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How Do I Start A Transport Or Logistics Business?

An all in one guide to starting a transport and logistics business.

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Thinking about starting a transport business?

Forecasts indicate that the demand for freight transport will grow in South Africa by between 200% and 250% over the 15 to 20 years.

Some corridors, (high volume transport routes that connect major centres), such as the corridors between Gauteng and Cape Town (which amount to 50% of all corridor transport) will increase even faster.

The scope in the transport and logistics industry is varied – from a one-man show using a small truck to transport goods and offer services, to a fleet of transport vehicles which travel the length and breadth of South Africa’s roads.

Road transportation includes commuter transport from taxis to bus transportation.

It can be a tough industry and there are many threats facing transport businesses but if you get it right, you can build a successful business.

What is covered in this guide:

  1. How to start your transport and logistics business
  2. How to get funding for your transport business
  3. What are the costs involved
  4. Finding customers and getting transport contracts
  5. Getting onto suppliers lists
  6. Buying trucks and employing drivers
  7. What are the regulations and risks
  8. Where to find guidance to start your business.

Ready to get going? Click the arrow button to learn how to start your own transport business.

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30 Comments

30 Comments

  1. naughtyjockey

    Sep 2, 2013 at 16:02

    Nice Stuff 🙂

  2. Mabhiza Mshengu

    Jan 28, 2014 at 11:33

    That’s sounds cool but what if you owe perhaps R380 000 and you want consolidate that debts is it possible for you people to help?

  3. Nathi Jali

    Feb 7, 2014 at 14:01

    Thank you

  4. refiloe

    Jun 21, 2014 at 05:02

    I am woman and very interested in transport businesses. I do not qualify for any loans in any bank.can the bank consider my proposal when I have contract?

    • Drewzie

      Aug 9, 2016 at 10:50

      yes, a bank will fund your business a long as you have a contract
      and it proves that you afford paying bank the loan monthly.I work for the bank and i am also interested in starting my own thing.Please contact me on gmail: getandrews@gmail.com

  5. Corne

    Aug 17, 2014 at 23:43

    Hi
    Me and my partner want to start a transport company, the question is what type of vehchile wil suite the goods? We transport mostly dry fruit and mechanical items? Sould we go for tonnage or cm3?And what system for invoicing is good to start with?

  6. Kanelo Temeki

    Aug 25, 2014 at 11:20

    Good Day,
    I have a 22 seater bus which I can contract to any company either to transport their staff to and from work, but I am struggling to get contracts, can anyone help if you do have information or know of any clients that might be interested in such services

    • Hlelo

      Aug 2, 2016 at 17:50

      Hi Kanelo. M also starting a transport business. Can u please contact me on 078 700 5417. M in Dbn.

  7. NEO

    Aug 26, 2014 at 08:39

    my wife and i want to start a transport business, and looking to get an Anvanza>>>which companies can we target to render our services, we live in the vaal ( Vereeniging,Vanderbjilpark) any ideas??

  8. NEO

    Aug 26, 2014 at 08:39

    my wife and i want to start a transport business, and looking to get an Anvanza>>>which companies can we target to render our services, we live in the vaal ( Vereeniging,Vanderbjilpark) any ideas??

  9. vincent

    Mar 5, 2015 at 11:56

    hi I’m 30 years I’ve started a logistic company last year 2014 I’m willing to get a contract from any division just to assist in transport goods problem I don’t have a truck and the bank want a contract for them to finance 1 or two trucks for me so please help me with your opinion where to start?

  10. Tshephiso Gafane

    Jul 25, 2015 at 18:47

    Hi, I have a kia k2700 bakkie looking to start transport company, I am struggling to get contracts and small services refuse removals, furniture and office movers. I want to grow the business any tips guidelines will be very much apprecited

  11. Rudie

    Sep 4, 2015 at 09:26

    I’m thinking of exploring the transport business and have some questions, how to kick it off, which market is the best and would it be financially feasible, how to get a contract, what is the running cost, etc. Any information / assistance would be greatly appreciated. Please email me to rudie.oosthuizen@outlook.com

  12. Yvonne Madilola

    Dec 8, 2015 at 21:10

    Hi. My partner and I have just purchased a super link side tipper. It is packed outside my house for a month now. I want to get it started working ASAP. I’m in northwest Klerksdorp. I have a registered company. Please advice where to look for contracts. I’m good with starting with a 3 month contract.

