded the business to ‘Wes’, with the tagline, Imagine Thinking. It’s an ideal closely linked with his talks, his philosophy, and his name in the market. “I’m becoming a thought leader, and that comes with risks,” he says. “When you put yourself out there, you need to have enough confidence for people to disagree with you, because that’s hard. Not everyone will like what you’re saying or agree with you on a particular issue. You put yourself out there in the public domain and if you aren’t sure of who you are and what you stand for, insecurities can come to haunt you.

“I tell everyone I speak to, ‘disagree with everything I say…’ I can’t change the way people think, or what they think — I just want to challenge them to think for a change. I want you to consider your opinions and question them. Imagine thinking. Thinking is a verb. You have to do something — you need to disagree to set your own thoughts in motion. Be brave; share your thoughts so that we all benefit together.

“I used to take myself seriously; I don’t anymore. I don’t want to offend, but I’m okay if you don’t agree with me.”

The lesson: Your personal and business brands tell a story. They let your customers know who you are, what you stand for, and what your values are. People do business with people, not companies, so don’t be afraid to authentically share your story.

Related: How To Start A Business With (Almost) No Money

7. Have a vision that scares you

For Wes, too many organisations have a vision that’s external and designed for clients. But he believes vision is an internal thing. “As an entrepreneur, your vision should be for you and your employees. It should be your guiding light. It’s your future, and it should consistently grow.

“If you don’t achieve your vision, it’s because you don’t have an appetite for the mission. If you’re only looking two to five years into the future, that’s a goal, not a vision. Your vision should scare you. It should wake you up and keep you up. It should drive you.”

“The mission is how you achieve the vision. You need to know what it will take to get there, and this usually includes a lot of hard work, stress, fear, and living on the edge. But that’s okay, because we’re designed to stretch ourselves. That’s when we discover our full potential.”

The lesson: Don’t ever be too scared to think big. Thinking small isn’t what entrepreneurs are built for. Big hairy audacious goals (or BHAGs) are the foundation of successful, game changing businesses — and successful, fulfilled entrepreneurs.

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Lessons Learnt

Successful People Always Chase the Impossible – Here’s Why

Achieving perfection may never happen, but the attempt can lead to results you never imagined.

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Vince Lombardi said it best: “We will chase perfection, knowing all the while we can never attain it. But along the way, we shall catch excellence.”


Successful people are always in the chase for perfection. As Lombardi knew, however, and as I’ve discovered more than once myself, what we chase is often very different from what we catch.

Early in my career, I planned on being a pharmacist, then making partner at a PR firm. Both goals were within reach, but I never caught them — as they came close I found myself rethinking my ambitions, then changing direction. I had to let go of the goals that had motivated me for years, and find different ones, chasing perfection in new and often unexpected ways.

If you are looking to catch the best in excellence, while not letting yourself get boxed in by chasing perfection, it is important to remember a few key guidelines.

Changing your path isn’t failing

Successful people – and entrepreneurs especially – are driven by their goals. It’s a fine line, though, between goals that inspire and goals that trap. The best stories about entrepreneurs are full of fresh starts and unexpected detours. If you find yourself disliking what you’re doing, or feeling frustrated even when things are going well, think about making a new plan.

Changing your path isn’t bad or wrong or failing – it’s simply a new choice, and often the right one.

Related: 7 Rules To Master Your Start-Up Success This Year

Never perceive anything as a setback

Circumstances can spiral out of control – plans tank, products fail, companies come apart. When something is running off the road you can be consumed by it, or you can realise that what you took to heart before isn’t your reality anymore, and the seeming chaos around you disguises a new reality. Don’t beat yourself up about it, don’t mourn the wasted time and the discarded mission. Negative experiences aren’t a setback, they’re a chance to make new decisions that are right for you.

However bad the situation, there’s always an angle

bad-situationWhen things get rough, take five minutes and give free rein to let it all out. Find a private place, get mad or cry, let whatever’s struggling inside you get out. Then get to work finding the angle. There’s always an angle, and a path forward to success. Usually, it involves getting over yourself. Whatever your emotions, stop thinking it’s about you.

Recognise that you’re in service to something larger than yourself – your company, your staff, the people who depend on you. That’s where you’ll find the angle you need, beyond your emotions, and outside of yourself.

