Connect with us

Lessons Learnt

RocoMamas Founder Brian Altriche On Fabulous Failures And Visualising Success

RocoMamas founder Brian Altriche is no stranger to failure. His first franchise left him in debt, he lost almost his entire life’s savings on the stock market, he got squeezed out of one business and sued by Red Bull in another… the list goes on. And yet in each case he’s learnt and implemented vital lessons that have culminated in the runaway success of South Africa’s favourite smart casual phenomenon.

Nadine Todd

Published

on

RocoMamas Brian Altriche

Vital stats

  • Player: Brian Altriche
  • Company: RocoMamas
  • Launched: 2014
  • Visit: RocoMamas.com

Like many successful individuals, Brian Altriche experienced a life-changing event in his mid-20s. A car accident left him with a broken leg and a broken arm, stranded in hospital over Christmas and New Year’s Eve. He’d also suffered a head injury, and while the time in hospital was making him re-evaluate his life path, the concussion had altered him in a subtle but significant way.

He became obsessed with visualisation: Visualising his life path, what a brand should look like, how customers would experience a particular offering — nothing happened until he visualised it down to the tiniest detail.

Twenty years later this fanatical relationship with the power of visualisation would lead directly to the launch of RocoMamas, arguably one of the most successful new brands in South Africa’s restaurant industry and the leader in fast casual dining.

Altriche has taken his concept from three stores to 49 in 18 months, and is spearheading South Africa’s renewed love affair with the burger.

Related: From the Frying Pan into the Fire: The Story of Ocean Basket

So how does a kid who attended 11 different schools, and has no education beyond matric, launch such a successful and universally loved brand?

The answer lies in the details, and in learning from what Altriche himself calls his ‘fabulous failures.’Altriche left South Africa after matric to airbrush Harleys and leather jackets on Hollywood Boulevard in Los Angeles. The late 80s and early 90s were a time of change.

The Berlin Wall came down, the Cold War ended, Nelson Mandela was released from prison and apartheid was coming to an end. Altriche wanted to be a part of something, and returning home to a new South Africa seemed the most obvious choice.

He moved to Yeoville and started painting signage for restaurants. This soon grew into any and all branding that restaurants needed. Altriche had no tertiary qualifications, but he was creative, and a fast learner. He was paying attention to branding and marketing, and figuring out what customers responded to. And then his accident happened. Two changes followed.

First, he decided to go into the restaurant game himself

rocomamas-owner

“It was the ideal business model. A small stock holding, because everything is perishable. No debtors. Once your customer is through the door you take the order, manufacture, distribute and charge for it, and get paid, all within an hour. The trick is to get the customer into your store.”

Second was the focus on visualisation

“After the accident my memory changed,” he says. “I need to see something to understand and remember it. Before we opened our first RocoMamas store I obsessively walked through the entire concept in my mind: what did the store look like, smell like, sound like? What did the food look like and taste like? What was the customer’s experience from the moment they walked through the door until they left? Every detail lived inside my head before we began.”

But Altriche also had almost two decades of experience under his belt, and a few hard-won lessons, thanks to failures that were essential to his overall success — starting with his very first foray into franchising.

“I opened a Longhorn Steakhouse in Pretoria. It was a lead balloon,” he says. “My gut told me the location wasn’t right, but I didn’t listen. On paper it looked great — a good suburban, high-LSM area. Once I opened, it quickly became apparent that there were no office parks in the area, which meant no lunch trade, and the residents were primarily retirees whose kids had left the house. This was not the right demographic for my steakhouse.”

Related: 10 SA Entrepreneurs Who Built Their Businesses From Nothing

Through sheer grit and determination Altriche hung on for a year. And he paid his school fees

“I learnt how to run on a lean staff, about stock holdings, operations, and the make-or-break power of location.”

Finally, he gave up, accepted his losses and got out of his lease, thanks to the landlord reneging on a contract clause.

“Failure is part of the equation of success. I call them my fabulous failures. You can’t achieve greatness without failures and risk.”

