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Chivas Regal Announce SA TOP 10 Of The Venture Global Social Entrepreneur Competition

In 2014, Chivas Regal, the world’s first luxury whisky, launched The Venture, a global competition to find and support promising entrepreneurs from around the world who want to Win the Right Way.

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In 2014, Chivas Regal, the world’s first luxury whisky, launched The Venture, a global competition to find and support promising entrepreneurs from around the world who want to Win the Right Way.

Currently in its third successful year, Chivas Regal South Africa can now announce the top 10 finalists of its unique elevator pitch series, hosted by the glamorous Top Billing presenter, Lorna Maseko. The winner will walk away with R350 000 and the chance of a lifetime to represent South Africa in the international version of the Venture 3, taking place in the US.

The competing entrepreneurs are a business-savvy group who want to succeed while making a positive impact on the lives of others. They are:

the-venture-top-10-finalists

1Caley van der Kolk – Artisans in Africa

Describing her business as an “African Etsy”, Caley created a simple digital platform where high-revenue artisans can partner with artisans in rural communities and sell their authentic work internationally. The aim of the partnership is to empower communities, giving them the opportunity to keep 60% of the profits.

Related: Why Savvy Social Entrepreneurs Should Use Digital Marketing For Business Growth

2Menzi Mahlobo – Ocean in Motion

Once funded, the sustainable Ocean in Motion will offer systems that simulate ocean conditions anywhere, thus seafood can be bred and sourced inland. Through this solution, Menzi’s business will tackle food security, unemployment and rising food costs.

3Mathieu Coquillon – Mama Money

Designed for immigrants from other African countries working in South Africa, the app’s catch phrase is “Send More Money Home”, and allows the users to send money back home for food, education, medicine and other basic needs at greatly reduced rates.

4Lara Mare van Niekerk – Boma Brands cc trading as Rush Bar

Through Boma Brands cc, Rush Bars are marketed to athletes and those who want to consume “natural” products more often. Striving to uplift South Africa’s communities, Rush Bar sources its supplies locally and teaches impoverished communities to grow fruit trees that could form part of Rush Bar’s value chain.

Related: Eva Longoria And Social Entrepreneurship

5Luvuyo Rani – Silulo Ulutho Technologies

Luvuyo’s business is about making communication and teaching technology accessible in emerging and rural communities throughout the Eastern and Western Cape, as well as providing employment opportunities.

6James Their – I-drop Water

This environmentally friendly water purification system gives vulnerable communities access to safe, affordable water. With pilots already in three countries, the system can purify almost all harmful bacteria, and allows retailers to earn income for every unit operated from their outlets.

7Risna Opperman – ROSES FOR U

Through ROSES FOR U, Risna will incubate a number of small farms in the Free State that will distil highly sought-after rose essential oil. Hopefully, the farms will go on to supply a number of industries throughout South Africa and maybe even the world.

8Sizwe Nzima – Iyeza Health

Already making a difference, Iyeza Health is a bicycle-based courier company that delivers essential medications and HIV-testing kits to residents – many of them constrained by age, disability, poverty or time – of Cape Town’s less fortunate areas.

Related: How to Crack Social Entrepreneurship

9Matt Wainwright – Standard Microgrid

Standard Microgrid is a solar-powered energy system that distributes energy without access to electricity. Each utility can service 150 homes, and users only have to pay a flat fee for a month’s usage, enabling them to use the funds for further development.

10Ross Kramm – Mama Mimi’s

Ross is the founder of Mama Mimi’s, a bakery franchise that uplifts small rural communities by baking and supplying bread directly where it is consumed. This model creates entrepreneurs who run the micro bakeries, lowers the price of bread as delivery costs are removed, and creates employment.

These aspiring social entrepreneurs have come far on their personal journeys, however their “ventures” have only just begun. On 26 January 2017 at 18:30, you can catch up on their elevator pitches and see which of the five from top 10 were chosen to present their business plans to an esteemed panel of judges and celebrities, including former CEO of multi-billion rand diversified African investment holding company Shanduka and current Executive Chairperson of Sigma Capital Phuti Mahanyele; IT influencer best known as the founder of fintech company Thumbzup Innovation Stafford Masie; and renowned entrepreneur and content architect Kojo Baffoe.

It is these prominent experts who will decide South Africa’s The Venture 2017 winner, investing R350 000 in their idea and allowing him or her to represent the nation at The Venture Year 3 final in the USA. The winner will be announced on Mzansi Magic.

