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A Marketing Evolution

Marketing your brand has become very tricky all of a sudden. If you don’t get it right you could fall foul of the law or, even worse, the customer!

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Dr Pieter Streicher, managing director of BulkSMS.com, says too many companies are trapped in a broadcast-only marketing paradigm, which results in annoyed customers and loss of brand equity in the market. The use of SMS as a marketing channel is often regarded in a poor light, as a result.

However, Streicher points out that personalised, permission-based SMS marketing holds great advantages for marketers, and not just because of the technical advances that have made the practice easy and manageable today.

How marketing has changed

Let’s take a look at how quickly and dramatically things have changed. Only a decade ago, marketers had little choice over how they communicated with customers: TV, radio, cinema and print were the primary one-to-many communication channels. Fixed-line telephones were the best way to reach people on a one-to-one basis.

Communication channels abound

Fast-forward to today. The price of telecommunications has dropped and the options for reaching individuals have increased. Is it any wonder that we balk at the thought of listing our email address or mobile phone number in the modern day equivalent of the phone book?

Instead, we embrace walled gardens such as Facebook and other social media where we can control who can communicate with us.

Brands stuck in a broadcast-only world should sit up and take notice of the fact that even though we do guard our privacy fiercely, we do also allow brands into our walled gardens.

These are the brands that resonate with us, share useful and targeted information, ask our opinions and answer our questions, and most importantly, respect our privacy. We want special treatment from the brands we do allow in: this could be as simple as being the first to know a piece of news or to be told of an upcoming sale.

We’ve become used to asking and receiving only the information that we want to see, when we want to see it.

Personalisation is expected

Even the brands who are getting this customer experience right could take it a step further. Take loyalty cards schemes for example. Rather than just asking for permission to contact a customer, ask the customers what information is of interest to them.

So perhaps I want to hear from a chain store about the food offers, but not the clothing sales. Not only will the brand benefit from the goodwill created from sending this targeted information and the increased impact of these targeted messages, they will also save money by not sending customers irrelevant information that simply gets ignored.

Spam as a sales repellent

If this isn’t incentive enough for brands to embrace permission-based marketing, consider this: consumers’ tolerance for unwanted marketing communications has dropped dramatically and for very good reason too.

Digital communication volumes have increased, think about your email inbox and the balance between legitimate and unwanted email, as well as sifting through increasing numbers of unwanted direct marketing messages. It now costs consumers time and money to remove themselves from email and SMS lists.

Rather than suffer in silence, consumers are increasingly harnessing the power of social networks to name and shame companies that disregard their wishes to opt-out from a contact list.

This allows people to compare notes and out the brands that persistently offend consumers. This type of online exposure negatively impacts on a brand’s reputation.

Getting permission is non-negotiable

Brands can’t afford to treat permission-based marketing as an administrative nuisance. They should rather see it as an opportunity to re-connect with their customers, learn about their requirements and initiate valuable conversations.

The tools exist to make this both easy and affordable to do. With the move away from broadcast-only channels of communication to interactive mediums of enabling conversational marketing such as SMS messaging or via social media campaigns, large and small companies have the opportunity to target their niche markets affordably and effectively without resorting to cold calling.

Find out what customers want

The bottom line is that in order to succeed in this world of digital media that is increasingly accessed via a cellphone, brands need to change their broadcast mentality, respect consumer privacy and come to understand why consumers resent unwanted communications so much.

Brands need to start learning about the information their target audience does want and see permission-based marketing as not something to be ignored but as an exciting and cost-effective opportunity to connect with their customers and grow their brand equity in their target market.

Entrepreneur Magazine is South Africa's top read business publication with the highest readership per month according to AMPS. The title has won seven major publishing excellence awards since it's launch in 2006. Entrepreneur Magazine is the "how-to" handbook for growing companies. Find us on Google+ here.

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Business Linkages And Investment Readiness

The Africa Women Innovation & Entrepreneurship Forum (AWIEF) is hosting its flagship Growth Accelerator Programme for 2018, sponsored by Nedbank.

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The Africa Women Innovation & Entrepreneurship Forum (AWIEF) is hosting its flagship Growth Accelerator Programme for 2018, sponsored by Nedbank. AWIEF is seeking 25 ambitious, innovative and committed early-growth-stage South African women entrepreneurs, from a variety of sectors, looking for support to scale their businesses.