Armed with a sizeable debt, Altriche took his equipment and approached Fats Lazarides, who at the time had opened five Ocean Baskets. Altriche would be his first franchisee.

“I opened in Southgate. The lessons I had learnt were valuable with the second business. Thanks to Ocean Basket I paid off my debt, had a nice living wage, and walked away with R240 000 in profit when I sold it in 1998.”

Altriche isn’t scared of working hard, and he’s always on the look-out for a new challenge

rocomamas-fast-food-franchise

During his tenure with Ocean Basket, he found a partner and launched Passionade, a pre-mixed passionfruit and lemonade soft-drink in a can. The partnership did not end well, with Altriche squeezed out of the business.

“I didn’t hold a grudge,” he says. “For them it was just business. It would have hurt me far more than them to hold on to anger and disappointment.”

Running two businesses had taken its toll. Altriche arrived at the office at 6.30am and worked until 10am, then he’d open the Ocean Basket, return to the office, go back to the restaurant for the lunch trade, back to the office, and finally close up the store.

Related: Grant Rushmere Is Going Bos With Iced Tea

One day a case of energy drinks arrived for him to sample for the store, and Altriche was hooked

brian-altriche-rocomamas-franchise-south-africa

“I was exhausted, and those energy drinks really helped. I realised there was a definite market for that product.”

He found a chemist in the UK who could create a formula with Taurine as its active ingredient, secured a funding partner in South Africa, and called the energy drink Mad Bull. In 1998 he sold his Ocean Basket store to concentrate fully on the energy drink. It was a mistake. “I hadn’t taken into account that the Ocean Basket store gave me a great living wage that was suddenly absent when I started running a start-up. To this day I regret selling that store.”

But what’s done is done, and Altriche doesn’t believe in dwelling on things you can’t change. Instead, he threw himself into Mad Bull and GoGirl, a sugar-free version of the energy drink aimed at female consumers.

And then Red Bull sued over naming rights. Altriche and his partners lost, and Mad Bull was renamed Mad Buzz. It was the beginning of the end for the brand, not because of the name change, but due to corporate decisions made as a result of the court case and the money lost while fighting Red Bull.

Altriche, a gut-feel entrepreneur who relies on reading the market’s pulse and responding to consumer needs, did not see eye-to-eye with the MBA-educated marketing representative of the private equity majority owner of the brand.

To recoup losses, the decision was made to rebrand along with the name change. Altriche vehemently opposed the move.

“When you launch a brand, there’s a marketing curve,” he explains. “First you capture your outliers, your cult followers. They are critical to the success of your brand. They need to go the distance with you, even as you gain mass appeal. They’re influencers. With RocoMamas, they have been influential on social media. The same was true of Mad Bull, and then Mad Buzz. We had a fun, edgy marketing campaign for the name change, with street pole ads that said: ‘SA’s first Bull Fight’. Our early adopters loved it. They saw Red Bull as the bully.

“The shift in direction happened too soon. There’s a critical moment in every brand’s growth curve when you move from early adopters, to early mass market, to mainstream or general mass market. The key is not to lose your early customers. They need to feel appreciated and heard. They’re big influencers, particularly if you haven’t reached general mass market level yet.

“We shifted focus and lost them. We had a sizeable stake in the local market — about 15% — but not enough to lose our early adopters. I didn’t agree with the direction we were taking, and wasn’t adding anything to the new vision. I sold my share to my partners and moved on.”

Altriche sold Ocean Basket before he was 30, and a few short years later had his biggest failure to date. By that time he was in his early 30s, he’d lost two brands he’d created, he’d had a failed restaurant and he’d sold the one business that was doing really well. Worse still, the R240 000 he’d made from Ocean Basket and invested with a broker became R80 000 overnight after the 9/11 attacks in the US. Panicking, Altriche pulled his money out.

But, entrepreneurs are resilient, particularly if they accept the powerful role failure plays in eventual success. Altriche took stock of where he was, and visualised what he wanted his life to look like.

