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Women Entrepreneur Successes

Kim Coppen-Watkins On Having And Maintaining Strategic Growth

The best opportunities don’t just land in your lap – you have to go out and make them happen. But while you’re building your business, don’t lose sight of your original vision.

Nadine Todd

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Vital Stats

  • Player: Kim Coppen-Watkins
  • Company: Think Entertainment
  • Clients: Idols SA, Graeme Watkins Project
  • Launched: 2014
  • Visit: www.thinkentertainment.co.za

Do this

As you grow, take the time to step back and really look at your business. Are you doing what you set out to do? Have you pivoted where necessary, but maintained your goal and vision?

Kim Coppen-Watkins planned to be a performer, but sometimes the best opportunities come along when you aren’t planning for them. You can let them go by, or you can seize them and make them work for you anyway.

“After I graduated I took a job at a Cape-based agency. I wanted to continue working within my industry while I went to castings,” Kim explains.

Related: Women Who Lead: Bonnie Cooper And Esna Colyn On Wearing The Mantle Of Leadership

But while she was still focusing on being in front of the camera or on stage, two things were happening. First, she was booking and managing gigs for her boyfriend, Graeme Watkins, and his two friends.

“Graeme was still studying. To make ends meet he was a performing waiter, and he made up a musical trio with two of his friends. My mom ran a theatre company, Think Theatre, that produced and booked Shakespearean theatre productions for matric students, so I just booked him gigs through her business.”

At the same time Kim was also realising that she hated castings. “They irritated me, but they were the way the industry works. I started questioning where my place was within this industry I loved.” It was becoming clear to her that what she actually loved was being behind the scenes — integral to the magic, but not necessarily in the limelight.

Few people know what they want before they start doing it

Careers change and develop, and so do businesses. Kim’s business would pivot many times in the future, but this was the start of her realisation that nothing is ever set in stone.

And then in 2009, Graeme auditioned for Idols SA — and made the top 16. The couple packed up their lives in Cape Town, got into Kim’s Toyota Tazz, and moved to Joburg. Graeme was that year’s runner up, and the couple realised they needed to leverage the exposure.

The move also triggered Kim’s entrepreneurial spirit. “I took to the road with Graeme, managing his sound and focusing on quality control during his performances. I quickly noticed the importance of a manager who could ensure that artists weren’t taken advantage of and who could stipulate what guidelines were part of the agreement and contract. We decided I would road manage his events going forward.

“At the time, I had a lot of people asking me to be their manager or if they could join my agency, but I wanted to work with Graeme; I knew that together we could do something incredible. Both my parents are entrepreneurs, and I’d seen my dad rise and fall in his various endeavors over the years. I knew the risks, but I also knew the rewards. And that was what I was focused on.

I’m an all or nothing person.

kim-coppen-watkins

“I wanted to maintain and own my own ideas. Make them flourish for me. And I was willing to take the risk to do it. I was young, stupid and ballsy, but I guess that’s what you have to be if you want to take this path.”

Launching the Graeme Watkins Project

Together, Graeme and Kim developed Graeme’s rock band, The Graeme Watkins Project, as well as a strategy to launch and grow the band’s foothold in the local music industry.

“We spent a year developing GWP, and I worked exclusively with Graeme. You have to build awareness, generate publicity and manage the tour. To do it right, it needed my full attention.”

As Kim’s business grew, she took on other artists and then realised that the music industry, like all industries, has highs and lows. “We hit a dip and decided we needed a new strategy. All artists need to remain current and fresh if they want to maintain momentum. During a dip on the music side, we secured a presenting job on television with Vodacom Millionaires. This has been running for six years, and has been the foundation for the presenting and MC side of the business.

“Alongside this strategy, we needed a multi-faceted plan for his career. When the rock band side of his brand was quiet because GWP was recording a new album, we decided to create a more collaborative endeavor with Swing City.” Swing City is a collaborative trio between Graeme, and fellow musicians Nathan Ro and Loyiso Bala.

“You can be involved in something creative but you still need to be tactical and strategic about growth.”