Shelley Reeves, Marketing Manager Scotch Whiskies at Chivas Regal, asserts that the essence of Chivas Regal’s global campaign Win the Right Way aligns the values of Chivas Regal with the human value of aspiring to use enterprise as a force for good through social entrepreneurship. This innovative form of business, she believes, creates renewed focus on key aspects of social development, such as long-term sustainability and efficiency, by blending traditional business objectives with the South African philosophy of Ubuntu.

“Over the last two years, we have shown our belief in and commitment to this philosophy by awarding USD2 million to start-ups globally that ‘do well by doing good’, because we believe purpose and profit can coexist,” she says.

Watch who makes it to the USA in the televised final on 26 January at 18:30 on Mzansi Magic.

 

Entrepreneur Magazine is South Africa's top read business publication with the highest readership per month according to AMPS. The title has won seven major publishing excellence awards since it's launch in 2006. Entrepreneur Magazine is the "how-to" handbook for growing companies. Find us on Google+ here.

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Winners Of The 2018 FAIRLADY Santam Women Of The Future Awards Announced

FAIRLADY magazine has announced the winners of the annual FAIRLADY Santam Women of the Future Awards at an exclusive VIP luncheon at Summer Place in Hyde Park.

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The three winners were selected from a shortlist of finalists by a panel of South African judges – FAIRLADY editor Suzy Brokensha, Professor Thuli Madonsela, Head HR business partners at Santam Annette La Grange, media entrepreneur and international speaker Jo-Ann Strauss and businesswoman Dawn Nathan-Jones.

Through an independent survey, Santam found that the first 1 000 days of a business are the hardest. If you’re still in business by day 1 001, they’ve found, you’re likely to succeed long term. These high-fliers have either already surpassed that critical point or are well on the way to doing so!

“Through this competition, we have seen remarkable women that have achieved amazing results.  Our aim is to ensure that these businesses have a greater impact in the South African economy. We’re honoured to have been part of their entrepreneurial journey.” said Mokaedi Dilotsotlhe, Chief Marketing Officer at Santam.

Related: 13 Female Entrepreneurs Rising To The Top In SA

We are proud to announce the winners:

Patricia Schröder of Reclite SA has been named the 2018 FAIRLADY Santam Woman of the Future (awarded to a female entrepreneur who has survived the first 1 000 days of business). Reclite SA collects, transports and recycles lighting, batteries and electronics. ‘Winning the Woman of the Future Award is recognition for all the hard work that my team and I have done and a reminder that hard work does pay off in the end! It will also serve as inspiration for other women to chase their dreams and passions,’ says Patricia.

She receives R50 000 in cash, a mentoring session with one of the judges, an Issey Miyake fragrance hamper worth R6 990, an IMM Graduate School short course worth R15 000, a Michel Herbelin watch worth R10 500, a Samsonite Karissa Biz Bailhandle and Spinner suitcase worth R7 298, a Madrid ladies handbag and purse from Jekyll & Hide valued at R4 799, a Cross pen worth R2 500 and one media training session.

Vere Shaba of Shaba & Ramplin Green Building Solutions is the winner of the 2018 FAIRLADY Santam Rising Star Award (awarded to a female entrepreneur who is still within her 1 000 days of business). Her engineering consulting firm specialises in green building certifications, engineering solutions, energy solutions and strategic partnerships across the African continent. ‘Winning this award will enable me to create opportunities in the green building sector for South Africans in the future, as well as expand the business into key economic hubs in Africa and Europe,’ says Vere.

She receives R20 000 in cash, a mentoring session with one of the judges, an Issey Miyake fragrance hamper worth R6 990, an IMM Graduate School short course worth R15 000, a Michel Herbelin watch worth R10 500, a Samsonite Karissa Biz Bailhandle and Spinner suitcase worth R7 298, a Madrid ladies handbag and purse from Jekyll & Hide valued at R4 799, a Cross pen worth R2 500 and one media training session.

Lindiwe Matlali of Africa Teen Geeks won the 2018 FAIRLADY Santam Social Entrepreneur Award (awarded to a female entrepreneur who is making a real difference in her community). Africa Teen Geeks offers children between the ages of six and 18 free lessons on how to code. The NPO has partnered with UNISA to facilitate Saturday classes in their computer labs countrywide. ‘Knowing that we give kids hope and raise their aspirations is my biggest achievement and driver,’ says Lindiwe.