“I wanted a break. Through the natural way I visualise things, I realised I wanted to go back to running a restaurant, earning a decent wage, and being in control of my own business.”

brian-altriche

Altriche had identified Spur as the franchise he wanted to own. But joining one of the oldest franchises in South Africa was easier said than done. The franchisor was fiercely loyal to existing franchisees who got first dibs on any new locations or stores.

“First, I got a loan from FNB. Then I did my own negotiations with the landlord at Southgate and got a good installation deal. I tap danced to open that store. It took me 25 phone calls just to get a meeting with Spur. I cut my hair, donned a collared shirt, and got a testimonial from Fats. Before they would even consider my application, Spur asked all the franchisees in the area if they wanted Southgate? No one did.

“I wasn’t focused on ROI. I worked that business, growing it step by step. I paid off my loan and earned a decent salary. Today it’s a massive business and I still own it. One year later I opened a second Spur with a 50% partner. We opened in the Carlton Centre in December 2006. It was a big risk. No one knew what was going to happen in that area. We stuck it out and today it’s also a great business. Trust in Joburg’s CBD is growing. The equity partners that I’ve developed are gems.

“I’ve bought two more Spurs over the years. I sold one, and closed the other. We bought into the idea of the regeneration of town leading up to the World Cup. Maboneng and Braamfontein have been a success. Hillbrow hasn’t. The recession hit and everything ground to a halt. It’s now full of empty and highjacked buildings.”

By 2007 Altriche had regrouped and was ready for a new challenge. “Sushi bars were everywhere when I lived in California,” he says. “When I returned to South Africa in the early 90s our market wasn’t ready for them, but almost 20 years later I thought it was.”

Altriche let Spur know what he was doing, and the franchisor gave him its blessing. He opened a Yume in Clearwater Mall and Monte Casino before selling the brand.

He’d learnt another valuable lesson, this time not from a failure, but interestingly from the success of his brand. “I had a lot of fun with the branding and the overall look and feel of the Yume experience, but throughout building and launching the brand I realised I never, ever wanted to eat sushi again. I still don’t.”

Related: How Soccer Laduma Scores In More Than One Way

The lesson? Don’t launch something if it’s not going to hold your own attention. “Through my own reaction to sushi I began to doubt how long the market for sushi bars would last. I didn’t think I could build it into a large, vibrant brand with stores across the country. It was too niche and trendy.”

But this was the seed for RocoMamas. What wouldn’t get old and tired quickly? What dining and food experience would hold South Africa’s attention, across demographics, standing the test of time? “While that idea was percolating, I was grappling with the fact that my two teenage daughters considered fast food normal. I hadn’t grow up with that. In the US you get some fast food that’s still made like it was made in the 50s. It’s real food.”

The idea for RocoMamas was taking shape, becoming more real day by day, as Altriche started visualising what this dining experience would be like

brian-altriche-rocomamas

“Initially I was going more gourmet, but I’ve learnt to walk through my ideas; feel them out from every angle. I wanted to see how the concept should fit together and work. What is the full brand experience? What does it look, feel, smell and taste like?

“You need to be able to under-promise and over-deliver and so I asked myself what that looked like? I wanted the concept to be franchisable. Colour, branding and food — everything needed to be replicable, but still based on fresh cooking. That was important.”

By being completely obsessive, Altriche has achieved his goal. 90% of RocoMamas’ menu is freshly prepared and cooked. The only items each store needs to buy are frozen fries and baked rolls. “The meat we buy is fresh. We spent a lot of time getting that right. All of our meat is from the same butcher who is audited by Spur. He’s a passionate youngster, born and bred in butcheries. We march to the same beat.”

The idea behind the smashburger, which Altriche has trademarked in South Africa, also came from the US. “There was a burger place I loved. It was run by a husband and wife team, and he smashed the burgers. He used meatballs with no binding agents, and he’d place them on a hot skillet and smash them down. You lose no juices with that method. Everything squeezed out of the meatball is immediately sealed into the patty. The entire idea was based on memory and obsessively walking through the vision.”