Related: Elon Musk’s Formula For Successfully Growing Companies Faster

Success looks different to different people

We can all relate to the true believer who challenges conventional wisdom and beats the odds. When we make these challenges, our parents, bosses, society at large – insert appropriate authority figure – sometimes just won’t see it our way. But often it’s our own internal schoolmaster that’s the barrier we need to overcome. We persist in judging ourselves by standards that once seemed essential, but have outlived their usefulness. In fact, there are many different ways to succeed. The important thing is being comfortable with knowing there is more than one right answer.

It’s a never-ending experience

Is it ever time to stop chasing perfection? No. Chasing perfection is the opposite of a hamster wheel or rat race. It’s about your never-ending pursuit of happiness. The sooner in life that we master the flexible mindset needed for continuous evolution, the better.

My career has had enough twists and turns all ready to make a running back proud. At those times when I had no control over my external situation, I could see that the one path I thought I would take wasn’t the only path – or even the right path.

Related: To Be Successful Stay Far Away From These 7 Types of Toxic People

I’ve never come close to attaining perfection, but Mr. Lombardi was right. By chasing it, from my days studying to be a pharmacist to my current role as VP of Marketing and Communications at Intel, I’ve caught excellence again and again along the way.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

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Company Posts

Why Grit Is The True Determining Factor Of Success

How grit and determination helped Bertus Albertse take control of his destiny and build an award-winning franchise brand.

Body20 franchise

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Vital Stats

  • Player:Bertus Albertse
  • Company: Body20
  • Established:2014
  • Contact:+27 (0)872310359
  • Visit: body20.co.za

What does it take to open a successful business, franchise it, and then take it global? In many instances, the answer is grit, determination and the ability to get back up when life knocks you down.

In fact, Angela Lee Duckworth, an academic and psychologist based at the University of Pennsylvania, where she studies concepts such as self-control and grit to determine how they might predict academic and professional success, believes that the single biggest predictor of success isn’t social intelligence, good looks, physical health or even IQ.

The single biggest predictor of success is grit.

According to Duckworth, grit is passion and perseverance for very long-term goals. It’s having stamina. Grit is sticking with your future, day in, day out, not just for the week or the month, but for

Years. It’s about working hard to make that future a reality. Grit is living life like it’s a marathon, not a sprint.

Related: The Wolf Within Bertus Albertse: Body20’s CEO

Finding self-worth

To find the epitome of grit, we need look no further than Bertus Albertse, the founder and CEO of Body20 Global, a local franchise that is now making international waves.

As a youngster, Bertus was used to living in the unpredictable. His parents divorced when he was just nine months old and his mother, walking with both him and his sister on her hips, moved from house to house whenever his alcoholic grandfather took to the rod.

He realised early in his life that material things come and go as his mother had to return worn clothes and used toys not long after they have been purchased.

In fact, it happened so often that at some point even Bertus and his sister had to return items at retail stores at a young age in order to have money for food or petrol.

“To this day I’ve never forgotten where I come from and how retailers looked at me and my sister with pity and shame in their eyes,” he recalls.

Going the distance

Instead of letting the experience bow him down, Bertus learnt to be comfortable with the uncomfortable, taking control and responsibility over his own life. As an excelling young sportsman, he soon realised how he could control his own destiny by consistently putting in huge effort.

One of his favourite quotes is “You are what you repeatedly do, therefore excellence is not an act but rather a habit.”

It’s a mantra he lives by. Through pure grit and determination, he went from a small, skinny kid from the ‘platteland’ in the West Coast to be the first Head Boy of both the school and boy’s residents at the prestigious high school, Jan van Riebeeck, situated in the heart of Cape Town.

Related: From Body20 Member To Franchisee Of The Year 2017

Stay hungry and make a real impact

Bertus also has numerous sports achievements, including national and international Body Building and Fitness titles. With his passionate and optimistic outlook on life, he soon realised that people are drawn to the ideas and things that inspire him and this has given him a flair for business, enabling him to share that passion with his community.

He started his first business in his second year of University in Stellenbosch with a R20 000 loan from his father, which he subsequently paid back three months later.

Today, Bertus is the founder and CEO of the award-winning global fitness franchise network, Body20. He strives to impact those around him by inspiring them to take control of their lives and encourages people to believe in the impossible, but to always remember to take consistent, daily actions to make it possible.

“A rabbit will always outrun the fox, because while the fox runs for its lunch the rabbit runs for its life.” He likes to be reminded of how hungry you have to be to truly make an impact in the world.

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