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Kit Kat Group: Ahmed Gani

A Family-Owned Business Makes Its Influence Felt With Business Suss And Strict Systems

Juliet Pitman

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Ahmed Gani of Kit Kat Group

From his glass-fronted office at the exit of the Pretoria-based Kit Kat Cash & Carry store, Ahmed Gani, MD of Kit Kat Group, waves to customers and suppliers as they leave. “I want to see that nobody looks unhappy as they walk out. I want them to see me so that at least our eyes can meet and we can greet each other,” he explains. It’s a hands-on approach that has come to epitomise what this up-and-coming business is about.

Started as a corner café by Gani’s grandfather and great uncle in 1953, Kit Kat Group has grown to incorporate the Cash & Carry outlet, three retail outlets and, this year, the first of many franchise outlets. Gani describes the opening of the 20 000 m2-plus Cash & Carry outlet as a “humungous” step for the family. “Being a privately owned business, money comes in limited amounts, but we’ve always run a very tight ship with low overheads, good stock turns and quick turnovers.

“And that enabled us to build up a reasonable amount of capital in our family so that the business has always carried itself,” he says of how the growth has been funded. In spite of its growth and success, Kit Kat has managed to retain all the benefits of being family-owned. “The pros far outweigh the cons of being a family business,” says Gani, explaining that independence and the lack of corporate ‘red tape’ gives the company the flexibility to react quickly to market demands in order to stay a step ahead of its competitors.

However, the pitfalls of family-owned businesses are well-documented. All too often, they are too democratically run and lack a ‘buck-stops-here’ boss. As they grow, family members, long-used to signing off on everything, battle to relinquish control of operations, stifling future success potential. Or a wayward son or grandson with a big ego and a small business brain ruins what it took his fore fathers years to build.

The Gani family has managed to avoid such pitfalls by implementing strict systems that ensure that the way the business is run won’t fluctuate too drastically depending on who sits in the boss’s chair. “The boss is the system,” says Gani, explaining that the family has devised a proven set of systems over time to which family members, management and staff alike are expected to adhere.

On the question of delegating tasks and decisions to empowered managers, he says simply, “If you can’t share, you can’t grow.” All family members, from Gani as MD to his brother and cousin who occupy positions as financial and merchandise directors, have done their time on the shop floor.

“The advice I would give to any family-run business is that you can’t take a family member and put them at the helm of the business if they don’t understand what it is about and haven’t been through every category of the business.” Apart from internal operational challenges, Kit Kat is up against it when it comes to the size and sheer clout of their competitors. But, as Gani explains, their hands-on approach has stood them in good stead here as well: “Customers see the value of dealing with hands-on type operators. If you are not satisfied you can meet the MD of the company in a minute and we can immediately try to rectify things so that you leave here as a happy client,” he explains.

The same applies to suppliers, and Gani lists integrity and supplier relationships as key factors in the company’s success: “A lot of suppliers feel cornered by the large chain groups so they look for outlets of our type to leverage themselves and get into the market without being dictated to too much.

We build up good relationships with suppliers over time.” That’s not to say that healthy negotiations with suppliers don’t form a solid base to the business and, as Gani points out: “In order to sell competitively you’ve got to buy competitively so when we sit across a table and do a deal, we fight to get the best possible price, structures and payment terms but once we shake on it, we honour it.

If I tell a supplier he will be paid on the 15th of the month, on the 14th he’s got his money.” It’s obvious that in spite of being small by comparison, Kit Kat is making an impact in the market. In the past year, two different chain groups have attempted to buy the business out, but Gani is having none of it.

With big plans for the future, he wants to keep the business independent. The opening of at least four new Cash & Carry outlets in Gauteng, and 25 franchises over the next two to three years, are just some of the plans in the pipeline. His answer to buy-out offers were, “No thank you. We are not for sale. But look out for us within the next five years – I might be coming to buy you out.” They may prove to be prophetic words. Contact: 0861 548 528, www.kitkatgroup.com

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27 Of The Richest People In South Africa

Here are 27 of South Africa’s richest people, but how did they achieve this level of wealth? Find out here.

