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Foot Print SA: Jules Newton

An innovative financial model allows a company to deliver large scale training at greatly reduced costs while tapping into alternative income streams.

Juliet Pitman

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Jules Newton of FootPrint SA

During tough economic times, the pressure is on businesses to come up with creative financial models that will ensure they remain within reach of clients who are feeling the pinch. Nowhere is this more relevant than in sectors, like training, which are the first to feel the effect of corporate cost cutting measures.

Fortunately, Jules Newton knows a thing or two about how economies of scale can bring down the per head cost of training. It’s something she learned as one of the founders of Ngikwazi Field Marketing, which recruits, trains and supports the 8 600-strong nationwide retail network for national lottery operator, Gidani. “On a contract of that size you learn how much price per head can come down if your numbers are big enough,” she says.

It’s a lesson she’s now applying to the field of training with Footprint, a company that delivers basic life skills training to people at the bottom of the pyramid. What’s innovative about Footprint is not only that it delivers training on a scale beyond what’s been done before by most training companies, but that it does so at prices which significantly undercut traditional training models. Furthermore, the type of training it offers allows prospective clients to tap into their corporate social investment (CSI) and enterprise development (ED) budgets – an alternative and often untapped revenue stream.

A new training model

Newton explains how it all works: “Footprint focuses on large corporates and government institutions that need to deliver life skills, non-brand specific training that has a benefit to the lives of people in the mass market. This might be things like basic financial literacy, wellness programmes, how to save electricity or HIV/Aids awareness.

“We produce picture-based training material that’s langauge-agnostic and easily accessible, so the trainers themselves don’t need to be highly skilled. We source them from the target communities and up-skill them to deliver the training.” Because the trainers come from within the communities themselves, the company saves significantly on travel costs. The model allows training to be delivered at R100 a head, which includes a cooked lunch for delegates. Compared to blue-chip corporate training of between R1 250 and R2 500 per person per day, or even community training of between R350 and R900, the savings are considerable.

Igniting small enterprises

The trainers run their operations as micro-enterprises, with Footprint providing support in the form of basic business training and mentors. “They get paid to organise a suitable venue and catering, and are also paid a per head incentive for any learners they manage to source.

“They speak the language of the community and have an established relationship with the people there,” says Newton. The model offers an ideal way for corporates to invest their enterprise development funding and earn broad-based black economic empowerment points, or to channel CSI funding to community education projects on issues such as HIV/Aids. Own Two Feet is an NGO that’s been established specifically to manage and channel such ED funding. “Financial institutions need to invest in financial literacy programmes for the community in compliance with the requirements of the Financial Services Charter, and this is something Footprint can do at a fraction of the cost and with far greater reach than if they were doing it themselves,” Newton explains.

Securing success

Hollard, Edcon, Pep, the Financial Education Fund and the Financial Services Board are just some of organisations that have seen the benefits Footprint can deliver. The scale of what the company can achieve is considerable. In its first year, it started 25 predominantly women-owned micro-enterprises, through which it trained over 17 000 South Africans in basic financial literacy skills.

And that’s just the beginning. “We now have an ambitious plan to expand our South African operations to include over 100 micro-enterprises training hundreds of thousands of South Africans annually, in various programmes that empower people. And soon, we intend to expand our model and operations into Africa and beyond,” says Newton. The model only works at scale so the challenge now will be to secure contracts that are large enough to make the company’s vision possible. But Newton has a solid value proposition: “This is the way to educate people at the bottom of the pyramid, and we all know how desperately South Africa and Africa need that. Our company provides a way for corporates and governments to meet this need.”

Footprint
Player: Jules Newton
Est. 2008
Contact: +27 11 614 0206
www.footprintsa.co.za

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27 Of The Richest People In South Africa

Here are 27 of South Africa’s richest people, but how did they achieve this level of wealth? Find out here.