“That’s true of any business, and I realised it was why I loved management. As an agent your focus is on procuring work for your clients, but management is what drives me. Management is more strategic in that it combines various elements paramount to the success of your artist’s brand. It’s about taking risks; choosing when to release certain songs to generate spin off on radio and retail; and touring when the song has reached a certain point on radio.

“To get this right, you need to know where your markets live, what they do for fun, and how to engage with them. It’s creative, challenging, and very exciting. However, I believe artists should have both an agent and a manager, which is why I’ve hired specific people in my company to handle the agency side, so that I can focus on management strategy. We work closely together though, and strive for the same goals.”

Make choices as you grow

In all businesses, choices have to be made as you grow, and this was Kim’s first strategic decision for her own business. From there, she was able to implement the lessons she had learnt to build other collaborations, corporate acts and development projects, including The Buzz, a teen band for the youth market.

And then everything changed again. In 2014 Kim was approached by Idols SA to take over the management of the top ten just as she found out she was pregnant. “I took it, and decided not to let them know that there was another life changing event going on.

“I’ve never worked so hard in my life. Taking on ten artists who have no brand and often a very confused idea of the industry is very challenging. We are there to provide guidance and a starting platform for the rest of their career, which I believe is a big responsibility.

Related: Shark Tank’s Dawn Nathan-Jones: How Leaders Who Focus On Growth Will Build Successful Companies

“You have to know who you are and what you want.”

“Up until that point I’d had a lot of side projects and different roles. I needed to decide what I wanted to be, and what I wanted the business to look like. I didn’t want to dilute myself, and at that point I was spread far too thin.

“I was running the business solo, had five core artists that I was manager and agent to, and then the Idols contract came along and I absorbed an additional ten artists. I was at a point where expanding my staff base was the only viable solution.

“The next decision was whether we would be a small, exclusive solution for artists and clients, or if we wanted to be a big agency that has 100 faces on the wall. I believe my personal management style lends itself to small and exclusive.

“I’m forever grateful for the timing that put this all into perspective for me. I had been building up my clients’ careers, as well as my own name within the industry. The Idols contract was a windfall, but trying to juggle so much while being pregnant made me take a step back and critically analyse what I wanted my business to be.

“Up until that point, I would have said I wanted to build an empire. My brand was strong enough to set me on that path. But that’s not who I wanted us to be.

“It took a growth surge to make me realise what direction I wanted to take my business in, and where we needed to focus our energies. I’m a creative; I’m OCD and a control freak. I want a personal touch with my artists; plus, I understand the reality TV business, and it’s unique.

“Reality TV musicians have a psyche that needs a personal touch, because the hard work really starts when they’re voted out, and they need to earn a place in the industry. You need to be able to leverage that brief period of stardom without losing hope because you’ve gone from zero to hero and back to zero. And that’s my niche.

“One of the greatest elements of the Idols account has been working under the guidance of the international management team. They have taught me so much over the last two years, and the insight into traction in international territories has given me a new direction to explore within my business.

“They’ve been an excellent guiding force in understanding the psyche of artists coming out of the reality show mould, which has assisted me greatly in trying to restructure my artists’ mind sets to continue with their passion,” says Kim.

“It’s not always easy to find that balance between reward and growth.”

“Often we’re so busy looking at the next goal post, and the next level of growth, that we forget to really think about what we want our businesses to be.

“We do this to fulfil a need and build a long-lasting brand and legacy. We should take the time to think about what we want that to look like, and how it should be operating.”

Nadine Todd is the Managing Editor of Entrepreneur Magazine, the How-To guide for growing businesses. Find her on Google+.

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Business Advice for Women Entrepreneurs

Rapelang Rabana’s Innovation Formula – 3 Key Ingredients To Innovate

To be a success in today’s fast paced world, you need innovation at the heart of everything you do.

Nadine Todd

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The innovation formula is simple: According to tech entrepreneur Rapelang Rabana, innovation is at its best and greatest when it’s sourced from your unique perspective and accumulated wisdom, combined with shared value and execution.