Access to finance is the most cited challenge to the growth of women-owned businesses in Africa. Bankability and investment readiness are major impediments to attracting business finance.

This is an intensive six-week programme designed to support participants with the business modelling and growth strategy required to scale their enterprises, become investment ready and develop entrepreneurial leadership. The programme will cover:

  • purpose and values
  • target market, competitive landscape and value proposition
  • delivery model
  • financial modelling
  • conduct a creative force
  • growth strategy
  • financing for scale
  • pitch training.

Related: Watch List: 50 Black African Women Entrepreneurs To Watch

Nirmala Reddy, Senior Manager of Nedbank Enterprise Development, says: ‘We support initiatives such as this in line with our pledge to help clients see money differently, which is aimed at making a difference in South Africa, not just for women and children and business, but also for communities throughout the country. The bank strongly focuses on the development of female employees and black-women-owned suppliers, and this can be seen through our development and training programmes. We are also proud that women make up 62% of the workforce at Nedbank.’

The 2018 AWIEF Growth Accelerator, with its first 25 participants, is implemented as a build-up programme that will culminate at the 2018 AWIEF Conference, Exhibition and Awards event taking place on 8 and 9 November at the Cape Town International Convention Centre, where participating entrepreneurs will pitch their business to an audience of investors, business leaders and corporate decision-makers.

The three best ventures stand to win monetary prizes from AWIEF and financial management advice from Nedbank.

The programme details are as follows:

  • Dates: Starts on 17 September and culminates on 8 and 9 November 2018
  • Location: Cape Town and Johannesburg
  • Participation fee: Free 

Eligibility

Businesses must be:

  • in a post-revenue phase;
  • scalable and innovative ventures;
  • in operation for not less than two years (ideally three to five years);
  • owned or led by ambitious and committed women entrepreneurs; and
  • seeking investment or funding to grow.

If you are interested in participating, click here to apply. Applications close on 31 August 2018.

The event is hosted by AWIEF and sponsored by Nedbank.

Read next: Kid Entrepreneurs Who Have Already Built Successful Businesses (And How You Can Too)

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Investing In Women Key To SA Socio-Economic Development

Investment in women’s empowerment delivers long-term socio-economic returns, says Novartis. Women’s networks and mentorship engagements can help unlock personal and career success.

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Empowering women has long-term positive socio-economic impacts, making women’s empowerment, career development and mentorship programmes a compelling narrative for companies.

This is according to Sibonile Dube, Head of Communications & Public Affairs at Novartis South Africa and a mentor at Phakama Women’s Academy. Marking the start of national Women’s Month, Dube cites Bain & Company research into how and why the career paths of South African women and men differ, which found that in 2017, 31% of South African companies had no female representation in senior leadership roles. The research noted that the Businesswomen’s Association of South Africa (BWASA) census on women in leadership indicated that 22% of board directors were women, but only 7% were executive directors. Only 10% of South African CEOs and only 2.2% of JSE-listed company CEOs were women.

“Considering that recent research by MCSI concluded gender diversity on the board has significant benefits for both productivity and profits, South African enterprises need to become more proactive about supporting women’s empowerment in the workplace,” says Dube. But Dube adds that while formalised empowerment and mentorship programmes are important, South African women hold some of the keys to helping both themselves and other women unlock success.

She outlines three key factors that hold women back from corporate and entrepreneurial success, and how these challenges can be overcome:

Lack of confidence

A key factor holding women back from achieving their true potential in the workplace – and as entrepreneurs – is fear and a lack of confidence, says Dube. “As women, we often undersell ourselves – we underestimate our potential, our power and the amount of influence that we have. In contrast, men are typically quite confident in themselves and their capabilities,” says Dube.

The Bain & Company survey of over 1000 women found an apparent loss of confidence amongst women in junior- and middle-management positions that they could rise to the top. At this level, some respondents noted political imbalances that were difficult to navigate; while their male colleagues had access to a sponsor or mentor (normally of the same sex and colour) to help navigate these issues.

Dube believes women need to become more proactive about empowering themselves, equipping themselves with a broad range of skills, and actively working on building their self-awareness and self- esteem. “Building skills goes beyond developing academic or technical expertise – we need to work on our relationship skills and communication skills, because human relations are crucial for success in a setting where you are looking for influence and significance.”

“Dealing with fear and lack of confidence is important, because this enables us to have relevance and contribute more meaningfully to in the workplace and in business,” says Dube.