Nicole Crampton

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Learn the secrets of SA’s most successful business people, here is the list of the 27 richest people in South Africa:

In a world with growing entrepreneurship success stories, victory is often measured in terms of money. The feat of achieving a place on this list is, however, years of hard work, determination and persistence. “One has to set high standards… I can never be happy with mediocre performance,” advises Patrice Motsepe.

From the individuals that made the 27 of the richest people in South Africa list, actual entrepreneurs and self-made business people dominate the list; while those who inherited their fortunes have gone on to do even bigger and better things with their wealth. Over the years, some have slipped off the list, while others continue to climb higher and higher each year.

  1. Elisabeth Bradley
  2. Sharon Wapnick
  3. Bridgette Radebe
  4. Irene Charnley
  5. Wendy Ackerman
  6. Paul Harris
  7. Wendy Appelbaum
  8. Mark Shuttleworth
  9. Desmond Sacco
  10. Giovanni Ravazzotti
  11. Markus Jooste
  12. Gus Attridge
  13. Gerrit Thomas Ferreira
  14. Cyril Ramaphosa
  15. Adrian Gore
  16. Raymond Ackerman
  17. Michiel Le Roux
  18. Lauritz Dippenaar
  19. Jannie Mouton
  20. Stephen Saad
  21. Patrice Motsepe
  22. Allan Gray
  23. Koos Bekker
  24. Ivan Glasenberg
  25. Christoffel Wiese
  26. Johann Rupert
  27. Nicky Oppenheimer
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Watch List: 50 Top SA Black Entrepreneurs To Watch

South Africa needs more entrepreneurs to build businesses that can make a positive impact on the economy. These up-and-coming black entrepreneurs are showing how it can be done.

Nicole Crampton

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Early-stage South African entrepreneurial activity is at an all-time high of 11%, according to Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, and entrepreneurial intentions have also increased to 11.7%. With both activity and intentions growing significantly year-on-year, there are more businesses opening up around South Africa than ever before.

The increase in entrepreneurship has seen the rise of more black entrepreneurs across numerous sectors. From beauty brands to legal services and even tech start-ups, these are 50 top black entrepreneurs to watch:

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Watch List: 50 Top SA Small Businesses To Watch

Keep your finger on the pulse of the start-up space by using our comprehensive list of SA small business to watch.

Nicole Crampton

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Entrepreneurship in South Africa is at an all-time high. According to Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM), total early-stage entrepreneurial activity has increased by 4.1% to 11% in 2017/2018. This means numerous new, exciting and promising small businesses are launching and growing.

To ensure you know who the innovative trailblazers are in the start-up and small business space, here are 50 of South Africa’s top establishing companies to watch, in no particular order:

  1. Livestock Wealth
  2. The Lazy Makoti
  3. Aerobuddies
  4. Mimi Women
  5. i-Pay
  6. AfriTorch Digital
  7. Akili Labs
  8. Native Décor
  9. Aerobotics
  10. Quality Solutions
  11. EM Guidance
  12. Kahvé Road
  13. HSE Matters
  14. VA Virtual Assistant
  15. Famram Solutions and Famram Foundation
  16. BioTech Africa
  17. Brand LAIKI
  18. Plus Fab
  19. LifeQ
  20. Organico
  21. 10dot
  22. Lenoma Legal
  23. Nkukhu-Box
  24. Benji + Moon
  25. Beonics
  26. Brett Naicker Wines
  27. Khalala
  28. Legal Legends
  29. The Power Woman Project
  30. Aviro Health
  31. AnaStellar Brands
  32. Data Innovator
  33. Fo-Sho
  34. Oolala Collection Club
  35. Recomed
  36. VoiceMap
  37. ClockWork
  38. Empty Trips
  39. Vula Mobile
  40. SwiitchBeauty
  41. Pineapple
  42. The Katy Valentine Collection
  43. OfferZen
  44. KHULA
  45. Incitech
  46. Pimp my Book
  47. ART Technologies and ART Call Management
  48. Prosperiprop
  49. WAXIT
  50. The Sun Exchange
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