At this year’s BCX Disrupt Summit, Rapelang broke the process down into the three key ingredients that together shape innovation and success.

1. Prepare your mind

Your ability to innovate and be creative is based on the sum of all of your experiences. Great ideas do not take shape in our minds, they are the result of external stimulus hitting a prepared mind. We don’t think up ideas — we notice them. We connect the dots in new and creative ways. And our ability to do so is based on how prepared we are to notice what’s happening around us, and to tap into that information.

When asked what it takes to be great like Richard Branson, Steve Jobs and Elon Musk, Musk’s ex-wife, Justine Musk had this advice to offer:

“Shift your focus away from what you want (a billion dollars) and get deeply, intensely curious about what the world wants and needs. It helps to have an ego, but you must be in service to something bigger if you are to inspire the people you need to help you.”

Related: 10 Young Entrepreneurs Under 30 Share Their Start-Up Secrets

So, ask yourself this: What do you have that is so deeply compelling and needed that no one can outsource you or replace you? Until you can answer this question, keep building your mind, your abilities and your knowledge. Work on your repository, and your ability to connect the dots.

2. Create shared value

thato-kgatlhanye-bagsThato Kgatlhanye, founder of the Rethaka foundation, an organisation that creates school bags that are also solar panels, and can provide schoolgoers with energy in the evening so that they can do their homework, says that she is money-driven, business-driven, and empathetic towards her people. In other words, her business is created through shared value, and the desire to not only create money for her business, but within her communities as well.

Most successful organisations would never have been launched  if their primary focus was for the business to win. People are hungry for things that are inclusive and show positive change.

Consider Airbnb — the founders had the audacity to put a blow-up mattress in their livingroom, and believe that other people would find value in their offering. And they were right, mainly because the business model is all inclusive. The business wins, the hosts win and the customers win.

According to Nielsen, 40% more social entrepreneurs are growing compared to other SMEs, and they’re showing greater profit. In addition, people say they are more likely to purchase from ethical and sustainable businesses. The cynics might say this is what people say, not how they buy. This may be true, but it’s also a leading indicator of how we will behave in the future. We’re trying to get there, and our behaviour will catch up to the sentiment.

Always be cognisant of how responsive the market is. Learn to leverage public sentiment and get attention through the ideal of shared value. Winning with others is the fastest way to create value today.

Related: 20 South African Side-Hustles You Can Start This Weekend

3. Get stuff done

When we start a project or idea, we try to project into the future. We want to draw a linear picture between now and then. The problem is that creation is far more chaotic.

Instead, minute variations over time create profound changes. It’s a journey. There are no defining moments of success or failure; just a series of events strung together over time. To make the necessary minute variations though, you need data points and you need to take action. Often this starts with just beginning. If you start, you can move forward, slowly but surely. Progress is far more evolutionary than simply trying to imagine the end.

The problem is that the mind blocks us. We essentially block ourselves from success. How? Building anything and trying to be innovative requires a series of many, many decisions made over years and years. Many of those decisions are made — or not made — from a place of fear. Our instincts tell us to do something, and then our minds stop us. The most incredible things can happen if we learn to follow our instincts though.

the-five-second-rule-mel-robbinsIn her book, The Five Second Rule, Mel Robbins unpacks the skill of acting on your instincts. In essence, the space between your instinct and the moment of hesitation that stops you from acting is five seconds. This means you have five seconds to make things happen, and the way to utilise that time and to make things happen is to count down from five: 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. At one, move. Get up, take action, call the client, speak to your boss — don’t let fear come in and crush the instinct.

Why a countdown? A countdown suspends — for a moment — the self-doubt that gives you space to move before the brain kills it. I started using the rule for small stuff at first. A countdown in the morning to get out of bed and go to gym. Then I started using it for the harder stuff, like not losing my temper. If you can be aware enough to make the countdown, you can change your behaviour.

The ability to execute and turn innovation into profit comes down to a series of five-second moments over years. Push yourself. Get past your mental blocks and act on your instinct.