Related: Watch List: 50 Black African Women Entrepreneurs To Watch

She receives R20 000 in cash, a mentoring session with one of the judges, an Issey Miyake fragrance hamper worth R6 990, an IMM Graduate School short course worth R15 000, a Michel Herbelin watch worth R10 500, a Samsonite Karissa Biz Bailhandle and Spinner suitcase worth R7 298, a Madrid ladies handbag and purse from Jekyll & Hide valued at R4 799, a Cross pen worth R2 500 and one media training session

‘I always find the winners of the FAIRLADY Santam Women of the Future Awards absolutely admirable,’ says FAIRLADY editor Suzy Brokensha. ‘But what has really struck me about this year’s winners is how they are future-proofing the world through their businesses: Patricia and Vere through huge green initiatives that have gone out of the domestic and into the commercial world, and Lindiwe through giving marginalised kids a real shot at competing in this economy on an equal footing.’

Guests in attendance at the luncheon included businesswoman Wendy Luhabe, philanthropist and author Sonia Booth, businesswoman Judi Nwokedi, Miss World SA Thulisa Keyi, international activist Catherine Constantinides, media personalities Ashley Hayden and Penny Lebyane.

Read more about the winners and their businesses in the latest issue of FAIRLADY magazine, on sale Monday, 20 August 2018.

Follow FAIRLADY on Facebook, www.facebook.com/fairladymag, @FairladyMag on Twitter and @Fairlady_Magazine on Instagram.

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Business Linkages And Investment Readiness

The Africa Women Innovation & Entrepreneurship Forum (AWIEF) is hosting its flagship Growth Accelerator Programme for 2018, sponsored by Nedbank.

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The Africa Women Innovation & Entrepreneurship Forum (AWIEF) is hosting its flagship Growth Accelerator Programme for 2018, sponsored by Nedbank. AWIEF is seeking 25 ambitious, innovative and committed early-growth-stage South African women entrepreneurs, from a variety of sectors, looking for support to scale their businesses.

Access to finance is the most cited challenge to the growth of women-owned businesses in Africa. Bankability and investment readiness are major impediments to attracting business finance.

This is an intensive six-week programme designed to support participants with the business modelling and growth strategy required to scale their enterprises, become investment ready and develop entrepreneurial leadership. The programme will cover:

  • purpose and values
  • target market, competitive landscape and value proposition
  • delivery model
  • financial modelling
  • conduct a creative force
  • growth strategy
  • financing for scale
  • pitch training.

Related: Watch List: 50 Black African Women Entrepreneurs To Watch

Nirmala Reddy, Senior Manager of Nedbank Enterprise Development, says: ‘We support initiatives such as this in line with our pledge to help clients see money differently, which is aimed at making a difference in South Africa, not just for women and children and business, but also for communities throughout the country. The bank strongly focuses on the development of female employees and black-women-owned suppliers, and this can be seen through our development and training programmes. We are also proud that women make up 62% of the workforce at Nedbank.’

The 2018 AWIEF Growth Accelerator, with its first 25 participants, is implemented as a build-up programme that will culminate at the 2018 AWIEF Conference, Exhibition and Awards event taking place on 8 and 9 November at the Cape Town International Convention Centre, where participating entrepreneurs will pitch their business to an audience of investors, business leaders and corporate decision-makers.

The three best ventures stand to win monetary prizes from AWIEF and financial management advice from Nedbank.

The programme details are as follows:

  • Dates: Starts on 17 September and culminates on 8 and 9 November 2018
  • Location: Cape Town and Johannesburg
  • Participation fee: Free 

Eligibility

Businesses must be:

  • in a post-revenue phase;
  • scalable and innovative ventures;
  • in operation for not less than two years (ideally three to five years);
  • owned or led by ambitious and committed women entrepreneurs; and
  • seeking investment or funding to grow.

If you are interested in participating, click here to apply. Applications close on 31 August 2018.

The event is hosted by AWIEF and sponsored by Nedbank.

Read next: Kid Entrepreneurs Who Have Already Built Successful Businesses (And How You Can Too)

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Investing In Women Key To SA Socio-Economic Development

Investment in women’s empowerment delivers long-term socio-economic returns, says Novartis. Women’s networks and mentorship engagements can help unlock personal and career success.

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Empowering women has long-term positive socio-economic impacts, making women’s empowerment, career development and mentorship programmes a compelling narrative for companies.

This is according to Sibonile Dube, Head of Communications & Public Affairs at Novartis South Africa and a mentor at Phakama Women’s Academy. Marking the start of national Women’s Month, Dube cites Bain & Company research into how and why the career paths of South African women and men differ, which found that in 2017, 31% of South African companies had no female representation in senior leadership roles. The research noted that the Businesswomen’s Association of South Africa (BWASA) census on women in leadership indicated that 22% of board directors were women, but only 7% were executive directors. Only 10% of South African CEOs and only 2.2% of JSE-listed company CEOs were women.