A well-run business is much more complicated than the customer perceives. “That’s the point though,” says Altriche. “It should be simple for the consumer. There are so many parts to make this work seamlessly. We’re targeting a market that is generally loyal to the big brands. The right marketing gets them through the door, but the atmosphere keeps them here. We’ve created a comfortable environment for anyone, with delicious, fresh food that will always be a firm favourite. Burgers are sexy again, but they’ve always been a food that everyone loves.”

Related: Beauty And The Business: How The Diva Slimming And Aesthetics Centre Is Full Of Opportunities

As with Yume, Altriche presented the idea to Spur, and they gave him their blessing. “I opened two stores, and my brother-in-law became my first franchisee, bringing us up to three. Then Pierre van Tonder, CEO of Spur Group, told me Spur wanted to be involved. I’d designed the concept with franchising in mind, and I’d already had a lot of franchisee enquiries, so the partnership was an obvious next step. I had created the branding, marketing and look and feel of the brand, but Spur has the franchising know-how. The Spur Group is a master of systems, processes and training manuals, and these are a vital cog in a franchise’s success. We have taken this brand to incredible heights.”

RocoMamas has become an overnight household name, but longevity is going to come through slow, careful, sustainable growth, which is exactly what Altriche is doing.

Nadine Todd is the Managing Editor of Entrepreneur Magazine, the How-To guide for growing businesses. Find her on Google+.

Advertisement
Comments

Lessons Learnt

Founder of Five-Star Wes Boshoff Weighs In On Becoming An Entrepreneur

Here are Wes Boshoff’s seven lessons in building a brand that matters, offering your clients something of worth, and always following your passions.

Nadine Todd

Published

on

wes-boshoff

A lot of starting a business is just winging it. Call it the hustle, faking it ‘till you make it or biting off more than you can chew (and then chewing like hell), the reality is the same: Doing what you can, when you can to get yourself and your business out there so that you can build a brand with longevity.

As a start-up, does your vision push the boundaries? Are you putting everything you have into achieving something great? Here are seven lessons to help you (and your business) reach full potential.

1. Seize the day

Wes began his career in the people development industry. He was involved in high-impact training and developmental coaching, and entrepreneurship couldn’t have been further from his mind. “I had no appetite for going solo,” he recalls.

Related: Failure Is Not An Option – Or Is It? Your How To On How To

“I was employed but doing some part-time coaching on the side, and while this may have seemed like a springboard into entrepreneurship, I’ve always viewed start-ups as requiring three key things: Timing, opportunity and experience. Experience in particular was a stumbling block for me. I was young. I didn’t feel like I’d earned real credibility or had enough life experience to offer real value to others. Who would listen to me? I was just Wes.”

And then an opportunity presented itself and Wes decided to take the plunge anyway. “After becoming an expert in behaviour and personality profiling, I was asked to join a project management company. About a year into joining them they shut down.”

Facing unemployment, Wes decided to take the plunge and never work for a boss again. Instead, he seized the opportunity to launch his own business and brand.

And so, Five-Star was born, a brand that sought to help businesses improve their customer service by first focusing on their employees. Wes decided to cut his teeth in the hospitality arena, where customer service is the life-blood of the industry.

The lesson: There is no perfect time to start a business. There will always be excuses to put it off. You will never be 100% ready. And yet, until you’ve taken that first step, you can’t start testing your model in the market, tweaking and adjusting your offering to suit your audience. If your dream is to become an entrepreneur, don’t look for all the reasons why you shouldn’t take the plunge, but focus on the one reason why you should.

2. Don’t wait for business to find you

When Wes launched Five-Star, he had no savings to invest in the business and no assets. He had himself and his experiences. “I didn’t spend time on a business plan or money on getting a website up and running — that would all come later. I spent what I could afford on business cards, and hit the streets. I believed I could tell my story better than a website could, and so I focused on getting myself in front of the people I needed to sell my services to.”