Combine this with building on your knowledge, connecting the dots around you, and understanding that value is not given or taken, but is created through shared value, and you have the recipe for innovation and success.


IN YOUR TOOLKIT

Focus on learning new stuff

FACT: The super-successful focus heavily on learning new skills, reading practical books and listening or watching podcasts, interviews and informational courses.

Take best-selling author and leadership coach Simon Sinek, who said:

“My work is never complete, we wake up with a hunger to learn, and no one is ever truly an expert. Anyone who says, ‘I’m an expert at anything’ has closed their mind to the idea that they might not know everything. There’s always more to learn. I’ve never considered myself an expert. I’m always a student of leadership. All the work is imperfect and all the learning is continuous.”

Action Step: If you can read 20 full pages a day, or even listen to an hour-long audio/podcast, you will accumulate more than 36+ books a year of new knowledge.

Start here: If you’re not sure where to start, download the audible app (audible.com) and browse the business books available, or subscribe to podcasts. Three great places to begin are:

  • Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson, a show focused on disruption and hosted by the biographer of Steve Jobs, Albert Einstein and Benjamin Franklin amongst others.
  • The Tim Ferriss Show, hosted by Tim Ferriss and one of the biggest podcasts on the planet.
  • Masters of Scale, hosted by LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman, who chats to some of the worlds biggest and most successful entrepreneurs.

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Women Entrepreneur Successes

Uzenzele Holdings Co-founders Nadia And Zahra Rawjee’s Top Advice On Building A Service-based Business

Nadia and Zahra Rawjee of Uzenzele Holdings know what businesses need, and they understand the struggles that founders go through, which is why the pair often understand their clients’ needs before the first meeting has even taken place.

Nadine Todd

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Vital stats

  • Players: Nadia Rawjee and Zahra Rawjee
  • Company: Uzenzele Holdings
  • Est: 2012
  • Visit: www.uzenzele.com
  • About: Uzenzele Holdings is a consultancy that focuses on business development and accessing governmental funding for business expansion projects. The company uses its expertise to help clients navigate the complex process of applying for government and developmental funding, helping to unlock funds and opportunities that many entrepreneurs aren’t aware of.

Sisters Nadia and Zahra Rawjee grew up in a family business, so they understand the challenges that the average SME faces. They also realise that the average entrepreneur is unaware of the opportunities available to him or her when it comes to government and developmental funding.

“We realised what an impact government and developmental funding could have had on the family business, but like so many SMEs, it never accessed the funds available,” says Zahra Rawjee.

The fact of the matter is, many business owners are unaware of the funds that are available through government. Others, meanwhile, do not think that they would qualify, or they think that delving into this ocean of bureaucracy would simply not be worth the effort. This is a mistake. It can absolutely be worth the effort.

“Companies looking to grow can access millions through government,” says Nadia Rawjee. “We’ve seen clients receiving tens of millions in funding.”

That said, there is some truth in the view that accessing these funds is sometimes difficult. The application process can be complex, and the process as a whole can be a long one. However, if you know what you’re doing, you can get funded.

Related: Uzenzele Holdings Unpacks The How And Where Of Business Funding

Because the Rawjees understood the challenges that businesses faced, and they possessed the arcane (and often shifting) information needed to access these funds, they decided to launch a consultancy that would assist clients in the process. Uzenzele Holdings has now been around for more than five years and has helped many clients secure funding. As you might expect, theirs is a business driven by relationships. Here’s their advice for building a successful service-driven operation.

1. Know thy customer

As mentioned, Nadia and Zahra understand the wants and needs of their clients, even when the clients themselves don’t. “We find that many clients underestimate the amount of capital they’ll need to make their growth and expansion plans a reality. They go into the process looking to raise less money than they’ll actually need, which can result in disastrous cash flow problems down the line. Because we know this, we can advise them accordingly. If you  don’t understand your clients’ businesses, it’s tough to give them the right advice.

KEY LESSON: True success comes from becoming a trusted advisor to your clients. This can only happen if you have real empathy for your clients, and if you understand their businesses intimately. Without these two characteristics, any relationship will be purely transactional.