    • Damien

      Jan 5, 2016 at 13:51

      Hi Yvonne, Email me geshann@hotmail.com we can talk. thanks

    • Natalie Van Wyk

      Apr 25, 2016 at 12:02

      Hi Yvonne, can you please let me know if you had any successes, I am interested?

    • Natalie Van Wyk

      Apr 25, 2016 at 12:02

      Hi Yvonne, can you please let me know if you had any successes, I am interested?

    • July Mathibela

      Jul 26, 2016 at 17:11

      Hi Yvonne be aware there are lot of scams in this business so be in the look out dont trust people if they say they can assist you do your homework find out about that person first and check all the references and you must see where he operates and the trucks if he is transportation coal go and see where is operating. I lost R460K last year transporting coal from Mtubatuba to Richardsbay I worked for mahala till today.

    • Hlelo

      Aug 2, 2016 at 17:56

      Hi Yvonne. M interested in that kind of business. Please email me at bc.simakade@gmail.com

    • jonas moabelo

      Aug 13, 2016 at 15:34

      Hi Yvonne,may i kindly have your numbers,mine is 0836992213

  13. michael braai wood

    Jan 13, 2016 at 15:10

    Hi I am Michael. I have two NP300 diesel bakkies and two trailers plus a 2 ton truck in Phalaborwa and also operate in Polokwane(LIMPOPO), I sell (dry hard) braai wood( ROOISBOS, HARDEKOOL, KNOPDORING, SEKELBOS, MOPANI ETC) Anyone who want to be a distributor( business opportunity) is welcome to contact me on pilusa1983@gmail.com and 0734068875. We can deliver to your warehouse at a cost around the country.

  14. Tebogom

    Apr 12, 2016 at 19:27

    I have 2 Mercedes Benz crew buses 7 and a 6 seater, am looking for companies that I can render a service for. Contact tebogo@martebshuttle.co.za

  15. Katlego Rakgatjane

    Apr 26, 2016 at 15:58

    Hi. I have just purchased a VW Caddy panel van. It is packed for a months now. I want to get it started working ASAP. I’m in Gauteng Mamelodi. I have a registered company. Please advice where to look for contracts. I’m good with starting with a 3 month contract.Contact admin@skepeholdings.co.za

  16. Mbulelo Madlala

    May 15, 2016 at 23:46

    i am a male ,i own a vw T5 ,10 seater and i would to start transport business ,which companies should i consider

    • Hlelo

      Aug 2, 2016 at 17:53

      hi Mbulelo. M interested to negotiate with u. Kindly contact me at 078 700 5417

  17. Takalani

    Jul 14, 2016 at 14:00

    Hi
    we are in logistics and transportation company for almost 10 years but its difficult to have the new clients or customer since then we are serving the same peopls, we having flet deck, box trailer, tri axle and we do all the tone, may you please assist where can we go about to get the new client…

  18. princess

    Aug 19, 2016 at 15:03

    hi im looking to start a transport business but I need advice on the steps to take in order to be able to be get clients and the risk involved in this kind of business. thanks

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Start-up Industry Specific

How To Start A Farming Business

Keep these nine points in mind when launching your new farming business.

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Start-up Industry Specific

How Do I Start A Security Company In South Africa?

There are two kinds of security companies, one that sells products and one that sells services or you can combine both.

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To start a security service company in South Africa you must register with the Private Security Regulatory Authority (SIRA). There are two kinds of security companies, one that sells products and one that sells services or you can combine both. It is estimated that the private security industry in South Africa employs over 400 000 individuals.

If you’re looking at starting a security guard company in South Africa, the following guide will be able to assist you in the deciding if it’s the right decision for you.

You need a lot of capital

Starting a security business requires a good deal of capital outlay and it’s highly recommended that one should have a background in this field.

Decide what kind of company you want to start

There are two kinds of security companies, one that sells products and one that sells services or you can combine both. Each sector falls under its own regulatory body.

What about area competition?