Wes’ first call was to the GM of one of the fastest growing hotel groups in the country. “I introduced myself as Wes from Five-Star, told him I’d heard a lot about how good his hotel was, and that I’d love to take him out for coffee to discuss what would take them to a ten. I didn’t sell anything over the phone — I wanted a face-to-face meeting, and the opportunity to share real value. I wanted him to see why we should work together, rather than make a hard sell.”

Wes is an expert in hospitality, training and customer service. But he was also winging it. During the coffee meeting he was asked to do a mystery guest assessment, to uncover which areas could be improved upon. “I asked him if he’d like me to use their report or mine, and thank goodness he said theirs, since I didn’t have one.” Nine years later, that hotel group is Wes’ longest-standing client.

This is the tactic Wes has used to build his business and brand ever since: He focuses on face-to-face meetings, sharing his story, who he is and what he’s learnt, and really listening to his clients’ challenges so that he can offer advice and add value — even if they don’t end up doing business together.

The lesson: Entrepreneurs make things happen for themselves. Wes personally does not like cold calls, and so he’s found a sales strategy that works for him. How you sell isn’t as important as the fact that you are out there, selling yourself, your business and the solutions you can offer. If you aren’t out there selling, you’ll never build a sustainable start-up.

3. Make the most of tools

wes-boshoff-five-star

The report that the hotel gave Wes for his first mystery guest assessment became the template for a report he built for himself. Over the years he has developed numerous tools, building on his experience with Discus and other methodologies to create frameworks for his motivational talks, training and coaching programmes.

“In the early days I couldn’t afford to purchase tools, so I had to really listen to my clients and develop what they needed. There are so many resources available to us today. You just need to do your research, know your industry and be constantly tweaking your offering based on what works best.”

In Wes’ own words, he’s not a book smarts guy, but a street smarts guy. “It’s why a business plan didn’t work for me — I needed to be out there, testing my model and my theories, and tweaking and adjusting my offering. I paid my school fees, and used those learnings to develop the tools I needed to deliver results.

Related: The Journey Of Entrepreneurship: How The Tough Get Going

“I love developing models. Applied knowledge is power. But don’t overcomplicate things. There’s a simple process to learning and development: The stages of knowledge start with a revelation, new knowledge, followed by realisation — making it real — and finally a revolution, which leads to purpose and progress. That’s what I help people to do — create perspectives, interrogate the perspective, and then affect real change in their lives and businesses.”

The lesson: The more open you are to learning and adjusting your solutions, the more you’ll be able to offer to your clients. Any tools you can develop to add to the overall experience are value-adds that benefit yourself and your clients.

4. Add value before you add an invoice

Wes is a born networker. He loves meeting new people, sharing his story, and finding out more about the people he’s networking with. He’s also very good at uncovering the challenges they face and offering solutions, even if those solutions aren’t one of the products he offers.

“When you increase your network, you increase your net worth. I believe in being the go-to guy for my clients. I want them to feel comfortable picking up the phone and asking my advice on anything. I believe great businesses and brands are built when you add value before you add an invoice.”

This has been Wes’ motto throughout his career, long before he launched his own business. “I’ve always put my hand up when a new challenge or task has presented itself. I don’t believe in constantly looking for what’s wrong in what’s right. Face the reality, and determine the best way to get the opportunity out of the obstacle. You need to choose to be opportunistic. I’m a realist, but that doesn’t mean I want to live in a negative environment.

“I’ve brought this attitude to everything I do, including how I view my clients’ businesses. It’s not about what I can get from them, but what I can add to them. Some of this I can charge for, but valuable advice should be freely given. I believe in cultivating an opportunistic mindset; and I want to help my clients and their employees to do the same.”

The lesson: As an entrepreneur, you need to walk the talk. If you truly care about your customers, add real value without always expecting something in return. You’ll build long-term relationships built on trust and mutual respect.