2. Follow the market

uzenzele-holdingsFollowing your passion is admirable, but it doesn’t mean that you should ignore the realities of the market in the process. To their credit, Nadia and Zahra initially wanted to focus on small/micro businesses because they believed that this was the area where they could make the biggest impact. However, they quickly learnt that these businesses were so cash strapped and focused on survival, that they weren’t looking at growth, and they didn’t have the money needed to invest in advisory services.

As consultants themselves, they decided to invest in advisors who could help them reposition the company. “We brought in marketers who helped us reposition Uzenzele Holdings and make it visible to the companies who were actually looking for our services.”

KEY LESSON: Don’t make any assumptions about the market. Your target audience might not be where you think it is. In fact, your ideal audience might be very different from the one you have in your head. It’s worth spending time and money to find out exactly who your ideal audience is, and where they can be reached.

Related: Feel Like Quitting? These 9 Women Prove Grit Can Lead You To Massive Success

3. Educate your audience

Because so many of Uzenzele Holdings’ clients are unaware of the funding options available, knowledge transfer is an important activity for the consultancy. “You have to be willing to give out information freely,” says Zahra. “For this reason, we have a blog on our website, we do talks at conferences, and we contribute to business publications.”

“At the moment, for example, we are focusing on the Black Industrialist Programme through the DTI, and funding available for agro processing. There are great opportunities open to those looking for funding, but people don’t know about it,” says Nadia.

KEY LESSON: Signing clients is nearly impossible when they don’t understand what you’re offering. For this reason, you need to see education as part of the selling process. The payoff might only come way down the line, but that’s not an excuse to ignore the process.

4. Network

Speaking at conferences and writing articles for publications not only educates potential clients, it also builds the Uzenzele Holdings brand and ups the profile of the Rawjee sisters. “Networking is important,” says Nadia. “You have to be out there — you need to get to know people, and they need to get to know you. It takes time and work, but you have to do it. Networking is important in any business.”

“You shouldn’t underestimate the value of LinkedIn when it comes to networking. It’s a great place to connect, and post content. When it comes to the B2B space, LinkedIn is definitely one of the best platforms,” says Zahra.

KEY LESSON: You have to build your brand and get to know people. Most young companies land their first clients because of connections and referrals. To succeed, you have to establish yourself as a presence in your industry. You can do this by joining organisations, attending conferences and going out of your way to connect with others.


Your funding checklist

Understand what you need. There’s a basic checklist to follow:

  • Do you need money for working or operating expenditure vs capital investment?
  • How much do you require?
  • How long do you need the money for?
  • What is the cost of capital you can afford to repay?

Armed with this knowledge, you can start finding the right fund or finance vehicle for your needs.

Related: Funding And Financial Assistance For SA Women Entrepreneurs

Funders have different criteria:

  • Turnover: mainly grants
  • Profitability: loans/grants
  • Balance sheet: loans/grants
  • Ability to scale: venture capital

Funders tend to have between two and 26 different funds, each with their own mandate, eligibility criteria, funding type (loan or grant), costing, things they will and won’t fund and other specifics. Read the mandates to find your fit.

Call and speak to the funders and be fund specific. Speak to a consultant at the fund to clarify your eligibility before starting the application process.

Ask questions around:

  • Their timelines
  • When the credit committees or panels sit for adjudication
  • What is considered for your application to get adjudicated.

Arming yourself with this knowledge will exponentially increase your chances of being considered for funding. Many applications do not reach the adjudication phase because the business doesn’t match the fund or the application is incorrectly filled in.

You cannot receive funding if your application is not even considered. The correct content and format is vital.

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Women Entrepreneur Successes

Pet Wellness Worx Found Business Success In Rehabilitating Pets

Lorren Barham, the founder of Pet Wellness Worx, spoke to Entrepreneur about the challenges of launching a business in a relatively unknown industry.