Greg Margolis is the CEO of NYPD Security, a niche security company that has operated for the last five years in the leafy northern suburbs of Johannesburg.

“To run your own security service company I think that you have to be well rounded in terms of not just being a good business person, but you also have to be a people person, a marketing person and know a good deal about the business.

“There’s tough competition, but I love what I do and wouldn’t sell my business even if I was offered triple what its worth. I am passionate about what I do”, says Margolis.

Starting a Security Services Business

To start a security service company in South Africa you must register with the Private Security Regulatory Authority (PSIRA). This includes paying a registration fee of R2 280 and writing an exam. Once you have passed the exam, proved that you do not have a criminal record, SIRA will conduct an inspection to establish whether or not your business meets the infrastructure requirements. A further fee of R1 710 is charged for the assessment. Each year the business is re-accessed which costs a further R500 plus the annual renewal fee or R520.

The following documentation is required for registration:

  1. An authenticated copy of the CM1, CM2, CM27, CM29, CM31 and CM 46 (apply at Registrar of Companies or Attorneys), if the applicant is a company;
  2. An authenticated copy of the Partnership Agreement if the applicant is a partnership;
  3. An authenticated copy of the trust deed and the letter of authorisation to the trustees from the Master of the High Court if the applicant is a business trust

Related:Steps for Setting the Right Prices for Your Security Business

Also required:

  1. The Suretyship form (SIRA 4) to be signed by the natural person who has taken full responsibility of the security business
  2. Every director, member, partner (as the case may be) applying for registration as a security business must have successfully completed, at a training establishment accredited in terms of law, at least, the training courses Grade E to B
  3. An authenticated copy of the Tax Clearance Certificate from the South African Revenue Service (SARS)
  4. An authenticated copy of the VAT Registration Number from SARS.
  5. An authenticated copy of the PAYE number from SARS
  6. An authenticated copy of the COID number (Compensation for Occupational Injuries & Diseases) from the Department of Labour
  7. Sufficient information in writing to enable the Authority to ascertain that the applicant security business meets the requirements with regard to the infrastructure and capacity necessary to render a security service;

This include, inter alia, the following:

  1. Submit a business plan to the Authority including the location and activities
  2. A resolution by the applicant security business stating that it will be able to operate for the next year
  3. The applicant proves that it has an administrative office that is accessible to the inspectors of the SIRA
  4. The applicant must have equipment which is necessary for the management and administration of the security business, e.g. fixed telephone, fax machine, a hard copy or electronic filing system for the orderly keeping of all records and documentation
  5. Show that the affairs of the applicant security business are managed and controlled by appropriately experienced, trained and skilled persons
  6. The applicant security business has at its disposal a sufficient number of registered and appropriately trained and skilled security officers for the rendering of a security service for which it has contracted or is likely to contract
  7. The security officers must be properly controlled and supervised
  8. The applicant security officer has at its disposal sufficient and adequately skilled administrative staff members for the administration of the affairs of the applicant
  9. The business must have has all the necessary equipment, including vehicles,  uniforms, clothing and equipment that must be issued to its security officers
  10. The applicant security business is in lawful possession of the firearms and other weapons that are necessary offer security services in respect of which it has contracted.

Related: Get going with a One Page Business Plan

Landing contracts

security-contract

The most important thing you can do to start and operate your own business is to develop a good business plan.

It’s invaluable because the business plan forces you to come to terms with your business. Selling the business concept seems to the problem, said Margolis. These are his five tips that will help to get the business going.

“The security industry in South Africa is very competitive. You have to get out there and you have to keep knocking on doors, there isn’t an easy solution”, explains Margolis.

Top Tips

1. Look at your business plan and decide if you have a competitive advantage. If not, work out how you can make the market understand the unique value your small business has to offer.

2. It is important to make yourself known. It isn’t difficult or expensive to increase awareness about the business. Attend ratepayer meetings, spend time at the local police stations, and attend meetings the police have with residents and businesses in the area. This way people get to know you and respect you and half the battle is won. Networking is the way to go.