“Considering that recent research by MCSI concluded gender diversity on the board has significant benefits for both productivity and profits, South African enterprises need to become more proactive about supporting women’s empowerment in the workplace,” says Dube. But Dube adds that while formalised empowerment and mentorship programmes are important, South African women hold some of the keys to helping both themselves and other women unlock success.

She outlines three key factors that hold women back from corporate and entrepreneurial success, and how these challenges can be overcome:

Lack of confidence

A key factor holding women back from achieving their true potential in the workplace – and as entrepreneurs – is fear and a lack of confidence, says Dube. “As women, we often undersell ourselves – we underestimate our potential, our power and the amount of influence that we have. In contrast, men are typically quite confident in themselves and their capabilities,” says Dube.

The Bain & Company survey of over 1000 women found an apparent loss of confidence amongst women in junior- and middle-management positions that they could rise to the top. At this level, some respondents noted political imbalances that were difficult to navigate; while their male colleagues had access to a sponsor or mentor (normally of the same sex and colour) to help navigate these issues.

Dube believes women need to become more proactive about empowering themselves, equipping themselves with a broad range of skills, and actively working on building their self-awareness and self- esteem. “Building skills goes beyond developing academic or technical expertise – we need to work on our relationship skills and communication skills, because human relations are crucial for success in a setting where you are looking for influence and significance.”

“Dealing with fear and lack of confidence is important, because this enables us to have relevance and contribute more meaningfully to in the workplace and in business,” says Dube.

Related: 13 Female Entrepreneurs Rising To The Top In SA

Lack of support networks

More than women, men generally back one another be it in corporate or in business deals and this has supported their career success a lot, says Dube. “Having a network is important – it is through these networks that opportunities are shared and support is gained. Having a strong network of people that back your career becomes an effective reference point especially in times of challenges. And through these networks, people are also able to find mentors.”

Dube believes mentorship is a crucial component of career success, offering both mentor and mentee opportunities to learn and grow. “We need more mentorship. With mentorship, training and coaching, women can actually pull out some of the strengths they possess which they may not be aware of. One is challenged and pushed to aim higher,” says Dube.

Bain & Company research found that sponsorship of individuals, especially at the mid-management level, ensures that contributions and performance are recognised and attributable to the individual. Often women, particularly in middle management, feel marginalised, ignored or simply worn down by trying to get their efforts recognised.

Dube, who mentors a number of women, says mentorship can be formalised through a corporate career development programme, but can also extend to informal and virtual mentor-mentee relationships. “You can be guided by simply reading the books, reading articles and watching videos and talks of inspirational leaders anywhere in the world on social media,” says Dube. Dube points out that good mentorship can be a mutually beneficial in the exchange of ideas and meeting of minds. “In an effective mentor-mentee relationship, reverse mentorship takes place. In an era where we now have four generations in the workplace, the digital and tech savvy younger generation have a lot to offer to the rest,” says Dube.

Poor Health and Wellbeing

In order to cope and remain competitive in the workplace, women have to ensure they take care of their health and maintain some resilience especially when pressure mounts. Recently, there have been a lot of conversations about mental health in South Africa. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), gender is a critical determinant of mental health and mental illness. Gender determines the difference in power and control that men and women have over the socioeconomic factors of their mental health and their exposure to specific mental health risks.

“Women are under immense pressure to perform in various spheres of their lives. Juggling a career, motherhood and marriage or a relationship can be emotionally and physically taxing to the extent of affecting one’s health, especially mental health. It is therefore imperative that women take good care of their health and wellbeing amid the demands of a competitive and fast paced lifestyle presented by the demands of modern society,” says Dube.

Depression is not only the most prevalent women’s mental health problem but may be more persistent in women than it is in men. There is more research needed to determine the reasons for this and what can be done to address it.

Related: 30 Top Influential SA Business Leaders

Unlocking empowerment

This Women’s Month, Dube says women should feel encouraged to be proactive about their own career development, and about helping other women to grow – both personally and professionally.

“As women we should be firm believers in one another. We hold the keys to opening doors for other women. By creating a support structure for one another, we can create phenomenal opportunities to make a difference for fellow women, with the aim of creating leaders and catalysing empowerment that has a ripple effect, benefiting all of society and the economy as a whole. Studies have revealed that women reinvest up to 90% of their income into their families compared to men who reinvest 30-40%. This has far reaching socio-economic gains for any society,” concludes Dube.

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