5. Don’t lose Focus

It’s a common problem amongst start-up entrepreneurs. Early wins leave you feeling overly confident and eager for more. It’s at this stage that many business owners start looking for new challenges, and where else they can divest their energy for new and exciting wins.

For Wes, this diversion was cars. “I’d been accepted into the Branson Centre for Entrepreneurship, but instead of focusing on Five-Star, I was looking for a way to combine my passion for cars with business.”

Related: 8 Entrepreneurs Share Their Best Advice For When The Going Gets Tough

What Wes found was Plastic Dip, a US-based product used to wrap cars. “I stopped focusing on Five-Star and launched Plastispray,” he recalls. “I had this massive vision, with not much support. I forgot the cardinal rule that I’d learnt in Samuel Chand’s book, Who’s Holding Your Ladder, and that’s the importance of support. We might be the sole founders of our businesses, but that doesn’t mean we don’t need support systems. Who is holding your ladder? Who won’t get bored and walk away?

“I ended up in a situation where my focus was completely scattered, I wasn’t managing my personal life, and the business I was trying to build just didn’t have legs. I even landed this incredible project, building a Mini Cooper for the launch of Virgin Mobile. We turned it into a photo-booth and broke a world record for the most people squeezed into a Mini — which was 25.

“I thought, that’s it, after this project, the business will just take off. And nothing happened. It opened no doors.”

It was a hard lesson to learn, and one that took its toll on Wes emotionally. “2013 was the lowest year of my life,” he says. “I started seeing a psychologist, and spent 2014 rebuilding myself. I realised I needed to work on my attitude, my fears and my business. I also needed to learn how to focus again. We can’t achieve anything in life if we aren’t focused.

“I failed hard, but it also gave me perspective. When you learn you win — which means that failure isn’t actually losing. It’s important to understand that, and it’s what pushed me through the tough times. Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn.”

Once Wes regrouped and renewed his focus on Five-Star, the business started taking off. “People outside of the hospitality industry started asking me for help. I was invited to speak at international leadership conferences, and work with businesses on turnaround strategies. From there the business has just grown from strength to strength.”

The lesson: Focus is essential. It’s easy to get distracted and chase the next trend or hot idea, but real success takes time to build, and sticking to anything long-term takes focus. The more focused you are, the higher your chances of success.

6. Understand your brand

For nine years Wes has operated the business under the Five-Star name. The longer he’s been in the industry however, the clearer it’s become that his brand isn’t the business, it’s himself, and his ideas.

“I’m always, unapologetically, ‘just Wes’,” he says. “You’ll never be everything to everyone. The best thing you can be is authentic. Some people will love you, others won’t. That’s okay. Just be true to yourself. I’m not a suits guy. I arrive how I am, share my story, my lessons, and give the best advice I can. I share tools and tips to become the best version of you. I wouldn’t be able to do that if I wasn’t completely myself when I work with my clients.”

It’s for this reason that Wes has recently rebranded the business to ‘Wes’, with the tagline, Imagine Thinking. It’s an ideal closely linked with his talks, his philosophy, and his name in the market. “I’m becoming a thought leader, and that comes with risks,” he says. “When you put yourself out there, you need to have enough confidence for people to disagree with you, because that’s hard. Not everyone will like what you’re saying or agree with you on a particular issue. You put yourself out there in the public domain and if you aren’t sure of who you are and what you stand for, insecurities can come to haunt you.

“I tell everyone I speak to, ‘disagree with everything I say…’ I can’t change the way people think, or what they think — I just want to challenge them to think for a change. I want you to consider your opinions and question them. Imagine thinking. Thinking is a verb. You have to do something — you need to disagree to set your own thoughts in motion. Be brave; share your thoughts so that we all benefit together.

“I used to take myself seriously; I don’t anymore. I don’t want to offend, but I’m okay if you don’t agree with me.”

The lesson: Your personal and business brands tell a story. They let your customers know who you are, what you stand for, and what your values are. People do business with people, not companies, so don’t be afraid to authentically share your story.