Related: 13 Female Entrepreneurs Rising To The Top In SA

Lack of support networks

More than women, men generally back one another be it in corporate or in business deals and this has supported their career success a lot, says Dube. “Having a network is important – it is through these networks that opportunities are shared and support is gained. Having a strong network of people that back your career becomes an effective reference point especially in times of challenges. And through these networks, people are also able to find mentors.”

Dube believes mentorship is a crucial component of career success, offering both mentor and mentee opportunities to learn and grow. “We need more mentorship. With mentorship, training and coaching, women can actually pull out some of the strengths they possess which they may not be aware of. One is challenged and pushed to aim higher,” says Dube.

Bain & Company research found that sponsorship of individuals, especially at the mid-management level, ensures that contributions and performance are recognised and attributable to the individual. Often women, particularly in middle management, feel marginalised, ignored or simply worn down by trying to get their efforts recognised.

Dube, who mentors a number of women, says mentorship can be formalised through a corporate career development programme, but can also extend to informal and virtual mentor-mentee relationships. “You can be guided by simply reading the books, reading articles and watching videos and talks of inspirational leaders anywhere in the world on social media,” says Dube. Dube points out that good mentorship can be a mutually beneficial in the exchange of ideas and meeting of minds. “In an effective mentor-mentee relationship, reverse mentorship takes place. In an era where we now have four generations in the workplace, the digital and tech savvy younger generation have a lot to offer to the rest,” says Dube.

Poor Health and Wellbeing

In order to cope and remain competitive in the workplace, women have to ensure they take care of their health and maintain some resilience especially when pressure mounts. Recently, there have been a lot of conversations about mental health in South Africa. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), gender is a critical determinant of mental health and mental illness. Gender determines the difference in power and control that men and women have over the socioeconomic factors of their mental health and their exposure to specific mental health risks.

“Women are under immense pressure to perform in various spheres of their lives. Juggling a career, motherhood and marriage or a relationship can be emotionally and physically taxing to the extent of affecting one’s health, especially mental health. It is therefore imperative that women take good care of their health and wellbeing amid the demands of a competitive and fast paced lifestyle presented by the demands of modern society,” says Dube.

Depression is not only the most prevalent women’s mental health problem but may be more persistent in women than it is in men. There is more research needed to determine the reasons for this and what can be done to address it.

Related: 30 Top Influential SA Business Leaders

Unlocking empowerment

This Women’s Month, Dube says women should feel encouraged to be proactive about their own career development, and about helping other women to grow – both personally and professionally.

“As women we should be firm believers in one another. We hold the keys to opening doors for other women. By creating a support structure for one another, we can create phenomenal opportunities to make a difference for fellow women, with the aim of creating leaders and catalysing empowerment that has a ripple effect, benefiting all of society and the economy as a whole. Studies have revealed that women reinvest up to 90% of their income into their families compared to men who reinvest 30-40%. This has far reaching socio-economic gains for any society,” concludes Dube.

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Leaderex Drives Digital Transformation Agenda For 2018 Summit

Leaderex, Africa’s largest gathering of business leaders, professionals and entrepreneurs, returns to Johannesburg on 4 September 2018.

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Building on a successful debut in 2015, the organisers, Leader.co.za, in association with the JSE and leading think tanks, will host 250 masterclasses on key priority areas to drive digital transformation, including agile leadership, innovation, fintech and blockchain, AI, IoT, ecommerce and the future of work.

“Our programme has been designed around peer-based learning, allowing participants to gain practical knowledge from the trenches, engage with the best in the business, and thrive in a disrupted world,” says Leader.co.za.

Over five hundred CEOs and industry leaders will share actionable insights and advice on the day, representing one of the largest collaborations of its kind in the country.

Delegates will have the opportunity to connect with incubators, accelerators and start-up platforms, explore MBA programmes and business schools, and participate in one-on-one sessions with respected coaches and consultants.

South Africa’s lack of a savings culture will be another talking point, and investment vehicles, from tax-free savings to ETFs, will be thoroughly unpacked.

“We are pleased to be working with Leaderex again this year because we have seen the impact that the event has had since inception,” adds Mpho Ledwaba, Head of Marketing at the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE).

For executives and entrepreneurs looking to unlock value through new technologies and ways of thinking, Leaderex 2018 represents a highlight on the business calendar.

Tickets can be purchased online at www.leaderex.com.

Read next: 22 Qualities That Make A Great Leader

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