Nicole Crampton

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Learn the secrets of SA’s most successful business people, here is the list of the 27 richest people in South Africa:

In a world with growing entrepreneurship success stories, victory is often measured in terms of money. The feat of achieving a place on this list is, however, years of hard work, determination and persistence. “One has to set high standards… I can never be happy with mediocre performance,” advises Patrice Motsepe.

From the individuals that made the 27 of the richest people in South Africa list, actual entrepreneurs and self-made business people dominate the list; while those who inherited their fortunes have gone on to do even bigger and better things with their wealth. Over the years, some have slipped off the list, while others continue to climb higher and higher each year.

  1. Elisabeth Bradley
  2. Sharon Wapnick
  3. Bridgette Radebe
  4. Irene Charnley
  5. Wendy Ackerman
  6. Paul Harris
  7. Wendy Appelbaum
  8. Mark Shuttleworth
  9. Desmond Sacco
  10. Giovanni Ravazzotti
  11. Markus Jooste
  12. Gus Attridge
  13. Gerrit Thomas Ferreira
  14. Cyril Ramaphosa
  15. Adrian Gore
  16. Raymond Ackerman
  17. Michiel Le Roux
  18. Lauritz Dippenaar
  19. Jannie Mouton
  20. Stephen Saad
  21. Patrice Motsepe
  22. Allan Gray
  23. Koos Bekker
  24. Ivan Glasenberg
  25. Christoffel Wiese
  26. Johann Rupert
  27. Nicky Oppenheimer
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Watch List: 50 Top SA Black Entrepreneurs To Watch

South Africa needs more entrepreneurs to build businesses that can make a positive impact on the economy. These up-and-coming black entrepreneurs are showing how it can be done.

Nicole Crampton

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Early-stage South African entrepreneurial activity is at an all-time high of 11%, according to Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, and entrepreneurial intentions have also increased to 11.7%. With both activity and intentions growing significantly year-on-year, there are more businesses opening up around South Africa than ever before.

The increase in entrepreneurship has seen the rise of more black entrepreneurs across numerous sectors. From beauty brands to legal services and even tech start-ups, these are 50 top black entrepreneurs to watch:

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Watch List: 50 Top SA Small Businesses To Watch

Keep your finger on the pulse of the start-up space by using our comprehensive list of SA small business to watch.

Nicole Crampton

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Entrepreneurship in South Africa is at an all-time high. According to Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM), total early-stage entrepreneurial activity has increased by 4.1% to 11% in 2017/2018. This means numerous new, exciting and promising small businesses are launching and growing.

To ensure you know who the innovative trailblazers are in the start-up and small business space, here are 50 of South Africa’s top establishing companies to watch, in no particular order:

  1. Livestock Wealth
  2. The Lazy Makoti
  3. Aerobuddies
  4. Mimi Women
  5. i-Pay
  6. AfriTorch Digital
  7. Akili Labs
  8. Native Décor
  9. Aerobotics
  10. Quality Solutions
  11. EM Guidance
  12. Kahvé Road
  13. HSE Matters
  14. VA Virtual Assistant
  15. Famram Solutions and Famram Foundation
  16. BioTech Africa
  17. Brand LAIKI
  18. Plus Fab
  19. LifeQ
  20. Organico
  21. 10dot
  22. Lenoma Legal
  23. Nkukhu-Box
  24. Benji + Moon
  25. Beonics
  26. Brett Naicker Wines
  27. Khalala
  28. Legal Legends
  29. The Power Woman Project
  30. Aviro Health
  31. AnaStellar Brands
  32. Data Innovator
  33. Fo-Sho
  34. Oolala Collection Club
  35. Recomed
  36. VoiceMap
  37. ClockWork
  38. Empty Trips
  39. Vula Mobile
  40. SwiitchBeauty
  41. Pineapple
  42. The Katy Valentine Collection
  43. OfferZen
  44. KHULA
  45. Incitech
  46. Pimp my Book
  47. ART Technologies and ART Call Management
  48. Prosperiprop
  49. WAXIT
  50. The Sun Exchange
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