Related: How To Start A Business With (Almost) No Money

7. Have a vision that scares you

For Wes, too many organisations have a vision that’s external and designed for clients. But he believes vision is an internal thing. “As an entrepreneur, your vision should be for you and your employees. It should be your guiding light. It’s your future, and it should consistently grow.

“If you don’t achieve your vision, it’s because you don’t have an appetite for the mission. If you’re only looking two to five years into the future, that’s a goal, not a vision. Your vision should scare you. It should wake you up and keep you up. It should drive you.”

“The mission is how you achieve the vision. You need to know what it will take to get there, and this usually includes a lot of hard work, stress, fear, and living on the edge. But that’s okay, because we’re designed to stretch ourselves. That’s when we discover our full potential.”

The lesson: Don’t ever be too scared to think big. Thinking small isn’t what entrepreneurs are built for. Big hairy audacious goals (or BHAGs) are the foundation of successful, game changing businesses — and successful, fulfilled entrepreneurs.

Continue Reading

Lessons Learnt

Successful People Always Chase the Impossible – Here’s Why

Achieving perfection may never happen, but the attempt can lead to results you never imagined.

Published

on

running-towards-goal

Vince Lombardi said it best: “We will chase perfection, knowing all the while we can never attain it. But along the way, we shall catch excellence.”


Successful people are always in the chase for perfection. As Lombardi knew, however, and as I’ve discovered more than once myself, what we chase is often very different from what we catch.

Early in my career, I planned on being a pharmacist, then making partner at a PR firm. Both goals were within reach, but I never caught them — as they came close I found myself rethinking my ambitions, then changing direction. I had to let go of the goals that had motivated me for years, and find different ones, chasing perfection in new and often unexpected ways.

If you are looking to catch the best in excellence, while not letting yourself get boxed in by chasing perfection, it is important to remember a few key guidelines.

Changing your path isn’t failing

Successful people – and entrepreneurs especially – are driven by their goals. It’s a fine line, though, between goals that inspire and goals that trap. The best stories about entrepreneurs are full of fresh starts and unexpected detours. If you find yourself disliking what you’re doing, or feeling frustrated even when things are going well, think about making a new plan.

Changing your path isn’t bad or wrong or failing – it’s simply a new choice, and often the right one.

Related: 7 Rules To Master Your Start-Up Success This Year

Never perceive anything as a setback

Circumstances can spiral out of control – plans tank, products fail, companies come apart. When something is running off the road you can be consumed by it, or you can realise that what you took to heart before isn’t your reality anymore, and the seeming chaos around you disguises a new reality. Don’t beat yourself up about it, don’t mourn the wasted time and the discarded mission. Negative experiences aren’t a setback, they’re a chance to make new decisions that are right for you.

However bad the situation, there’s always an angle

bad-situationWhen things get rough, take five minutes and give free rein to let it all out. Find a private place, get mad or cry, let whatever’s struggling inside you get out. Then get to work finding the angle. There’s always an angle, and a path forward to success. Usually, it involves getting over yourself. Whatever your emotions, stop thinking it’s about you.

Recognise that you’re in service to something larger than yourself – your company, your staff, the people who depend on you. That’s where you’ll find the angle you need, beyond your emotions, and outside of yourself.

Related: Elon Musk’s Formula For Successfully Growing Companies Faster

Success looks different to different people

We can all relate to the true believer who challenges conventional wisdom and beats the odds. When we make these challenges, our parents, bosses, society at large – insert appropriate authority figure – sometimes just won’t see it our way. But often it’s our own internal schoolmaster that’s the barrier we need to overcome. We persist in judging ourselves by standards that once seemed essential, but have outlived their usefulness. In fact, there are many different ways to succeed. The important thing is being comfortable with knowing there is more than one right answer.

It’s a never-ending experience

Is it ever time to stop chasing perfection? No. Chasing perfection is the opposite of a hamster wheel or rat race. It’s about your never-ending pursuit of happiness. The sooner in life that we master the flexible mindset needed for continuous evolution, the better.