Nadine Todd

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lorren-barham

Vital stats

  • Player: Lorren Barham
  • Company: Pet Wellness Worx
  • Est: 2014
  • About: Lorren Barham is the owner and operator of the hydro underwater treadmill and therapist-in-the-pool facility of Pet Wellness Worx. The business specialises in the health, wellbeing and rehabilitative care of pets.
  • Visit: petwellnessworx.co.za

Certain business ideas are obvious, others aren’t. In a world where many founders are looking to create ‘the Uber of this’ or ‘the Uber of that’, a company that offers rehabilitative care for pets might seem like a niche lifestyle business.

But Lorren Barham’s Pet Wellness Worx has seen fantastic growth over the last three years precisely because it is so niche. Lorren identified a relatively unexploited niche and owned it.

In the modern business world where all the obvious opportunities have already been jumped at, success lies in finding that small but promising industry that is ripe for growth. Not that launching a start-up in this sort of space is easy, mind you. Chances are, you’ll need to educate consumers and grow your company slowly, but if you get the basics right, you can establish a sustainable operation with excellent long-term prospects.

1. How did you identify this unique business opportunity?

I did not have a background in the field, but I’ve always had an intense passion for animals, and because of my own pets, I knew about auto immune disorders like degenerative myelopathy, neurological spinal prolapse and hip dysplasia.

Related: Feel Like Quitting? These 9 Women Prove Grit Can Lead You To Massive Success

Over the years, some of my own animals had to deal with these issues, so I understood that there was a need for a facility that could assist with rehabilitation. So, going into the industry wasn’t a purely tactical business decision — I had a real passion for the work. I think that’s important. You can’t pursue a business idea simply because you think there’s an opportunity in it. You need to be passionate about it. When times are tough, it’s your passion that’ll keep you going.

2. What is your background?

Pet Wellness Worx

I have a corporate background. I started out as a personal assistant, and over the years, I furthered my education, completing courses in fields like bookkeeping and business administration. When I opened my own business, I found that the knowledge and experience I gained in the corporate environment was immensely useful. Procuring expensive equipment, for instance, was less intimidating because I knew how to deal with suppliers and negotiate a fair deal.

You don’t need an MBA, necessarily, but you need some basic business knowledge. You could be a great specialist in your specific field, but running your own business is something very different. As an entrepreneur, you wear a lot of hats, and you have to manage every aspect of the company — you have to manage employees, balance the books and do the marketing — so you need to educate yourself on the basics of running a business.

3. How did you prepare for the launch of the business?

I did a lot of research. I spent months figuring out exactly what sort of services I should provide, and how I should structure the business. Importantly, I had a goal and a mission. It helps to know what your ultimate goal is. Figure out what you want to achieve, and then do plenty of research. Take your time. Solid research will prevent you from making mistakes that can be costly down the line.

Related: Women Leaders In Business: 5 Lessons Learnt

4. How did you market the business in the early days?

We focused on qualified veterinarians. Not only could they refer clients to the business, but it was also clear that in order for the company to succeed, buy-in from them was necessary. So, I spent a lot of time at veterinarians’ offices. I had to show them that I was running a legitimate business that could do real good.

Whenever you operate in a niche area, you need to realise that some education will be necessary. You need to explain the value that you bring to potential customers, and to other important decision-makers in the field.

As the company built a solid track record, and I could show vets the improvement brought on by our rehab work, we started getting more and more clients. I truly ascribe a lot of our recent success to the fact that the vets embraced us.

5. What other marketing strategies have worked for you?

It’s very important to know exactly who you’re targeting. We’re very targeted in our approach. We go to animal shows and events, and we run adds on websites like showdogs.co.za, since these are places that we know we’ll find our target audience. Facebook is another great place to showcase the work that we do. Another strategy that has worked for me has been to write articles for publication.

Related: Funding And Financial Assistance For SA Women Entrepreneurs

As mentioned earlier, it’s important to educate potential customers, and a great way to do this is through editorial. I’ve written articles for magazines and websites, and media companies have generally been willing to run them. If you write an informative article that’s suitable for publication, you can get your name out in that way.

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