3. It’s my experience that bigger companies are reluctant to give security contracts to a company that is a one-man show. Make sure that you have a structure in place. Clients need to know if something happens to you, the business will not fall apart, and the services they have paid for and you have agreed to supply, will not cease. Clients need to understand that besides experience, that you are credible and that all the checks and balances are in place. This must be one of the key selling points.

4. Consider taking on a partner. Choose a partner who has the attributes that you lack. The ideal partner would be one with strong links and contacts in the community that you want to work with. Let your partner control the selling side while you handle areas you’re strong in, such as expertise and service delivery. The other option is to employ sales staff.

5. Stay abreast of new trends in the field, and update your skills. This is something that I strongly believe in. You have to be well rounded in terms of not just being a good businessperson, but you also have to be a people person, a marketing and sales manager and know a good deal about the neighbourhoods you work.

 

Are you new to starting a business? Read 15 Things Every Newbie Needs to Know About Starting a Business

Security products

What are the requirements to start a security product supplier business?

If you are starting a security company that sells electronic alarm systems and other security products it’s wise to become a member of SAIDSA in order to provide your business with the credibility it needs to be taken seriously by the public and security service providers.

The objective of SAIDSA is to upgrade the quality and standards of electronic security and to protect the public from unscrupulous, “fly-by-night” operators. When a security system is purchased, an ongoing relationship is entered into between the purchaser and the security service company concerned.

The security service product supplier must have the infrastructure and the required expertise to support the relationship continuously.

Security Sector Regulatory Bodies

The security industry has established a number of bodies to regulate itself. Membership in these bodies is voluntary. They include:

Ready to get going? Here’s 10 Steps to Start Your Business For Free (Almost)

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How does one go about starting a distribution business? Or how do you become a seller for an international company locally (SA)?

How to register an international product nationally.

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If you already have a particular product you are thinking of distributing, your best option would be to contact that company and find out what the requirements are to distribute their products. Each company will have different criteria.

Here is some advice however on starting a wholesale distribution business:

So you want to start a wholesale distributorship. Whether you’re currently a white-collar professional, a manager worried about being downsized, or bored with your current job, this may be the right business for you. Much like the merchant traders of the 18th century, you’ll be trading goods for profit.

And while the romantic notion of standing on a dock in the dead of night haggling over a tea shipment may be a bit far-fetched, the modern-day wholesale distributor evolved from those hardy traders who bought and sold goods hundreds of years ago.

The Distributor’s Role

As you probably know, manufacturers produce products and retailers sell them to end users. A can of motor oil, for example, is manufactured and packaged, then sold to automobile owners through retail outlets and/or repair shops.

In between, however, there are a few key operators-also known as distributors-that serve to move the product from manufacturer to market. Some are retail distributors, the kind that sell directly to consumers (end users).

Others are known as merchant wholesale distributors; they buy products from the manufacturer or other source, then move them from their warehouses to companies that either want to resell the products to end users or use them in their own operations.

Three types of operations can perform the functions of wholesale trade: wholesale distributors; manufacturers’ sales branches and offices; and agents, brokers and commission agents. As a wholesale distributor, you will probably run an independently owned and operated firm that buys and sells products of which you have taken ownership.

Generally, such operations are run from one or more warehouses where inventory goods are received and later shipped to customers.

Put simply, as the owner of a wholesale distributorship, you will be buying goods to sell at a profit, much like a retailer would. The only difference is that you’ll be working in a business-to-business realm by selling to retail companies and other wholesale firms like your own, and not to the buying public.

This is, however, somewhat of a traditional definition. The traditional wholesale distributor is still the one who buys “from the source” and sells to a reseller.

Getting Into the Game

The field of wholesale distribution is a true buying and selling game-one that requires good negotiation skills, a nose for sniffing out the next “hot” item in your particular category, and keen salesmanship. The idea is to buy the product at a low price, then make a profit by tacking on an amount that still makes the deal attractive to your customer.

Experts agree that to succeed in the wholesale distribution business, an individual should possess a varied job background. Most experts feel a sales background is necessary, as are the “people skills” that go with being an outside salesperson who hits the streets and/or picks up the phone and goes on a cold-calling spree to search for new customers.