My career has had enough twists and turns all ready to make a running back proud. At those times when I had no control over my external situation, I could see that the one path I thought I would take wasn’t the only path – or even the right path.

Related: To Be Successful Stay Far Away From These 7 Types of Toxic People

I’ve never come close to attaining perfection, but Mr. Lombardi was right. By chasing it, from my days studying to be a pharmacist to my current role as VP of Marketing and Communications at Intel, I’ve caught excellence again and again along the way.

This article was originally posted here on Entrepreneur.com.

Continue Reading

Company Posts

Why Grit Is The True Determining Factor Of Success

How grit and determination helped Bertus Albertse take control of his destiny and build an award-winning franchise brand.

Body20 franchise

Published

on

body20-bertus-albertse

Vital Stats

  • Player:Bertus Albertse
  • Company: Body20
  • Established:2014
  • Contact:+27 (0)872310359
  • Visit: body20.co.za

What does it take to open a successful business, franchise it, and then take it global? In many instances, the answer is grit, determination and the ability to get back up when life knocks you down.

In fact, Angela Lee Duckworth, an academic and psychologist based at the University of Pennsylvania, where she studies concepts such as self-control and grit to determine how they might predict academic and professional success, believes that the single biggest predictor of success isn’t social intelligence, good looks, physical health or even IQ.

The single biggest predictor of success is grit.

According to Duckworth, grit is passion and perseverance for very long-term goals. It’s having stamina. Grit is sticking with your future, day in, day out, not just for the week or the month, but for

Years. It’s about working hard to make that future a reality. Grit is living life like it’s a marathon, not a sprint.

Related: The Wolf Within Bertus Albertse: Body20’s CEO

Finding self-worth

To find the epitome of grit, we need look no further than Bertus Albertse, the founder and CEO of Body20 Global, a local franchise that is now making international waves.

As a youngster, Bertus was used to living in the unpredictable. His parents divorced when he was just nine months old and his mother, walking with both him and his sister on her hips, moved from house to house whenever his alcoholic grandfather took to the rod.

He realised early in his life that material things come and go as his mother had to return worn clothes and used toys not long after they have been purchased.

In fact, it happened so often that at some point even Bertus and his sister had to return items at retail stores at a young age in order to have money for food or petrol.

“To this day I’ve never forgotten where I come from and how retailers looked at me and my sister with pity and shame in their eyes,” he recalls.

Going the distance

Instead of letting the experience bow him down, Bertus learnt to be comfortable with the uncomfortable, taking control and responsibility over his own life. As an excelling young sportsman, he soon realised how he could control his own destiny by consistently putting in huge effort.

One of his favourite quotes is “You are what you repeatedly do, therefore excellence is not an act but rather a habit.”

It’s a mantra he lives by. Through pure grit and determination, he went from a small, skinny kid from the ‘platteland’ in the West Coast to be the first Head Boy of both the school and boy’s residents at the prestigious high school, Jan van Riebeeck, situated in the heart of Cape Town.

Related: From Body20 Member To Franchisee Of The Year 2017

Stay hungry and make a real impact

Bertus also has numerous sports achievements, including national and international Body Building and Fitness titles. With his passionate and optimistic outlook on life, he soon realised that people are drawn to the ideas and things that inspire him and this has given him a flair for business, enabling him to share that passion with his community.

He started his first business in his second year of University in Stellenbosch with a R20 000 loan from his father, which he subsequently paid back three months later.

Today, Bertus is the founder and CEO of the award-winning global fitness franchise network, Body20. He strives to impact those around him by inspiring them to take control of their lives and encourages people to believe in the impossible, but to always remember to take consistent, daily actions to make it possible.

“A rabbit will always outrun the fox, because while the fox runs for its lunch the rabbit runs for its life.” He likes to be reminded of how hungry you have to be to truly make an impact in the world.

Continue Reading

Trending