In addition to sales skills, the owner of a new wholesale distribution company will need the operational skills necessary for running such a company. For example, finance and business management skills and experience are necessary, as is the ability to handle the “back end” (those activities that go on behind the scenes, like warehouse setup and organization, shipping and receiving, customer service, etc.).

Of course, these back-end functions can also be handled by employees with experience in these areas if your budget allows.

Setting Up Shop

When it comes to setting up shop, your needs will vary according to what type of product you choose to specialize in. Someone could conceivably run a successful wholesale distribution business from their home, but storage needs would eventually hamper the company’s success.

Starting Out

For entrepreneurs looking to start their own wholesale distributorship, there are basically three avenues to choose from: buy an existing business, start from scratch or buy into a business opportunity. Buying an existing business can be costly and may even be risky, depending on the level of success and reputation of the distributorship you want to buy.

The positive side of buying a business is that you can probably tap into the seller’s knowledge bank, and you may even inherit his or her existing client base, which could prove extremely valuable.

The second option, starting from scratch, can also be costly, but it allows for a true “make or break it yourself” scenario that is guaranteed not to be preceded by an existing owner’s reputation. On the downside, you will be building a reputation from scratch, which means lots of sales and marketing for at least the first two years or until your client base is large enough to reach critical mass.

The last option is perhaps the most risky, as all business opportunities must be thoroughly explored before any money or precious time is invested. However, the right opportunity can mean support, training and quick success if the originating company has already proven itself to be profitable, reputable and durable.

During the startup process, you’ll also need to assess your own financial situation and decide if you’re going to start your business on a full- or part-time basis. A full-time commitment probably means quicker success, mainly because you will be devoting all your time to the new company’s success.

Like most startups, the average wholesale distributor will need to be in business two to five years to be profitable. There are exceptions, of course. Take, for example, the ambitious entrepreneur who sets up his garage as a warehouse to stock full of small hand tools.

Using his own vehicle and relying on the low overhead that his home provides, he could conceivably start making money within six to 12 months.

Operations

A wholesale distributor’s initial steps when venturing into the entrepreneurial landscape include defining a customer base and locating reliable sources of product. The latter will soon become commonly known as your “vendors” or “suppliers.”

The cornerstone of every distribution cycle, however, is the basic flow of product from manufacturer to distributor to customer. As a wholesale distributor, your position on that supply chain (a supply chain is a set of resources and processes that begins with the sourcing of raw material and extends through the delivery of items to the final consumer) will involve matching up the manufacturer and customer by obtaining quality products at a reasonable price and then selling them to the companies that need them.

In its simplest form, distribution means purchasing a product from a source-usually a manufacturer, but sometimes another distributor-and selling it to your customer. As a wholesale distributor, you will specialize in selling to customers-and even other distributors-who are in the business of selling to end users (usually the general public).

It’s one of the purest examples of the business-to-business function, as opposed to a business-to-consumer function, in which companies sell to the general public.

Weighing It Out: Operating Costs

No two distribution companies are alike, and each has its own unique needs. The entrepreneur who is selling closeout T-shirts from his basement, for example, has very different startup financial needs than the one selling power tools from a warehouse in the middle of an industrial park.

Regardless of where a distributor sets up shop, some basic operating costs apply across the board. For starters, necessities like office space, a telephone, fax machine and personal computer will make up the core of your business. This means an office rental fee if you’re working from anywhere but home, a telephone bill and ISP fees for getting on the internet.

No matter what type of products you plan to carry, you’ll need some type of warehouse or storage space in which to store them; this means a leasing fee. Remember that if you lease a warehouse that has room for office space, you can combine both on one bill. If you’re delivering locally, you’ll also need an adequate vehicle to get around in.

The Day-to-Day Routine

Like many other businesses, wholesale distributors perform sales and marketing, accounting, shipping and receiving, and customer service functions on a daily basis.

They also handle tasks like contacting existing and prospective customers, processing orders, supporting customers who need help with problems that may crop up, and doing market research (for example, who better than the “in the trenches” distributor to find out if a manufacturer’s new product will be viable in a particular market?).

To handle all these tasks and whatever else may come their way during the course of the day, most distributors rely on specialized software packages that tackle such functions as inventory control, shipping and receiving, accounting, client management, and bar-coding.

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